Inspirational Coaches and Teachers from CCDHS
Posted by MT Fan (+16) 14 years ago
Who has inspired you?
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Posted by Kacey (+3161) 14 years ago
Bob Southall, Harold Boe, Clint Fretland
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+18248) 14 years ago
Ted Nugent.
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Posted by Schmitz - Matt (+404) 14 years ago
Inspired by Ted Nugent? I think I better just shut up and go away with no comment.
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Posted by Anna (+334) 14 years ago
JACK LARSON!!
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Posted by Jeremy Orthman (+436) 14 years ago
Mrs. Annalora was always a very good and creative teacher. She good come up with a whole lesson based on a students conversation at the beginning of class.
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Posted by Bruce Wilson (+54) 14 years ago
I (and scores of others) learned more from Ralph Hartse than all other teachers combined. We not only learned music, we learned skills that we would carry with us for the rest of our lives.
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Posted by Frank Hardy (+1728) 14 years ago
Yes,

Like how to sell candy bars door to door. Always a valuable skill.

Cheers!
FH
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Posted by jkuhl (+83) 14 years ago
Mr. and Mrs. Annalora both were the most inspirational teachers for me at CCDHS. They really knew how to keep us in line,too!
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+18248) 14 years ago
Ooops....I mis-read the title of this thread. Sorry. Ted Nugent was someone who inspired me while I was in high school; certainly, he was not a CCDHS teacher. My bad.

Can't say any teacher ever inspired me at CCDHS, although Howard Letke was certainly the best conveyor of subject matter and was highly entertaining too boot.

Most of my inspiration during HS days came from my family.
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Posted by spacekace (+897) 14 years ago
Dan Stanton...
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Posted by Donna Kingsley Coffeen (+400) 14 years ago
If it weren't for Mrs. Shipley and her quizzing us on Latin and Greek roots, I would not have known to subject my own students to this ritual daily for the last 10 years. First thing every morning! Mine like it. They say it makes them feel smart. Most of my students are remedial.
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Posted by Dan Mowry (+1439) 14 years ago
El Sepremo (Howard Letke), Cary Veis, Heidi Yoder/Healy, Jon Polich, Scott Andrews, Scott Jens, John Potts.

Howard taught me more than I thought I was capable of learning - he made it interesting. I really can't say enough about Howard.

Cary inspired me with his enthusiasm for fitness and the manner he dealt with us boys. He treated us like men - like he just assumed we could live up to expectation and knew how to do better. He pushed us as if he had total confidence we'd succeed - even if we didn't think we would. Pretty awesome.

Heidi Yoder (had her during her first year teaching at CCDHS). She actually taught me history! Don't get me wrong - Howard taught me a lot but it was information overload and really didn't sink in until years later. Heidi actually tricked me into learning and retaining information and I got my first decent grade in a history class because of it. She understood how us "right brainers" learned things differently.

Jon Polich - a lot like Cary Veis - just a strong, role model that was good at shaping us up into young men. I got my first experiences of enjoying weight lifting from him. Of all the types of classes/teachers one might expect to be a little light in the substance department - I learned a great deal from Veis and Polich about character.

Scott Andrews - frankly, the guy cut me slack when I didn't deserve it. He let me have a lot of latitude, too, in his audio-visual film club and trusted me with a lot of expensive and fragile equipment day after day filming wrestling, football, basketball, you name it. There's no earthly reason he should have given me the breaks he did but he seemed to figure I was worth the risk. I learned a bit more about helping one live up to potential from him - more than I would have without him as a teacher.

Scot Jens - what can I say? I'm 38 with a spotless driving record. ha ha. I'd like to think he'd be proud of that. Seriously, he was a good driver's ed instructor (exceedingly patient) but managed to make me appreciate science more. I remember thinking he was one of the few teachers that would sit and chat with me as if I was /gasp/ a regular, grown-up person! ha ha - we had some wonderful conversations and he never made me feel like a [email protected]@ teenager.

John Potts - he was like a Mythbuster/Science-Guy before they were on TV. He was very cool how he took the practical approach to science. I built my first radio, bridge, launchable rocket, and even telescope because of him. Not bad - he was very cool about hands-on science and I guarantee I learned more because of it.

