supporter
Posted by Nancy Drew (+283) 12 years ago
When I went through WY last month, I noticed brand new high schools going up in two teeny towns (one was Ranchester). If there is no state tax, where are they getting this money...I heard talk that it comes from the coal mining. Is there state tax on the coal???

Very interesting as school districts in other states are in financial straits.

Maybe Wyoming is the model state we all need to look toward????
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Posted by Steve Allison (+976) 12 years ago
Don't forget Wyoming has a sales tax so if you bought anything on your way through, you helped pay for those schools.
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supporter
Posted by Nancy Drew (+283) 12 years ago
I thought Richard said he loved living there because there was no sales tax...
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Posted by J Lee Yates (+110) 12 years ago
Coal, oil and tourism and as Steve mentioned...(a modest) sales tax compared to other states, but no state income tax! And conservative over all in voting. One the largest voting groups in Wyoming, are the members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Days...the Mormons...who usually vote conservative. Also, there isn't gambling except on Reservations. I don't think Montana is ready for that many major changes.
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supporter
Posted by Bob L. (+5101) 12 years ago
Ricardo likes living in Wyoming because there aren't any gay people to force Ricardo "to worship their Gods."


Ricardo doesn't like the gays.
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moderator
founder
Posted by David Schott (+17532) 12 years ago
According to this Tax Foundation report (http://www.taxfoundation..../sr163.pdf), in 2008 Wyoming ranked 48th (with 1 being the highest state/local tax burden) in the nation for state/local tax burden. In 2008 Wyoming's state/local tax burden rate was 7.0%. Montana ranked 40th with an 8.6% state/local tax burden rate.
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Posted by Bridgier (+9307) 12 years ago
What's the federal dollars spent/federal taxes paid ratio for Wyoming? Are they self-sufficient, or are they welfare parasites?
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+15097) 12 years ago
"I thought Richard said he loved living there because there was no sales tax.."

No, I said that I like living here because there is no corporate or personal income tax. We have a 5.0% sales tax here in Campbell County.

[This message has been edited by Richard Bonine, Jr (8/6/2009)]
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supporter
Posted by Nancy Drew (+283) 12 years ago
It seems to me, no corporate tax is not a benefit to the general population. Corporate is making money and does not need to pay for the roads and state upkeep, yet use all. Not saying it needs to be major, as companies/business are what make a state healthy with jobs. But couln't they at least pay 1%?
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moderator
founder
Posted by David Schott (+17532) 12 years ago
According to this Tax Foundation report from 2005 http://www.taxfoundation....22659.html, Wyoming received $1.11 in federal spending for every $1.00 of federal tax burden. Wyoming ranked 23rd (#1 on the list received the most federal spending/$1). Montana received $1.47/$1 and ranked 11th. Bridgier, Idaho received $1.21/$1 and ranked 20th.
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supporter
Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17752) 12 years ago
While corporations in Wyoming do not pay any income taxes, they do pay sales tax. Also, Wyoming produces about a third of the nation's coal, and they have a severance tax on coal. Similarly, Wyoming has production and property taxes on oil and gas. Since they produce so much energy, that's why where their tax base is.
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Posted by Brian A. Reed (+6115) 12 years ago
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supporter
Posted by Stone (+1591) 12 years ago
The truth about taxes.

"I know I should be mortified by the lobbyist-organized mobs of angry Brooks Brothers mannequins who are now making headlines by shutting down congressional town hall meetings. I know I should be despondent during this, the Khaki Pants Offensive in the Great American Health Care and Tax War. And yet, I'm euphorically repeating one word over and over again with a big grin on my face.

Finally.

Finally, there's no pretense. Finally, the Me-First, Forget-Everyone-Else Crowd's ugliest traits are there for all to behold.

The group's core gripe is summarized in a letter I received that denounces a proposed surtax on the wealthy and corporations to pay for universal health care:

"Until recently, my family was in the top 3 percent of wage earners," the affluent businessperson fumed in response to my July column on taxes. "We are in the group that pays close to 60 percent of this nation's taxes ... Think for a second how you would feel if you built a business and contributed more than your share to this country only to be treated like a pariah."

This sob story about the persecuted rich fuels today's "Tea Parties" - and I'm sure you've heard some version of it in your community.

I'm also fairly certain that when many of you run into the Me-First, Forget-Everyone-Else Crowd, you don't feel like confronting the faux outrage. But on the off chance you do muster the masochistic impulse to engage, here's a guide to navigating the conversation:

What They Will Scream: We can't raise business taxes, because American businesses already pay excessively high taxes!

What You Should Say: Here's the smallest violin in the world playing for the businesses. The Government Accountability Office reports that most U.S. corporations pay zero federal income tax. Additionally, as even the Bush Treasury Department admitted, America's effective corporate tax rate is the third lowest in the industrialized world.

What They Will Scream: But the rich still "pay close to 60 percent of this nation's taxes!"

What You Should Say: Such statistics refer only to the federal income tax. When considering all of "this nation's taxes" including payroll, state and local levies, the top 5 percent pay just 38.5 percent of the taxes.

What They Will Scream: But 38.5 percent is disproportionately high! See? You've proved that the rich "contribute more than their share" of taxes!

What You Should Say: Actually, they are paying almost exactly "their share." According to the data, the wealthiest 5 percent of America pays 38.5 percent of the total taxes precisely because they make just about that share - a whopping 36.5 percent! - of total national income. Asking these folks to pay slightly more in taxes - and still less than they did during the go-go 1990s - is hardly extreme.

Stripped of facts, your conversation partner will soon turn to unscientific terrain, claiming it is immoral to "steal" and "redistribute" income via taxes. Of course, he will be specifically railing on "stealing" for stuff like health care, which he insists gets "redistributed" only to the undeserving and the "lazy" (a classic codeword for "minorities"). But he will also say it's OK that government sent trillions of dollars to Wall Streeters.

And that's when you should stop wasting your breath.

What you've discovered is that the Me-First, Forget-Everyone-Else Crowd isn't interested in fairness, empiricism or morality.

With 22,000 of their fellow countrymen dying annually for lack of health insurance and with Warren Buffett paying a lower effective tax rate than his secretary, the Me-First, Forget-Everyone-Else Crowd is merely using the argot of fairness, empiricism and morality to hide its real motive: selfish greed.

No argument, however rational, is going to cure these narcissists of that grotesque disease." David Sirota
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supporter
Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+15097) 12 years ago
What does this article have to do with Wyoming and the way we do things here. I would question whether David Sirota knows that Wyoming even exists.
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Posted by Brian A. Reed (+6115) 12 years ago
Being as David Sirota once lived in Montana, I'm sure he's aware of which state lies to the south of ours, Richard.

I'm sure your homeboys at WND have always kept Wyoming's - and other western states' - best interests at heart.

[This message has been edited by Brian A. Reed (8/8/2009)]
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