Miles City Style
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Posted by Joe Whalen (+176) 20 years ago
What is Miles City Style?

If you were to walk into a bookstore somewhere and pick up a large, beautifully-photographed book called "Miles City Style" what would you find between the covers?

Every place has its own sense of style. A location distinguishes itself from others by doing little things in its own way. Those things can range from the way people greet each other on the street to the way people people dress to the way buildings are constructed. Think of the good things that withstand the test of time in Miles when everything else changes around it. When you think of the best of Miles City Style what comes to mind?

A few categories for ideas:

Ways of Greeting People
Other Personal Expressions
Favorite Beverages
Events
Preferred Music
Food
Places
Vehicles of Choice
Articles of Clothing
Architecture
Furniture or icons found in most Miles City homes
Tools of Choice
Haircuts
Toys for Kids
Books & Magazines

*Remember: It's important to be specific.

Here's an example: There are vehicles of all descriptions cruising Main Streets throughout the U.S. But in Miles City, on any given day, you'll see a higher percentage of Ford 3/4-ton 4WD diesel pickups towing empty aluminum gooseneck stock trailers than most other towns in America. That's an example of Miles City Style.

Anything come to mind? Please try to be constructive. I think we'll all find that Miles City has it's own kind of cool.
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Posted by Bart Freese (+928) 20 years ago
Hmmmmmmm. You know, that's a tough one without getting too cliche -- the old hand shake a little firmer thing. Or, the Lake Wobegon (sp.) where all the kids are above average (when reading that try to hear a heavy, breathy voice -- ala Garrison K. ).

Okay, back to the subject. One thing I've noticed are the number of people that have either come to Miles City planning to stay only a few years because they couldn't wait to leave, but then found they loved the place and are still here. Or, the folks that did leave, and then came back to visit and tell you how much they miss the town. Having a city with a fair number of government jobs, you tend to have a lot of folks come and go. More than once, and I am not making this up or may lightening strike my computer, I have actually heard former residents say that some of their best times were living here. True, they were more youthful.

One possible reason is the relative ease to get involved with things and be accepted (oh, I'm sure someone has experiences not fitting this statement). I knew a gal who went out to the Art Center many years ago and was able to jump right in. She was surprised by this for some reason. The friendly cold of some places doesn't seem to exist as much here.

The "eastern Montana wave" to people you have no idea who they are is another such "style" item. I've always liked that one myself. This is the one where you're driving the Jordan, or Broadus highway and you meet an outfit -- they wave, you wave. Then again, you were both probably wondering if anyone was still on the planet and just glad to see someone else out there.

Talking too much might also fall in your style idea. Spent 1/2 hour standing in front of Reynolds blathering away with friends. I'm just getting in practice for retirement and one of those Main Street park benches. I'll be the guy making faces at the web cam (see miles-city.com gone?).


[This message has been edited by Bart Freese (edited 6/20/2002).]

[This message has been edited by Bart Freese (edited 7/2/2002).]
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+12372) 20 years ago
Miles City style includes piles of tree cotton in the corners. It's silverleaf poplar cotton in the early spring and cottonwood later in the summer. It blows into little clumps behind things. In heavy cotton years, it looks like a snow storm, you almost suffocate when trying to breathe outside and the lawns look as if they were covered in snow. Lighting cotton is a popular adolescent pastimes. That means setting it on fire with a match and watching it burn across the lawn.


In less cottony years, it's just the occasional violent sneeze and the person you are talking to says, as they wipe their nose and apologize, "Cotton," and we all know they don't mean the stuff grown in the south.

So, white piles of fluff in the corners of even the tidiest cars and houses are definitely part of it.

--Amorette
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Posted by Heather McCracken (+23) 20 years ago
Wow! After all theses years I finally have an explanation for why I am the way I am! Especially the "talking to much" :0)))) Had to show it to my husband and say "see, I'm really ok"!

