Lorman L. Hoopes
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Posted by Kenny Vail (+111) 20 years ago
Does anyone know where Lorman Hoopes is now residing?

Kenny
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11984) 20 years ago
Um, Custer County cemetery. He passed away a few years ago, not long after he finished the book. Sorry.

--Amorette
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Posted by Kenny Vail (+111) 20 years ago
Thanks, Amorette,

I am enjoying the book I got from you more than I had expected. Lots of good stuff for my project.

Kenny
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11984) 20 years ago
It is great fun. At first, an index of a bunch of old newspapers sounds so dull but when you start reading the entries. . .not only in the information about real life in the old west fascinating, some of it is pretty darn funny, too! Glad you are enjoying it.

--Amorette
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Posted by Kenny Vail (+111) 20 years ago
Amorette,

Lorman Hoopes quoted from the diary of one Thomas Irvine. It was a brief quote, but it happens to co-incided precisely
to a pertinent time frame (spring, 1879) in my story. Would this mean that the diary was available to public view; like in the Montana Room?

Thanks, Kenny
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11984) 20 years ago
Hmmm. Don't know. Tom Irvine was an early sheriff, that much I know. I will ask my contacts if anyone knows. I have a copy of Geo. Miles' diary. I'll see if the library or Robin G. or someone has anything on Irvine.

-Amorette
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Posted by Kenny Vail (+111) 20 years ago
Thanks Amorette. I appreciate you looking into it.

I now have evidence of 5 different gunfights in Miles City between 1877 and 1880, but there seems to be no documentation of who made the arrests; the Constable or the Sheriff's Dept. I have the chronology worked out and know who the incumbant officers were at those times but cannot connect them to any arrests. Even the one highly publicized gunfight in 1880 between Bill Reece and Doc Lebscher doesn't mention the officers. I am hoping Tom Irvine mentions at least one in his diary, because I believe he was involved with two.

Kenny
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11984) 20 years ago
So far, we're coming on blank on the Irvine diary. Robin had me check a possible source but no luck. Esther the Upstairs Librarian "retired" but I may ask her if she knows. Her replacement is clueless. The state historical society or the Deer Lodge museum may have copies. Robin also had someone else she was going to check with. So. . .short of a seance, I don't know if we can find out where Dr. Hoopes saw the diary.

--Amorette
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Posted by Kenny Vail (+111) 20 years ago
Amorette,

I really appreciate the effort that was put forth in my regard. I hadn't even thought about the Historical Society in Helena. I keep getting this mental block about accessing Helena. Something to do with physical logistics, I guess. Thanks for the tip on Deer Lodge, also. That might be just the 'ticket' because Tom Irvine was not an obscure Montana lawman. He was a more prominant one. Why, that guy used to do some trick-shooting at a cigar, with his own Undersheriff holding the cigar in his mouth!!

Kenny
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Posted by Laura K. Jones (+29) 20 years ago
To Ken Vail,

I noticed you are writing a book about Miles City and referred to "the spring of 1879" as being relevant to your story. What kind of a book are you writing?

I am writing an historical novel most of which is set in Miles City from 1878 to 1910. I agree with Amorette Allison, Miles City is a pretty fascinating place. It is pretty amazing no one has yet written a book about it.

Laura Jones
Corvallis, Oregon
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Posted by Kenny Vail (+111) 20 years ago
Hello Laura Jones,

I am writing the biography on an adventurous young man named Morgan S. Earp who became nationally famous (along with 2 brothers) for an infamous bit of police work that turned sour in 1881 at Tombstone, A.T. Morgan and his frontier (common-law) wife were in Montana for parts of two and one half years. As an itinerant gambler/gunman who did various stints as a policeman in about 4 different states, his name does not appear in Loopes' book. Nor do any other professional gamblers who followed "the circuit." I can prove he was in Miles City in June, 1878, after coming to Montana from Deadwood in the fall of '77. But I am trying to establish that the couple came through a second time in the spring of '79 on their way to Butte where he did another short stint as a policeman.

