Perfect Prime Rib??
Posted by Mary McClarty (+86) 12 years ago
Any prime rib experts out there with sage advise for fixing that perfect prime rib?
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+16690) 12 years ago
After watching the episode, I followed Alton Brown's instructions last Christmas. Dry-aging is the key. It came out perfect.

http://www.foodnetwork.co...index.html
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Posted by Shu (+1787) 12 years ago
Right here, Mary!

- First, pat the roast down with a mix of minced garlic and fresh-ground black pepper.

- Preheat the oven to 500 degrees, place the rib roast bone-side down in the pan and roast, uncovered, for 15 minutes to sear the outside.

- Then lower the oven temperature to 325 and roast it at 15 minutes per pound. Using a meat thermometer, check the temperature: if you like the prime rib rare, take it out of the oven at 120 degrees. If you like it more medium, stop at 130. Closer to well? go to 140 (but I don't think well-done does justice to prime rib...that makes it less juicy)...these temperatures may seem low, BUT...

- after you take it out of the oven, cover the roast with aluminum foil (not tightly, just make a "tent" over the roast), and let it sit for about 20 minutes. This will allow the roast to "carry-over cook", meaning it continues to cook internally for a bit.

This is simple, but AWESOME!..by the way, if you don't care for the garlicky taste, just use salt and pepper instead. Hope this helps.
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Posted by Beth Oswald (+276) 12 years ago
Bring the prime rib to room temperature. Rub with Kosher salt and garlic. Preheat oven to 500. Cook for 30 minutes. Turn oven off and DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR NO MATTER WHAT. Leave in oven for two hours or until 140 degrees in the middle of the roast. Use a meat thermometer that you can see with the oven door closed or just trust the two hours. It will be perfectly medium rare.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+14748) 12 years ago
Googling distance from Gillette to NW Montana... I am a "certified" prime-rib taster and can let you know how you did.
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Posted by Cheryl Gaer-Barlow (+479) 12 years ago
Shu, You fix prime rib the exact same way I do, and it always comes out great! I serve it with au jus sauce. But here's something surprising to cook with it, (or put in the last ten minutes). Take apricot halves from a can, sprinkle with nutmeg, brown sugar, cinnamon and a dab of butter in each one. When it browns in the oven, it's a tasty garnish forthe prime rib!
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Posted by Steve Sullivan (+1303) 12 years ago
I had the same question last year and Rick Tobin said to get Paul Prudhome's Prime Rib Rub. Also do everything else that shu says. That should get you there.
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Posted by Steve Sullivan (+1303) 12 years ago
I had the same question last year and Rick Tobin said to get Paul Prudhome's Prime Rib Rub. Of course there are other brands of spice rubs that work very good too. Also do everything else that Shu says including the garlic etc. That should get you there.


I just found his email:

Okay I'm sure I have one in the far reaches of my brain....I don't know how big this animal is that you have(meat) but I usually deal with a 10-15 lb roast and here's the way I always cook it ....pre-heat your oven to 475...take out the prime out of packaging and what not...rub down with olive and/or canola oil...now here's the rub as they say...