I feel bad - I might be missing someone but it's only because I haven't had enough coffee and I'm sleep deprived as it is. ha ha
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Posted by Richard G Flor (+213) 14 years ago
Rhoda Hanson, Ralph Hartse and Mrs. Babcock
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Posted by Valerie Pachl (+64) 14 years ago
Alan Folsom - He is the reason I survived High School and became who I am today! I will never forget him or that transmission my senior year!!!! What an adventure.
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Posted by James (+96) 14 years ago
Jim Michles- One of the all time greastest teachers and a true gentleman.
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Posted by Mike Zier (+134) 14 years ago
Ok, here's my two cents:
Mr. Potts: Now, Mr. Potts scared the hell out of me. I did like his projects that he made us do. My favorite was when we measured the size of the school with a string--Some kid cut one of the strings, I thought mr. Potts head was going to explode.

Mr. Reagan (SP) now we spent some good time in the ole vice principals office--he always managed to get me going down the right path again.

Mr. Armstrong--Had a ball in this class although my buddy Wade Miller basically made all my "projects" for me because I sucked. He had a classic poster "I may be fat but I can diet but you'll still be ugly" or something like that.

But I would have to say the best IMO was Coach Jerry Partridge. Since I'm a football coach and a history teacher I guess you could say that he was my role model.

Oh and Mrs. Marum---She would have us do projects and such. I would have to say with Coach Raymond, Mrs. Annalore, and Mrs. Marum I would look forward to English/Lit classes.

Coaches Rohloff, Veis, Polich, and Plowman would make the second team.
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Posted by Jeff Newby (+153) 14 years ago
I would have to say for me it was Jack Larson and Jack Raymond. They always seemed to know how to get me to focus and achieve my goals.
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Posted by Dana Jablinske (+86) 14 years ago
I would have to say Mr. Michels - I never had him as a teacher (back then they didn't allow GIRLS in the farm shop) He's had a great influenece on my life back then and now....

Mr. Walden - always kept me in line and said he'd "kick my butt" if I got out of line... He still says that, but then gives me a BIG HUG

Ms. Buchanan - even though I didn't think so at the time - I'm sure glad she pushed me to do my best in everything I do...

And of course Mr. Letke -- great teacher and a wonderful person. I really miss him....

Dana
Class of 1981
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+15369) 14 years ago
"I would have to say Mr. Michels - I never had him as a teacher (back then they didn't allow GIRLS in the farm shop) He's had a great influenece on my life back then and now.... "

Hmm... I remember you hanging around the farm shop quite a bit.


I would have to vote for Mr. Michel's as well. He is the personification of leadership and inspiring people to achieve more than they thought possible. "you boys had better get your act together or we are going to go study chickens." And my favorite Mr. Michels quote: "You officers should be demonstrating some leadership by asking the girls to dance."
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Posted by mule deer hunter (+31) 14 years ago
I would have to say MR. Raymond, Mr Veis, and Mrs. Plowman. They put up with alot of junk from me and they pushed me to never quite. They didn't deserve the hell in out them threw and I apologize for that. I really liked Mr Armstrong even though we had lot of differances in opinion he was a good teacher.

[This message has been edited by mule deer hunter (edited 2/25/2008).]
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+15369) 14 years ago
" They put up with alot of junk from me and they pushed me to never quite. They didn't deserve the hell in out them threw and I apologize for that."

I'm guessing this is your "sloppy copy" or "rough draft".
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Posted by Bob Netherton (+1882) 14 years ago
Maybe he actually talks like that, Richard.
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Posted by Dan Mowry (+1439) 14 years ago
Ah, thanks for the reminder - yes - Dee Walden. Many fond memories of donut runs in his drafting classes. I was really surprised he was able to coax out of me the ability to get into something so technical as drafting at that age. My math skills certainly wouldn't have given him reason to think I could pull it off - but he managed to help get me there.
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Posted by Levi Forman (+3714) 14 years ago
Jack Larson, Roberta Horton, and Myra Annalora were probably my favorite teachers at CCDHS. The former because of all his speeches to the freshmen in ag class and all the stuff I got to do in FFA, and the latter two because they introduced me to the world of literature which I still greatly appreciate.

Honorable mention to Jerry Partridge, who gave the best lectures I ever heard in high school, and John Polich whose advanced PE classes taught me that pushing myself physically could be a good thing. It's interesting to see so many people mention Cary Veis because I always hated him hehe, but that probably had more to do with the fact that I was a chubby, uncoordinated, and unmotivated participant in his classes who had not yet made the aforementioned discovery about physical exertion. Thinking back it's really a miracle that I ever made it to advanced PE with how much I disliked freshman and sophomore PE, but I am very glad that I took it now.