One day while waiting in the car for me to "just run in and pick something up" (silly man!) he naturally had to wait about 30 min. while I chatted with a fellow employee. He said he thought I must have a talking disease and actually suggested therapy! I laughed and said "what, you want to PAY for me to have someone to talk to?" Needless to say, he never mentioned it again! LOL

And the "wave", I still do that too even after 20 odd years.

Heather McCracken (Frederick)
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Posted by Bart Freese (+928) 20 years ago
Dry heat certainly can come into this somehow during the summertime -- now what made me think of this I haven't a clue.

For many, air-conditioning is limited to a room, or two if existing at all. AC, while a lot more in use today then 10 to 20 years ago, is still not used as much as in other places. I suppose this is due to the lower humidity of our desert country. But a "style" item would be the "midnight dash" to shut windows and turn off fans when the mosquito (sp?) truck sprays its way up and down our streets on the hottest nights. Another "Sleepless in Miles City" is the high wind and/or thunderstorm that produces no rain.

I imagine many of these items actually are familiar ones all around the world.
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Posted by Jim Linnell (+7) 20 years ago
Howdy from Texas. Growing up in Miles City, one of the things I was always fascinated with but probably didn't appreciate enough was the high quality craftsmanship that was produced in the saddle shops in the area. Today, I live and work in the leather industry and the "Miles City Style" is a recognized style of leatherwork that originated in the saddle shops of Miles City.

I've recently gotten involved with the Texas & Southwest Cattle Raisers Association and their museum here in Ft. Worth, Texas. When you visit their museum, you will see a collection of saddles made by various well known makers. At least 20% of the saddles were made in Miles City.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+12372) 20 years ago
They are still making 'em here. I have a neighbor at my office, Brown's Saddlery. I believe he trained under Pete Verbeck. He definitely makes beautiful saddles with that Miles City floral pattern.

--Amorette
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Posted by Sharpsman (+15) 16 years ago
I can't really speak on the style of Miles City but I've read much about the history thereof but I can allow you this one tidbit of info:

"Be glad you're living in a really great state and area rather than a population infested area somewhere else! You're residing in a "last bastion" area, free of traffic congestion and many ills that are rampant in other locations which you're only experiencing to a minor degree!"

I've visited in Forsyth, Billings, and Big Timber and really enjoyed my time there! I hope to come back into your area in June when the Quigley Shooting Match is held again at Forsyth!

You're blessed in living in MONTANA!!
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Posted by Stone (+1598) 16 years ago
You can not talk about Miles City without mentioning Friday night Football. The place is always packed. Miles City is a Football town.
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Posted by Shannon Lamon (+29) 16 years ago
Having lived on South 4th near the golf course when I was a youngster I remember the beautiful sound of the cannon going off during a Cowboy touchdown, the roar of the crowd and the band. The lights above the field lit up that part of town as if that was the only place one should be on a Friday night.
Going back to the cottonwood trees that were brought up before, I love the tall old cottonwoods blowing in the breeze down by the Tongue River and Spotted Eagle. I enjoyed looking through them on a hot summer evening watching the sun go down. Ah, those beautiful sunsets. How about the fact that the Miles City swimming pool was a great place to cool off and spend the day relaxing with friends. Swimming lessons at 8:00 in the morning. Brrrrrr. That of course was before I had the luxury of swimming in a blue chlorinated pool, but we knew nothing else during those years. I miss Miles City a lot. Coming home to visit my family is the best stress reliever ever. Miles City is relaxing and uplifting for me!!
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Posted by MCGirl (+300) 16 years ago
Denton field, a Saturday night in July. It's hot, the bugs are out, the lights are on, and it smells like leather and popcorn.
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Posted by Stone (+1598) 16 years ago
Mcgirl, Do not forget the sunflower seeds. I do appreciate baseball on a hot Saturday night but much prefer a cool fall Friday night of Football myself. Although both have there moments.

