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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+18256) 2 months ago
I made my favorite turkey leftover dinner tonight.. Turkey green chile enchiladas!One hindquarter was all I needed (dark meat is the best for turkey enchiladas).

What's everyone's favorite way to use up the leftover turkey? This year, I cooked a 14.5 lb Hutterite turkey following a NYT recipe, that called for a dry brine and a herbed mayonnaise coating. I will not repeat that mistake again. My wife threw out the carcass so the usual turkey soup has been scratched. We did do turkey cheddar bacon omelettes, they rocked.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+12382) 2 months ago
I saw a mayonnaise coating once and went nope. Stick to butter.
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Posted by Tucker Bolton (+3857) 2 months ago
Throw it out as quickly as possible. If not, before it is served.
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Posted by Richard Bonine (+15372) 2 months ago
You WASTED green chile on turkey 🦃? Do you also buy your picante sauce from hipsters in NYC? 🤠
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+18256) 2 months ago
To me, green chile and turkey is a match made in heaven. Both originated in the southwestern U.S. I pretty sure the Anasazi combined turkey and green chile a thousand years ago.

The mayo turkey recipe was from the NYT, which usually has solid recipes.

https://cooking.nytimes.c...rch&rank=1

Strike 1, the recipe called for spatchcocking the turkey, which is trivial to do for a chicken, but a PITA for a turkey (I broke the tip of a cleaver trying to remove the keelbone, the wife was less than impressed.

Strike 2, the recipe called for dry brining the bird with a half cup of kosher salt. Waaay too much salt, and I like salty things like anchovies.

Strike 3, the mayo on the skin resulted in soggy skin. Crispy skin is the best part of a turkey. To end up with soggy skin is soo disappointing.

Three strikes, you're out.
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Posted by Richard Bonine (+15372) 2 months ago
Reply to Gunnar Emilsson (#383875)
Gunnar Emilsson wrote:
To me, green chile and turkey is a match made in heaven. Both originated in the southwestern U.S. I pretty sure the Anasazi combined turkey and green chile a thousand years ago.

The mayo turkey recipe was from the NYT, which usually has solid recipes.

https://cooking.nytimes.c...rch&rank=1

Strike 1, the recipe called for spatchcocking the turkey, which is trivial to do for a chicken, but a PITA for a turkey (I broke the tip of a cleaver trying to remove the keelbone, the wife was less than impressed.

Strike 2, the recipe called for dry brining the bird with a half cup of kosher salt. Waaay too much salt, and I like salty things like anchovies.

Strike 3, the mayo on the skin resulted in soggy skin. Crispy skin is the best part of a turkey. To end up with soggy skin is soo disappointing.

Three strikes, you're out.


You make an excellent point. Turkey isn't one of my personal culinary choices. Green chile would be one of very few methods to make it palatable.

As an aside, and in an attempt to help you be more socially acceptable, the term "Anasazi" is a pejorative in some circles, especially among the Puebloan natives. "Ancestral Puebloan" is a preferred term. The term "Anasazi" didn't exist before 1927 when it was used as an archeology descriptor in the Pecos Classification System. Being as you grew up amongst us rednecks in southeastern Montana, I'll cut you some slack.
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Posted by Kelly (+2818) one month ago
turkey and cheese sandwich
Turkey Tetraziini spelling?
Turkey Vegetables and Dumplings
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Posted by David Schott (+18229) one month ago
Reply to Kelly (#383879)
Turkey pot pie.
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