Posted by Cheryl Gaer-Barlow (+481) 13 years ago
There seems to be so many MEN who cook on this thread (this surprises me because my husband is an outdoor man who won't go NEAR a kitchen, and even a lady who is married to a chef,so maybe one of you could help me.
When I cook rice as a side dish, my husband likes a sauce on it. (!!???!!) I've tried heated Hickory Farms sweet and sour sauce and it's o.k.; gravy seems too heavy,any suggestions?
Also, How can I bread zuccini without the breading falling off? I've tried egg, egg and milk with varied breadings, panco, etc.
Yes, I know these are stupid questions, but I'll bet someone knows! Thanks!
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Posted by Kyle L. Varnell (+3747) 13 years ago
What kinds of sauces does he like Cheryl? I like a nice garlic/butter or garlic/oil with herbs myself.

As a kid though I would always put heaping mounds of sugar on it. Guess that's why I had a few cavities.
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Posted by M G (+195) 13 years ago
I usually throw a cube of beef or chicken bullion per cup of water when I cook rice. A little alpine touch and yer good. Sometimes, if I'm having steak, I'll cook in some steak sauce, that kind of thing. Either way, it's not a sauce like you're looking for but it adds flavor..

Can't help you with the zuccini..
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Posted by Steve Allison (+983) 13 years ago
Try a jar of Alfrado sauce, sweet and sour, or any other sauce that goes with your main coarse. If you are making sauce of the main dish, make some extra to stir into the rice. I like using stock with some spices repeated from the main dish to make the rice. This gives it a saucy taste with little extra effort. Try coating the zucchini with flour, then eggs then the breading. The moist zucchini, dry flour, moist egg dry breading gives everything something to stick to.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+18267) 13 years ago
I can't help much, either, as:

1. I never make a sauce for rice (I don't make it as a side dish, I usually am putting something on top of it such as stir fry, meatballs and gravy, etc.) Why don't you try making risotto, if you want a rice side dish? Its easy.

2. I've never breaded zucchini....either I grill it or stir fry it. If I was going to bread it, I would probably take the skin off, chunk it up, dust it with cornstarch, then an egg wash, then the breading. Or skip the egg wash and breading, and dip it in beer batter.
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Posted by spacekace (+886) 13 years ago
When I cook white rice, it's usually because I am putting something saucy on it like meatballs...teriyaki chicken etc...but, my new favorite side is wild rice. I use the rice a roni box and throw a can of mushrooms in with it, it has a good flavor and the 'shrooms add a bit more substance. I know, some are not a fan of rice in a box--I wasn't either, but this makes a quick and easy side when there just isn't enough time.

As far as the zuchinni...I always have sliced the zuc's thin and then dipped them in egg and then cracker crumbs (smash them up really good so it's a powdery floury substance...I use saltines). And then dip them into heated oil in a pan. It seems like the breading stays on them fine. You could also try a tempura batter, you can buy mixes at the store, or I have a recipe if anyone would like. My mom uses that to fry every vegetable imaginable...all with great luck.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+10264) 13 years ago
Gunnar is probably onto something with the cornstarch tip. Batter would also likely work better than breading.

As far as rice goes. . . .

Rather than saucing it up, add some stock to the water and then steam it with chopped veggies. If you don't want to use stock, a simple trick is to just add some Italian dressing straight out of the bottle to the water along with the chopped veggies.

Or perhaps try something like dirty rice:
http://www.google.com/#hl...IisSmNKyjc

Google for some beans & rice recipes. Red beans and rice can be prepared a lot of different ways - Cuban-style black beans & rice is good as well.

Google for Rice & peas and other Caribbean rice dishes and see how they sound to you.

[This message has been edited by Hal Neumann (4/8/2009)]
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Posted by Cheryl Gaer-Barlow (+481) 13 years ago
Wow! Thank you everybody! I've got some great tips from all of you!
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Posted by T Brown (+480) 13 years ago
The other night I cooked Basmati rice with chicken stock instead of water...I also Baked Chicken and steamed some Asperagus...so.....I made Hollandais sauce for the veggie....which was also amazing on the rice. I always cook my rice, no matter what kind, with either chicken or beef stock. It adds so much more flavor to it. As far as the zuchini goes, I just either steam or saute it. Sorry I can't help you with a breading.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6167) 13 years ago
Cheryl,

One thing about the zucchini is that it contains a lot of water which can prevent the egg or breading from sticking to it. I know that with eggplant and zucchini it is sometimes a good idea to sprinkle it with salt and let it sit for about 30 minutes. This will bring the water to the surface. Then wipe off the salt with damp paper towels. Dip in flour, then an egg wash, then roll in panko or regular bread crumbs.
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Posted by TK (+1625) 13 years ago
On the rice as a side dish, I like adding an egg (scrambles when you stir!), frozen peas (thawed), celery cut small and thin, and carrots cut small and thin. Sometimes I'll add a teriyaki sauce, or sometimes I'll just leave it as is and if anyone wants a "sauce", they can add as much or as little soy sauce as they want. Seems to work pretty well! And it's yummy!

Risotto is always really yummy--and there's lots of variations!

On the zucchini...
Breaded Zucchini
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 1-3 fresh zucchini, no more than one day old

 1 large egg, lightly beaten

 2-3 tablespoons cold tap water

 3-6 tablespoons finely sifted, all-purpose flour

 2 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan cheese (pre-packaged can be used when fresh is not available although it alters the taste somewhat)

 2-3 cups olive oil for frying (I usually use just plain old vegetable oil)

Thoroughly wash and rinse the zucchini, and pat dry with paper towels. Next, using a sharp knife, slice off about 1/4 inch of both ends to remove any woody taste. Then using a mandolin, gently slice the zucchini lengthwise, processing only one at a time to avoid discoloration.

Mix the egg with the tap water in a flat-bottomed dish. In a separate flat-bottomed dish, sift the flour and parmesan cheese together. Next, gently coat(you don't want a thick coating as it generally won't stay on!) each of the zucchini slices by dipping them in the egg mixture and then the flour mixture. Place them on a plate until all the strips from the first zucchini are ready. (Unless you have helpers in the kitchen or six hands, there is no other way. You have to do each one individually to keep them from discoloring and ruining the taste.)

Pour the oil into a large-bottomed, wok-type skillet, or into an actual wok for best frying results. When the first set of zucchini strips is ready, heat the olive oil to just below the smoking point. Carefully add the zucchini strips one at a time to the hot oil. Using tongs, gently turn to assure even browning on each side.They are done when the edges are slightly golden in color (usually about 1-2 minutes over a medium-high heat.) Remove from the oil and drain on folded paper towels. Serve immediately or keep warm in a 250-degree oven.
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Posted by Cheryl Gaer-Barlow (+481) 13 years ago
This is great! You guys are great! This is what I wanted to know. Thank you all!
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Posted by TamiLY (+235) 13 years ago
I discovered that when frying breaded vegetables, if you dip them in your egg, water, whatever then roll it in the flour, bread, crumbs, whatever, place the veggies on a baking sheet in a single layer and pop them into the freezer until frozen. For some reason freezing it first keeps the breading from sliding off while it cooks. It's kind of a pain, but make up a bunch and keep some on hand in your freezer for future meals.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+18267) 13 years ago
Excellent advice here.....somehow, I knew in my heart of hearts, that if anyone knew how to deep fry breaded/battered vegetables, it woould be the good people of Miles City.
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Posted by urcrackinmeup (+136) 13 years ago
I am so hungry now. Good hints though.
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