MCgirl- do you really like the smell of leather? Are you talking about a baseball glove??
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Posted by Shannon Lamon (+29) 16 years ago
How about the old BIG AL's deli. Had some of the BEST food in town and you could sit in there on a Saturday or even a weekday for that matter and run into all kinds of people you knew. My family and I would sit in Big Al's all Saturday morning and have coffe, laugh, and enjoy all the company that would come in and out. It was like a community gathering place for some. I think this is Miles City style. I am sure there are other gathering spots now but sure wish the good things could last forever!!
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Posted by Duncan Bonine (+290) 16 years ago
The BHS Parade (the way I remember it 20-30 yrs ago) is to me everything that is Miles City Style. It's a virtual melting pot of youth and history, horses and marching groups, tractors and buggies. Downtown on Sat morning you could expect to see anybody and everybody that you hadn't seen for the rest of the year.
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Posted by Shannon Lamon (+29) 16 years ago
I would say the same for the Custer County Fair 20 years ago. You could pretty much count on running into people you had not seen all year. 4-H entries were plentiful and the exhibition halls full. Part of my memories include the smell of the stock barns. Would not be a great county fair without it.
I also recall a great parade for the Centennial celebration way back when. I think it was the Centennial anyways, I was still a youngster. I rode on one of the big, black, and noisy, steam/coal? engines with my grandpa down main street. People were dressed in period clothing, lots of horses and carriages, the calgary with General Custer and the ladies riding side saddle. A great community celebration!
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Posted by Danny T (+53) 16 years ago
There seems to be an unusually high number of pianos in Miles City. Almost every house I've been in has one.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+15369) 16 years ago
Shamerleens, Paco's, Fingersteaks, The Chuckwagon at the Crossroads, Bobby Burns celebration, Patty Hart and the Sweethearts, The Creshendos, The windmill on top of the Red Rock Inn, and the Belt Buster.
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Posted by Chad (+1765) 16 years ago
Miles City Style???

Coming in from the North each day I'm greeted by older, run down buildings, a lack of sidewalks, weeds overgrowing yards, the slough and back lots. Homes are small and old; the Realtors call them quaint and vintage. Often the asphalt shingle roofs are worn out, waiting to be replaced when the next hail storm provides an influx of insurance money and storm chaser roofing crews. There's plenty of asbestos shingle siding in original 40's and 50's colors. Where the siding is missing you can often find patches of aluminum sheets with text and pictures on them- remnants of the offset print process at the Miles City Star. Quite often there's a dead car or pickup, with a window broken out, straddling the sidewalk and the boulevard. If the old beater isn't in the front, it can be found in the alley blocking the one car garage that's so full of crap you can't park in it. There may even be a dead car or motor sports vehicle in the middle of the back yard. They're all absolutely worthless of course- but the owners find they have some sentimental or intrinsic value; that or they're too cheap, or poor, to have them hauled off. (Being worthless you have to pay Auto Dismantlers to come get them).

The front yard is a mix of grass, weeds (dandelions), dead fall (from the 100 year old cottonwood tree), and bare spots from lack of water or too much weed-n-feed. Side yards are 4 feet wide and useless. In the back yard you find a rutted path following the chain link fence, worn in by the pent up dog pacing back and forth, barking at the school kids as they walk by and taunt him. The back lawn is dead. There are old tires stacked against the garage, and a puddle of oil under the dead vehicle. The petroleum puddle makes pretty, rainbow pattens on top of the mud puddles when it rains, making its way slowly to the slough and eventually to the Yellowstone River.

Inside the house is a TV so big it takes up one whole wall of the living room. Across the room is a Lazy-Boy recliner in some audacious color of velvet or velour. Grandma's old brown floral couch is on the other wall, you know the one; it has wagon wheels and water wells on it with little sky blue flowers and rust colored trees. In the winter the old single pane windows are iced over with frost, even with the layer of 6 mil plastic over them. The front door has paint peeling off the outside, inside the bottom half is scraped bare by the stupid dog telling you he wants to go outside to bark at the school kids.

