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Posted by Van (+560) 15 years ago
I Heard that there is a new Barbecue Ribs Restaurant opening up in the Old Chamber-Kimbal building next to Riverside Convenance Gas Station. A Rib Run would be a wonderful thing. Has anyone heard anything about this or who is opening it? I am getting hungry just talking about it. Finally Barbecue in Miles City, WOW.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+9770) 15 years ago
I've noticed some work on the place but haven't heard what is going in. There used to be a great rib place in Belgrade. Monkey Don's. He sold beef ribs, pork ribs and barbecue chicken, and key lime pie for dessert. That's all. Good eatin'

Amorette
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Posted by Tucker Bolton (+3083) 15 years ago
I have also heard rumors about a mexican place opening in the Olive. Anyone else or just wishful thinking?
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Posted by Sara (pelletier) Kellum (+63) 15 years ago
i also heard that!

[This message has been edited by Sara (pelletier) Kellum (edited 10/17/2004).]
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Posted by carla waters (+22) 15 years ago
Smoked brisket, barbeque ribs, and other goodies. It's not just a rumor.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+9770) 15 years ago
Steve was chatting with the owner today. They hope to be open before Thanksgiving. Limited menu and seating but it sounds darn good! I got the whole lowdown on the interior decoration, the type of smoker, the owner's research into what spices Montanans prefer. (He's from Louisiana and his ideal spice rub was bit zippy for us northerners.)

All sounds fantastic and I can hardly wait! So what if my choleterol is high and I'm having chest pains. I hope they have pork ribs. Yum.

Amorette
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Posted by Bill (+30) 15 years ago
I love ribs joints and excited to hear one is coming. I worked the kitchen in a real rib joint, Nothing against the Stagecoach as I worked there once too, but they never really did it right. So tell more, how many bbq sauces can I choose from? Perhaps a little mesquite, Mamas Spicy BBQ, Dads Burnin Hot, or sweet molassis and brown sugar, perhaps a mustard based, yum yum yum

[This message has been edited by Bill (edited 10/25/2004).]
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+13655) 15 years ago
>>the owner's research into what spices Montanans prefer

...and that would be...none at all?

So, what kind of wood is he going to use in the smoker?
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+14076) 15 years ago
Artemesia Tridentata - Big Sagebrush
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Posted by Bob L. (+5040) 15 years ago
Question:

Did the gentleman who is opening this restaurant used to work at the Cattle-ac?

I seem to remember a guy from Louisiana working at the Cattle-ac, figured there aren't more than a few Cajuns in MC...
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+9770) 15 years ago
Steve talked to him so I only got the highlights. I believe the guy is getting mesquite shipped in. He did some research into how much he expected to need and has it ordered. I don't know if there will be an assortment of sauces. Don't know if he worked at the Cattle AC but I know he has been investigating restaurants and ribs in MT for three years and has been catering barbecue for a while. I'll try to ask Steve for more info at lunch.

Amorette
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+9770) 15 years ago
Steve didn't know if the guy worked at the Cattle AC or not. It's not the chef who worked there. According to Steve, the chef at the Cattle AC was upscale Cajun and the Bodacious Ribs guy is low country barbecue.

Sides will be homemade potato salad, baked beans and corn on the cob. (He might have trouble getting that last one year round.) No dessert on the theory if dinner is good enough, you won't have any room. No beer/wine license but delivery and pick up so you can buy your own beer.

Be nice to get some ribs on the way to Denton Field or to eat in Riverside Park.

I can hardly wait. (Don't tell my Dr. that. Some darn thing about cholesterol and heart attack scare and all that nonsense.)

Amorette
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+13655) 15 years ago
This is indeed good news. I will most definitely check it out when I am back for the Thanskgiving holidays, if it is opened by then. I am a complete barbecue snob, however, so it better be good!

Mesquite is my wood of choice for beef brisket (there are a few Miles Citians out there who can attest to the quality of my brisket, which I smoke over mesquite for 12-14 hours). Nothing better. It is also very good for chicken and hot links, although I am little skeptical of its utility to pork ribs - hard to beat hickory for that.

Other favorite wood choices:

Pork tenderloin = apple
Turkey breast = maple
Salmon = alder
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+9770) 15 years ago
What? No cottonwood?

Amorette
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Posted by Van (+560) 15 years ago
They are using Mesquite wood. I have used apple wood for many a rib. It is a good sweet flavor.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+9770) 15 years ago
I don't know. I think Richard and I may have something. A sagebrush/cottonwood smoker. Yeah, it will stink but who knows, it might be great?

Okay, it would be AWFUL. All I know is I am looking forward to some good ribs!!!!!! (And ignoring my chest pains.)

Amorette
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+13655) 15 years ago
Amorette: You do not need to rely on restaraunt ribs to satisfy your cravings. Here is a recipe from PBS's "America's Test Kitchen" that I have tried that has produced ribs equal to any that I have had in restaraunts:

Barbecued Baby Back Ribs on a Charcoal Grill
Serves 4
For a potent spice flavor, brine and dry the ribs as directed, then coat them with the spice rub, wrap tightly in plastic, and refrigerate overnight before grilling. You will need two wood chunks, each about the size of a lemon, for this recipe.

brine
1 cup kosher salt or 1?2 cup table salt
1/2 cup sugar
2 racks (about 2 pounds each) baby back or loin back ribs

spice rub
1 tablespoon plus 1?2 teaspoon sweet paprika
1 1/2 teaspoons chili powder
1 3/4 teaspoons ground cumin
1 1/2 teaspoons dark brown sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt or 3?4 teaspoon table salt
3/4 teaspoon dried oregano
3/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground white pepper
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1. To brine ribs: Dissolve salt and sugar in 4 quarts cold water in stockpot or large plastic container. Submerge ribs in brine and refrigerate 1 hour until fully seasoned. Remove ribs from brine and thoroughly pat dry with paper towels.

2. While ribs are brining, cover two 3-inch wood chunks with water in medium bowl; soak wood chunks for 1 hour, then drain and set aside. Combine spice rub ingredients in small bowl. When ribs are out of brine and dried, rub each side of racks with 1 tablespoon spice rub; refrigerate racks 30 minutes.

3. To barbecue ribs: Open bottom vents on grill. Ignite large chimney starter filled three-quarters with charcoal briquettes (about 41?2 quarts, or 65 briquettes) and burn until covered with thin coating of light gray ash. Empty coals into one side of grill, piling them up in mound two or three briquettes high. Place wood chunks on top of charcoal. Put cooking grate in place and cover grill with lid. Let grate heat for 5 minutes, then scrape clean with wire brush.

4. Arrange ribs on cool side of grill parallel to fire; cover, positioning lid so vents are opposite wood chunks to draw smoke through grill (grill temperature should register about 350 degrees on grill thermometer, but will soon start dropping). Cook for 2 hours, until grill temperature drops to about 250 degrees, flipping rib racks, switching their position so that rack that was nearest fire is on outside, and turning racks 180 degrees every 30 minutes; add 10 fresh briquettes to pile of coals. Continue to cook (grill temperature should register 275 to 300 degrees on grill thermometer), flipping, switching, and rotating ribs every 30 minutes, until meat easily pulls away from bone, 1 1/2 to 2 hours longer. Transfer ribs to cutting board, then cut between bones to separate ribs; serve.

Me again: Just buy your favorite barbecue sauce from the grocery store to slather on the ribs AFTER they are done. I prefer KC Masterpiece Original.
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