[This message has been edited by Levi Forman (edited 2/26/2008).]
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Posted by KDA (+15) 14 years ago
I pulled out my yearbooks to put a face to some of these names. Why do I not see a Mr. Michels in the Branding Irons from the early eighties (81, 82, 83)?

[This message has been edited by KDA (edited 2/26/2008).]

[This message has been edited by KDA (edited 2/26/2008).]
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Posted by Dana Jablinske (+86) 14 years ago
I believe Mr. Michels retired from teaching in 1981. He is still very active selling tractors, antiques and junk parts along with dancing and politics.....

I tried to attach a picture of him, but I can't figure out how to do that on this site.... can anyone help me that?

Thanks Dana
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+15369) 14 years ago
I can.
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Posted by mule deer hunter (+31) 14 years ago
Sorry I was tired and I dont type very well. I meant to say they didn't deserve the poop I put them threw, but they never let me quite or take the easy way out. I apologize for being a difficult student.
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Posted by Bill Freese (+481) 14 years ago
I remember years ago reading something someone had written praising their favorite teacher, a person who I had found wildly boring. In the teaching trade, one of the things we must always remember is that different techniques reach different students.

Many of my favorites are already mentioned here. I will add Dunc Skinner who was, I admit, not to everyone's taste. As for Jerry Partridge, he was the fellow who said to me, "Freese, you're not so smart. You just know how to take tests." Some days I think he was wrong.

[This message has been edited by Bill Freese (edited 2/27/2008).]
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Posted by Maryann McDaniel (+251) 14 years ago
Recognize several of these names from the 1960s -- Duncan Skinner -- remember his flattop haircut; Mrs. Shipley and her son Ralph who went to school with me; Ralph Hartse -- never was a musician; Jim Michels.

Favorite memories are of Mr. Albrecht, who was always fair and attentive to student needs; of my favorite Irene Hoffman, who told me in 1965, "you should be a geometry teacher," which at age 50 I became. I wish she were alive today to see me receiving my doctorate in curriculum and instruction, mathematics education, in 2008 at age 60 years. Long time coming, but was what I should have done much earlier....

Maryann Mahoney Siegmyer McDaniel, Class of 1966
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Posted by Shu (+1796) 14 years ago
Scott Jens, eh?

I never attended Custer High, but we Sacred Heart kids did get sent to Custer for driver's ed...Mr. Jens was a good teacher, but he seemed too interested in flexing his biceps when stading at the chalkboard, I think.

I had Pete Stabio for the actual driving part - liked him quite a bit. He was gentle and helped me stay calm at the wheel...I appreciated that he didn't "bark" at his students. He was always calm even when the student driver made a mistake.
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Posted by Bob Netherton (+1882) 14 years ago
Pete Stabio was a great teacher. He sometimes regaled us with stories of the Broadus Italian ghetto.
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Posted by J. Dyba (+1340) 14 years ago
I remember Mr. Horton asking me on the second to last day of my senior year to "Please do us all a favor and just get the f*ck out of here".

Mr. and Mrs. Annalora were both ridiculously good teachers. Mr. Annalora had the amazing ability of making you want to succeed for him. I think he was one of the few teachers that saw through my facade and called me on my bullsh*t in a constructive manner that allowed me to produce great results for him.
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Posted by Levi Forman (+3714) 14 years ago
I guess I should mention Dee Sutter's short story class too. I have fond memories of that class and I am still a fan of short stories as well.
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Posted by Bridgier (+9469) 14 years ago
I had fifth period Intro To Technology with Mr. Armstrong - right next to the choir room during the same period as girls choir.

One day while they were doing their scales or warm-ups or whatever it's called, Mr. Armstrong turns to us and says - "Boy, sure sounds like Mr. Annalora's got his hands up their skirts doesn't it?"

I only had Mr. Annalora for Humanities my senior year, but I think I had a class with Mrs. Annalora at least once a year from my sophmore year forward.

I always liked how she let us do whatever we wanted as long as it was "creative", which usually meant some sort of video project. The best of these involved pouring gasoline in the Tounge River and lighting it afire to simulate one circle of hell or another. Most of these "projects" involved firearms to one degree or another, something that would probably be frowned upon today - particularly the one where we pretended to execute various political figures deemed "Un-American", complete with a ketchup bottle for special effects and someone firing blanks behind the camera. It was right up the alley of some of the commentators here, but no one had the balls at them time to actually turn in a snuff film.

A large portion of the male population found Ms. Anderson's sophmore english class very inspiring as well.