On the stove in the kitchen is Kraft Easy Mac, because so few people know how to cook. Placing noodles into a pot of boiling water, draining them off when they're softened and adding a bit of milk, butter and cheese is beyond the realm of the average working stiff. In the fridge is soda pop for the kids, Cheep beer for dad and diet soda for mom; that's assuming the family is still intact.

Mom either stays home to take care of the kids or works two jobs to help make ends meet. Dad works long days for a pittance, with no benefits or insurance. He can often be found working at least one weekend day in addition to Monday through Friday from 8-5. After work on Fridays he takes the family out to one of the Bar/Restaurant/Casinos for dinner and some fun. He drinks too much and they go home, crash out, and repeat the process again the next week, and the next.

On the positive side Butch and Gloria still serve up some great liver and onions at the 600 Cafe; it's best with some mustard!

[This message has been edited by Chad (edited 2/24/2006).]
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Posted by Chris Choate Raible (+35) 16 years ago
I think Miles City style is a feeling when you drive over the Tongue River bridge and see the pool and beautiful park with the huge cottonwood trees knowing that you are back home again. I get this feeling anytime I come back to visit and see Main Street and the easier living that makes Miles City the best place to be. Most everyone you meet has a hello or a smile and seems to care. My kids give me a hard time and say that I talk to people in line while I'm shopping here in Phoenix and that I'm too friendly, but that is what I learned growing up in Miles and wouldn't trade it. It's a hello from Martha at the Airport Inn who has waited on us forever and you know you will see at least 10 people there you haven't seen for a long time. They will still greet you and ask how you are. That is what is unique about Miles City. Good hearted people.
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Posted by Bart Freese (+928) 16 years ago
Right you are, Chris!
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Posted by Chris Choate Raible (+35) 16 years ago
Thanks Bart
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Posted by Stone (+1598) 16 years ago
Well said Chad, go home then if you do not like it.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+15369) 16 years ago
Chad: I have to tell you that as I read your post I was reminded more of Gallup, NM than Miles City, MT.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+15369) 16 years ago
The one stop shopping offered by Western Pharmacy, where you could get medicine for both yourself and your cows.

There was an elderly couple who use to get around Miles City in a rickety old two wheel cart that was pulled by troy bilt rototiller. And I remember one of the Grenz's that used to drive his 8N Ford tractor everywhere. I think he lost his license to a DWI and this was his way of getting around the law. Also, the guy that used to walk down the center of main street carrying his bicycle on his shoulder.

Others have mentioned the BHS parade. But there are not very many other parades where you would see Rumley Oil Pull tractors or my personal favorite the Pioneer tractor in a parade. I got to drive both.

[This message has been edited by Richard Bonine, Jr (edited 2/25/2006).]
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Posted by Rick Kuchynka (+4453) 16 years ago
Chad, that approach on the North is intentional. It's to avoid too much "civilization" shock for the travelers on their way in from Jordan.

They need to be phased in
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+18248) 16 years ago
Miles City Style? Well, after eating dinner at the Hole-in-the-Wall Friday night, one of those characteristics is being too inconsiderate to turn off your cell phone in a restaurant. Honest to God, I witnessed three cell phone rings and ensuing conversations while I was there. Here in the big city of Helena, I can't recall seeing someone's cell phone ringing, let alone carrying on a 15 minute conversation at the table, for a very long time (at least since the last century).
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Posted by JJC (+79) 16 years ago
I had to be in Miles City on Friday and Saturday. We went to the Airport Inn for supper. A comment from my brother-in-law was, "Anywhere else this pizza would be just ok, but for people from here it is a great tradition." People from somewhere else couldn't appreciate how good it is. We are always glad to be back. It just wouldn't be the same without Martha waiting on our table, either.
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Posted by Chad (+1765) 16 years ago
Richard,

I agree with your assessment of Gallup; I was there on Christmas Day of 2004 and saw a lot of similarities; though Gallup has better Latin food.