There are pertinent files from 1928 existing in The Huntington Library in San Marino, Ca. that strongly suggest Morg engaged in a gunfight in Miles City. I have only the last name of his supposed opponent. No date. No details. However, thanks to Lorman L. Hoopes, I now have a great clue as to whom the victim was.

May I ask what your novel is about? And have you availed yourself to the historical information contained in said book?

Kenneth Vail
Santa Clarita, Ca.

P.S. Is the "Spruce Goose" still in McMenville?
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11984) 20 years ago
We may have a lead on the Irvine diary. At one time, my mother saw a photocopy of a small book she thinks was Tom Irvine's journal. It was in the possession of local historian who is, unfortunately, now in the same state as Dr. Hoopes. His widow and/or son may be able to help. I've been busy at the office and we have company at home but I hope that by early next week, I can get you some info. We're working on it!

--Amorette

P.S. Robin Gerber, who teaches Miles City history classes at the local community college, may be taking next summer off from teaching to write a history of Miles City! I plan to help.
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Posted by Robin Gerber (+41) 20 years ago
Hi all. Amorette has ALREADY helped greatly, as I am currently in the 'packrat' stage of writing, which means I'm gathering all my research sources about me like a squirrel stores nuts, and Amorette always has some wonderful source that she copies for me.

Anyway, I had a thought on this topic of gunfights in old MC. There is extant a jail register that starts in 1881. If the people you are researching were arrested after that date, they should show up in the register.

Do you want us to check it out for you??
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Posted by Kenny Vail (+111) 20 years ago
Thank you Robin but no, my research is focused strictly from mid-1877 to mid-1879. But, do I understand correctly that the diary of Tom Irvine may still be existing somewhere and can be tracted down?

Kenny
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Posted by Robin Gerber (+41) 20 years ago
The notation in This Last West is the only time I've ever heard anything about an Irvine diary. Frankly, I'm somewhat puzzled.
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Posted by Laura K. Jones (+29) 20 years ago
Hello Kenneth Vail,

Sounds like you are working on an intriguing biography. Mine is a work of historical fiction, so I have a little leeway with the details. My novel begins in 1871 and ends in 1910. My heroine gets to Miles City in 1878 after quite a journey from Pembina, North Dakota where she started out in 1872. The rest of the book from that point on is mostly set in Miles City. I was glad when you mentioned about the gamblers--I thought there were probably gamblers in Miles City but I didn't know for sure.

I do have a copy of the Miles City Centennial Roundup but I don't have a copy of the Lorman L. Hoopes book--sounds like it might be a good investment.

I wish you the best of luck on your research.

Laura Jones
Corvallis, Oregon
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Posted by Laura K. Jones (+29) 20 years ago
Hello Robin Gerber,

I am glad to hear you and Amorette are working on a history of Miles City. I was just talking about Miles City at my writing class last week, describing this wonderful Website and saying that it is really a great little town with a lot of history connected to it. I am surprised that no one has compiled all of the extent information together for an historical volume and now you and Amorette are doing it. Congratulations! I look forward to being able to purchase a copy when it gets printed.

Laura Jones
Corvallis, Oregon
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Posted by Laura K. Jones (+29) 20 years ago
Hello again, Mr. Vail

I forgot to tell you. The "Spruce Goose" is still in McMinnville. They've built an air museum there although the Goose is too big for a museum!

Laura Jones
Corvallis, Oregon
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Posted by Kenny Vail (+111) 20 years ago
Thanks for the response, Laura. Does your heroin travel the whole distance from Pembina to M.C. by overland route, or does she catch a steamer in Bismarck? I just remembered; gamblers "worked" the riverboats as well as the saloons and gambling halls. There is a memoir of M.C. resident (Mrs. Frank D. Baldwin) who arrived there by riverboat from Sioux City, Iowa in 1878. She described "professional gamblers on board who nightly fleeced many of the men." There was also a big scare for a few days as "road agents" were expected of possibly staging a robbery of the steamer, "Silver City." An Army paymaster was carrying payroll to Fort Keogh. However, I suppose if your girl traveled by land, the dangers were much more perilous.

Kenny
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