Get some paul prudhomme(a personal friend of mine..from New Orleans) redfish magic seasoning at the local store(spice area---there's like 5 kinds but redfish magic works best..rub it on hard..followed by a good dose of coarse pepper and garlic(the chopped stuff in the liquid you get in the produce area of the store)...make sure the fat cap is up(on the top) and don't trim any off..the rub can be on the entire piece of meat-it will cooked fat cap on top....now.in a broasting pan..you know.a rectangular big pan about 3 inches deep..put in the meat....shove into the oven and roast 20 minutes or until the meat is browning to deep caramel color..immediately reduce heat to 225..and roast until an internal meat thermometer(you should invest $4 in an insta-read thermometer)temp is approx 130 for medium rare...remove immediately and let set for approx. 20-30 minutes so the meat re-sucks up a lot of the juices it pushed out during cooking..now slice to order or however most people think they can eat..most of the more well done will be at the ends but the middle 65-70 percent should be Medium to Medium rare..if you want it rarer..pull out at 125 degree internal....you can take the juices in the bottom of the pan and make au jus out of..or pick up a jar of au jus(normally beef soup base) and add water to it.plus about teaspoon of garlic and bring to a boil...2 tbsp of horseradish is great mixed with sour cream(1 cup), 1tbsp worcestershire sauce and ½ tsp of Tabasco.for a horseradish sauce..or just plain horseradish is good too..
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Posted by Mary McClarty (+86) 12 years ago
Thank you, Thank you, Thank you!! I now feel more confident for tomorrow's feast!! Merry Christmas to all of you and I hope Santa brings you all you wish for!! Stay warm!!
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Posted by Donna Kingsley Coffeen (+403) 12 years ago
Kansas City Steak Company delivers right to your door.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+14748) 12 years ago
Mary, I have heard that you should set the roaster pan in the oven on old Oldsmobile muffler bearings. It allow for better heat circulation of the signal light fluid.
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Posted by Mary McClarty (+86) 12 years ago
Thanks Richard!!
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Posted by Kacey (+3152) 12 years ago
I made prime rib for Christmas Day. The au jus still bothers me. How do you get it to be good and flavorful but not greasy? Those package mixes really do have an off taste to them.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9748) 12 years ago
I don't know if ours was perfect - but it was darned tasty. Beef is hard to come by here - so rib roast for Christmas was a special treat.
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Kacey, I agree with on the boughten au jus mixes - they just aren't good.

Here's how I do it. If you want you can skip most of this and just use some canned beef stock, but if you have time to make your own stock, the "jus" will be better.

Stock . . .

Take 4 or 5 pounds of beef bones cut into 2-3 inch long pieces (knuckle, shank, or rib bones) - clean most of the meat from them (save the meat scraps). Brush or rub the bones with a little canola oil. Roast them in a 400 degree oven for around 60 minutes. Take 3 or 4 crushed garlic cloves and the meat scraps you saved, mix then up with a little oil and throw them in the pan with the bones for the last 10 minutes of roasting.

Throw the bones in a stock pot, pick out the garlic cloves and throw the meat scraps in the pot - deglaze the roasting pan with a little cold water and pour it in the stock pot. Add enough cold water to the pot to cover the bones by an inch or so.

Bring the pot to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer the bones for 2-3 hours - skim the surface regularly to remove the foam / scum. Keep the water level about the same as when you started.

After the simmer is done - remove the bones and strain the fluid. Chill the fluid, and then skim the surface film. At this point you have a good basic brown stock.**


Au Jus . . .

Put the stock in a pot and bring it to a boil - boil it until it's reduced by at least 50%.

When your rib roast has been removed from the roaster and set aside to rest, drain the grease from the pan. Be sure to save the meat juices though - set them aside.

Deglaze the pan - I like to use 1/4 cup of light brandy (wine works too - for those who don't cook with alcohol, water or lemon juice works too) .

Add a couple cups of the reduced stock to the deglazed roaster and bring it to a furious boil.

Now, depending on now you prepared the rib roast, the meat juices you saved may or may not be salty - taste them and get a feel for that. Begin adding them to the boiling stock in the roaster - if the juices aren't too salty add then all - if they are salty, just add enough to season the au jus to your taste. When it tastes right - remove it from the heat and it's ready to serve with the roast.

If the au jus gets a little thick, add some water.

Some folks add things like Worcestershire or soy sauce to it, some add powdered mustard or other seasonings or herbs - that's your call.

As I said you can use canned beef stock - it's definitely faster and simpler. I find that canned beef stock can taste a little harsh. One way to deal with that is to go with 3 parts beef and 1 part chicken stock, that seems to smooth the flavor out a bit.
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**You can also roast some aromatics with the bones (onions, carrots, etc) and then add them to the stock pot too - you can also add an herb sachet to the stock pot too during the boil. But if I'm making the stock to use for au jus, I like to keep it focused on the beef flavors.
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Posted by Mary McClarty (+86) 12 years ago
I am VERY LATE in telling you THANK YOU for the Perfect Prime Rib advise - it turned out excellent!! I used bits and pieces of the advice and recipes and it worked!! Miles City.com Prime Rib ROCKS!!
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Posted by Kacey (+3152) 12 years ago
I have perfected my au jus sauce. Herb Ox beef bouillion with onion salt, cracked black pepper, salt and a touch of garlic. It's easy and I used it again with leftover beef steak. Made it taste like prime!
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