Stone,

Let's not go after each others throats. I was sick and grumpy when I responded to the MC Style post. I still feel that there is always room for improvement, at the worst or best places in town.
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Posted by rosemary (+65) 16 years ago
calling a wrong number,and end up having a lenghty conversation with said person or knowing the person they are trying to reach
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Posted by mom (+73) 16 years ago
A great part of that style are the people who have been gone for one reason or another, who always come back knowing beyond a doubt that they will be welcomed, spoken too. They can rely on someone on main street always stopping and asking how they are, how their mother, grandfather, or even old dog is getting along. That person will likely detain them long enough to tell a story about that same relative. Usually it happened before they were born, and maybe it came from someone who heard it from someone.....but it still comes out like it happened yesterday. When the prodigal son walks away from that visit he is strangely content in hisvisit and wonders what took him so long to return. Returning wanderers are never left feeling unwelcome, unwanted or even unfamiliar.

For the hardy souls who still have their boot heels dug in here, style is being able to go somewhere in town without a checkbook and still return with what you went for. Class is knowing that you will always be repaid for extending that credit, if not by the forgetful soul, by his son or daughter, or mother....ah heck, you're progbably related to them anyway. Thanks Miles City, you are a big part of who I am.
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Posted by ssommerfeld (+23) 16 years ago
Hey, Jim! I am originally from Ft. Worth and never knew that Miles City produced that much. How's Funky Town doing?
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Posted by ssommerfeld (+23) 16 years ago
Having just moved here in August 2005, I am amazed at how comfortable I already am here. I love being in line, engaging in conversation with my fellow shoppers and finding out how they know my family. Asking my coworkers where to take my car to, who would be the best daycare provider....and having the assurance that these questions will be answered honestly as well as knowledgably. Miles City style is composed of threads of humanity, where you still see the faithful dogs strikingly composed in the back of a pickup bed as the family truck rambles down the road. It makes me smile to see just as many "citified" versions, as cars have the window cracked for the lap dogs to enjoy the fresh air. I am glad I made the choice to move here, and blessed that I have found such an caring flowerbed of a community for my daughter and I to grow in.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+15369) 16 years ago
"I have found such an caring flowerbed of a community for my daughter and I to grow in."

Lord knows that if you hang around the Bison or the 600 you will find plenty of "fertilizer"
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Posted by Jon Bonine (+160) 16 years ago
The mention of Cottonwoods brings to mind Caledonian picnics at the Range Riders. The sound of bagpipes in the distance as someone practices. Going down to the BHS street dance just to visit with people and watch all the drunks. The annual thunderstorm during the Eastern Montana Fair. You just don't find those sort of things anywhere but Miles City
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+15369) 16 years ago
You got to go to the BHS street dance? That's not fair. I never got to do anything like that.
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Posted by Russell Bonine (+236) 16 years ago
The fair comes once a year and it's always in August!
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Posted by Buck Showalter (+4462) 16 years ago
Ooh, drinking beer with General Custer and the Cavalry is always fun.
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Posted by Bob L. (+5096) 16 years ago
Buck: Yes, indeed.

Nothing like BHS weekend.

I can't wait - I've got a motley group of 10 or so heading out there this year - at least 5 who have never experienced it before. Good times.
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Posted by Gary Bonine (+98) 16 years ago
I can still hear Tom Mott practicing his pipes just down the street while I was chasing the squirrels at Eagles Manor.

I can still remember how scared I was to go get milk from M&H because of all the big mean highschoolers that were there.