[This message has been edited by Bridgier (edited 2/28/2008).]
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Posted by Bob Zadow (+76) 14 years ago
I had the pleasure of working in Social Services at Holy Rosary when Bob Southall was terminally ill. Even in his illness Bob remained a teacher and a counselor. He walked us all through the stages of his illness and provided more information about the end of life than any course or publication could have provided. This instruction included the doctors, nurses and any other staff he had contact with. After he died, his wonderful wife and daughter presented me with a tobacco pipe that was to be his last Christmas present. It has a permanent place on my bookshelf and is one of my treasures. He in fact passed over the day after Christmas which I think he planned so his family could be with him one last Christmas. I have used what he taught me every time I deal with an individual or family that is facing terminal illness. I was blessed to have had his friendship and his wise and kindly counsel.
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Posted by Ken Ziebarth (+322) 14 years ago
I especially remember Mr. Boe's senior literature class, that started me on reading habits I still have.
And of course Mr. Hartse for encouraging the music habits that take up so much of my life and income.
But I only saw one mention of any of the 'I' women, Inge Hanson (Latin), Ina Olson (Algebra), and Irene Hoffman (Geometry). All of them encouraged my understanding of rationality and logical thought.
Ken Ziebarth (1960).
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+18248) 14 years ago
Mr. Jens was a good teacher, but he seemed too interested in flexing his biceps when stading at the chalkboard, I think.

Damn....one shouldn't make one spew beer out of one's nose on the keyboard like that....I have not heard that old chestnut in 25 years, at least!

Someone should bring up what an expert dog trainer Mr. Jens was, just for historic reference.....
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Posted by spacekace (+897) 14 years ago
...Not only did Mr. Jens flex his biceps... but can anyone recall the color of his REAL hair??? And, did he get a new hairpiece after it flew out the window of the drivers ed car???!!!!!! Or did he have to search the side streets?? And, also... I wonder how many hours was spent while he was taking students driving that they actually sat in the car, while he was telling "hunting" stories in Red Rock...?
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Posted by Chris Gamrath (+387) 14 years ago
The Annalora's were definatly the most inspirational in my time at C.C.D.H.S. Having read Bridgier's post about Mrs Annorlora's class, I'm slowly remembering every video we had the oppurtunity to watch that was shown period after period. It generally involved Ryan Rebsom and various collections of his friends doing God knows what, to whomever was the chosen one, and never having to explain why... the laughter of the entire class said it all. I often wondered if basketball really would win out over being the next Quentin Tarentito of Miles City!!

Anybody who's taken choir in the last 20+ years knows and understands just what a blessing we've been given to have "Mr A." as a teacher. He made highschool more then just "survivable" for me; he made it fun. Show me a person who can instill confidence in a kid, and I'll show you a person who's earned their respect for life.
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Posted by D Elwood (+49) 14 years ago
What about Mr. Tracy, he was a racehorse trainer when he was'nt teaching. And Mrs. Boe was a great councelor and Mr. Zinne was in counceling. We girls will never forget Ruth Wendelberg, I won't say she was inspirational but you knew where she stood and expected the best of everybody. I don't know how many years she taught, but she was there along time and was probably in better shape than many of the other teachers. Mr. Dickson was probably the funnest teacher I had, besides Mr. Tracy.

[This message has been edited by D Elwood (edited 3/29/2008).]
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Posted by urcrackinmeup (+136) 14 years ago
I remember one time we were dissecting fetal pigs in Mr. Jens' Biology class. One day Mr. Jens went out to the drinking fountain to get a drink - and to flex his muscles - and he found fetal pig parts in the fountain. Someone had sneaked them out of class to gross out some unsuspecting students. Mr. Jens went ballistic. We were all trying not to laugh but it was hard.
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Posted by GLM (+68) 14 years ago
Anybody remember Gary Martin?
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Posted by 58softtail (+205) 14 years ago
Would any of these teachers or coaches be willing to donate their valuable time to sit at a dunk tank at the "Eastern Montana Classic" bike show and dance at the fairgrounds on July 26th,2008? If so please get in touch with me...
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Posted by Shu (+1796) 14 years ago
Gary and Marlys Martin, yes, I remember them both. Marlys actually taught a year at Sacred Heart, I think, before transferring to Custer...nice lady. I never had Gary as a teacher, but he seemed like a good fellow. I think they ended-up in Livingston, but am not positive about that.
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Posted by Bob Netherton (+1882) 14 years ago
I think Gary's favorite admirer was Gary.
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Posted by Doug and Sami (+202) 14 years ago
My Favorite and probally the one that has helped me the most with everyday living is Jack Larson! I still look up to hom and respect him!
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