How about setting 'boobie traps' on the gate to the pig barn at the fair. (we used those pull-string fire cracker things)

or when I rode my bike all the way to Kmart thinkin I accomplished some great marathonic feat.

oh yea. and Jon, while you were watchin the drunks at the BHS i was walking up to them and asking, " Hey Dad, can I have $20 "
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Posted by Shannon Lamon (+29) 16 years ago
I remember riding my bike all over Miles City as a youngster, over to Bender Park for softball practice, to the swimming pool, Parkway Rollercade and to the old greenhouse that use to be located on Tompy near the golf course I believe. They had a great candy selection!!Also, my sister and I use to love the old drive-in theater. Mom and Dad would load us into the car, let us watch the early movie and as we fell asleep they would watch the late movie, usually not child orientated of course. Before the movie we would stop at the A&W. Dad loved the chili dogs there.
One other part of Miles City style to me would be the wonderful dances up at the Rainbow Room of the Eagles Club and the smell of their kitchen as my grandpa Bill cooked for certain functions held there. Believe I learned to dance in the Rainbow Room with my dad. Still love to visit the Eagles when I come home to visit.
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Posted by Sam Hould (+46) 16 years ago
June Bugs.....lots and lots of June bugs!!! I love to hate them. I have lived in a number of towns in Montana and I don't seem to recall thier evening lullaby anywhere else. They have a soft spot in my memories.
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Posted by Sis (+19) 16 years ago
Miles City Style...being back in town for less than a day and all of your friends, relatives, teachers and coaches know it...and all you did was stop in at the Cellar for some pizza...that is what happened the last time I was in town...WOW made me feel like I had never left.
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Posted by Chad (+1765) 16 years ago
Dirty cowboy boots (from actually using them); a hat with a ring of sweat around the band (from actually sweating); jeans that earned their wear the hard way (not in a washer after being treated with a grinder and bleach); a cheap night out on the town that may include a less than USDA Prime steak; a cold Golden Spur beer at a friends place; a familiar wave from a passing pickup; a hand beside the road when you're broke down; enjoying a flick on a big screen in a theater that still has 800 seats; being able to see the Milky Way at night while roasting marshmallows in the back yard; a crooked old horse that likes to eat my wife's flowers; neighbors that don't care when I fire off a rifle at those pesky rabbits (in the middle of the night); gumbo (not mud, Gumbo); mosquitoes that won't die no matter how hot or cold it gets; homemade rhubarb pie; my washboard abs (actually the way my belly shakes when I drive on the dirt road going home); trips to the big city- Billings!

[This message has been edited by Chad (edited 4/7/2006).]

[This message has been edited by Chad (edited 4/8/2006).]
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Posted by deer_slayer (+488) 16 years ago
Miles City is all about you and your your buddies sneaking beer out of your dads' supply for the six weeks leading up to Buckin' Horse weekend. 4 Schimdts, 3 Stroh's and 7 Bud's were the statistical average for the Middle School years. Which is quite a grip for a bunch of 8th graders!
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Posted by Rene Mowry (+15) 16 years ago
Shannon, that celebration was for the Montana Stockgrower's Diamond Jubilee (75 yrs). All the stores on Main Street put up a facade of logs and old wood to look like the "Old West." I was very young then,too and my mother made the old-fashioned dresses for all of us -- herself, my aunt, and myself and my cousins. They all matched. We had matching bonnets, too. She made a fancy bolo tie with beads for my little cousin. He was probably 3 yrs old at the time. Very cute. My Gramma worked at the Ingham Hotel in the laundry, and all the employees and the owner there wore period clothing, too. All the business owners decked out like it was 1825. I have a photo of my Gramma and the Ingham crew standing in front of the huge wooden desk in the lobby of the Hotel. The only way you can tell it wasn't an old photo from the 1800's is because the photo is in color.
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Posted by grace t (+40) 16 years ago
YA WELL, I JUST VISITED MILES AFTER BEIN AWAY FOR ABOUT 4 YRS, WENT OUT WITH FRIENDS TO BO-JANGLES, AND LOW & BEHOLD, I GOT TO HEAR ABOUT THE DRAMA AMD B.S THAT HAPPENED WHEN I WAS STILL LIVING THERE, AND I GOTTA TELL YA THAT MADE ME REALLY SAD & ANGRY AS TO KNOWING THAT SOME PEOPLE JUST CANT LET GO... WHY IS IT THAT SOME PEOPLE HOLD SUCH A GRUDGE??? NOBODY WANTS TO BE REMINDED OF THE BAD PAST,& DRAMA... COME-ON PEOPLE ....JUST LET GO ALREADY
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+12372) 16 years ago
UNLOCK YOUR CAPS KEY! Seriously, it is actually more difficult to read all caps than lower and uppercase combined, in a addition to being seen as "shouting" on the internet and rude.

Amorette
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Posted by Kacey (+3161) 16 years ago
I think that was intended as shouting. Sounds pretty upset.
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Posted by grace t (+40) 16 years ago
o sorry guys... didnt mean to b rude
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+15369) 16 years ago
I love compassionate liberals.
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Posted by Richard G Flor (+213) 16 years ago
I love compassionate Liberal Democrats!
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Posted by Liz Weimer (+42) 16 years ago
Miles City Style! Can we say...North DakOOOta!

Moving to the high desert of southwestern Wyoming has shown me that I really do have an accent. Ag sounds like egg, maaayysuring spoon, etc. Geez...you think you talk "right" until you move away...

When I think of southeastern Montana, I think of cottonwoods, sagebrush, and the river. There's no better smell in fall than rotting cottonwood leaves (smells better than it sounds)! I miss the abundant wildlife - sure we've got antelope, wild horses, and lizards, but I miss hearing the frogs at night while watching the stars, checking out beaver dams and raccoon footprints by the river, as well as the geese (oh, the geese!!) flying overhead all fall long.
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Posted by Shu (+1796) 16 years ago
This is all sounding like the posts on the "you know you're from Miles City when..." blog on this same website. You should check that one out if you haven't already...it has over 200 posts on it.
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Posted by Tammy (+71) 16 years ago
Growing up Miles City Style was grand! What I remember most is:

Riding my bike to the city pool

The Sunset Drive-in (Something I wish our communities would bring back)

The 4th of July picnics at the city park

Good ole Spotted Eagle

The awsome Bucking Horse Sale

The Bean Bag Store

Folks taking care of each other

What I still like is that It has not changed that much.
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Posted by Jonathan Sohl (+13) 16 years ago
Growing up in Southeastern MT, my memories of the area are somewhat comforting now that I am not too close to West Dakota.
The cottonwood trees and the abundance of cotton floating around and having to sweep/shopvac it out of the garage.
Going into Red Rock and asking how the goose hunting has been.
The crisp fall air and the sound of the pep band on the way to football games on Friday night.
The sound of the guy driving around spraying for mosquitoes and scrambling to close every window in the house.
Block parties on Neu Vu.and throwing water balloons at all our parents.
The people. I somewhat miss the firm handshakes and looking the person in the eye when you talk to them.
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Posted by Chris Peterson (+162) 15 years ago
I have heard of the kindness of Miles City folks, and have experienced and felt it first hand. While making prank phone calls at the age of 7, I'd called a random number asking if the refridgerator was running. Expecting the obvious, much to my dismay, she blew me right off the track answering 'why no, It just broke. are you calling from GE because its a general electric and I need a repair man as soon as possible. I just bought a groceries and do not want to loose them with this heat'. She had me assure her that someone would be there that day. By the time we hung up the phone, she had me feeling so guilty, I never made another prank phone call my entire life. I felt so guilty, I never told anyone for years. When i finally did, they laughed telling my how badly i'd been played by that wise ol bird.....i have wondered who that wise ol bird was ever since. I'd like to thank her, but she probably knew that too.
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