Another big advantage to a small town
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9719) 24 days ago
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11414) 24 days ago
Not a suburb. An actual small town. That's us.

I remember John Riggs telling me about going to Hallmark convention and explaining that his commute was less than 15 minutes and he walked. Nobody believed him.
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Posted by David Schott (+16459) 24 days ago
I tell my city friends:

* I walked to/from school through all grades (there were no school buses for the city kids).
* I went home from school for lunch as did many students (we had no hot lunch program).
* My parents went home from work for lunch.
* It wasn't unheard of for businesses to effectively close down during the lunch hour so employees could go home for lunch.

For the record, though:

* For most of my time working at Microsoft my commute was less than 5 minutes.
* I almost always went home during my lunch break.
* I still bump into people I know at the grocery store though it's rare rather than common.

So, big city living isn't always that much different than small town living.
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Posted by Earl Bennett (+925) 22 days ago
Reply to David Schott (#382243)
Hey Dave
I tell my city friends:

* I walked to/from school through all grades (there were no school buses for the city kids). "Yep"

* I went home from school for lunch as did many students (we had no hot lunch program). (I ran home grade school, could cook TV dinner, eat it and run back to Lincoln, was the days before microwave, good training for cross country)

* My parents went home from work for lunch. (nope mom always home, dad railroad}

* It wasn't unheard of for businesses to effectively close down during the lunch hour so employees could go home for lunch. (7th grade before split shift I got to eat lunch at Woolworths, mom knew the waitress, 2.5 block walk from Washington school)

For the record, though:

* For most of my time working at HRH my commute was less than 5 minutes. (now 8, 22 walking, My guess you and I have been working same place (yours MS) for awhile).

* I almost always went home during my lunch break. (Short lunch break, always ate cafeteria at hospital)

* I still bump into people I know at the grocery store though it's rare rather than common. (Yep even Bert, not so rare. Can't go for walk without ride offers)

So, big city living isn't always that much different than small town living. (what can I say, this is my Big City )
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+16584) 22 days ago
Reply to Earl Bennett (#382244)
Upvote for mentioning Miles City's most famous citizen.
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Posted by David Schott (+16459) 22 days ago
Reply to Gunnar Emilsson (#382245)
Running into Bert at the grocery store could turn a 15 minute shopping trip into a 60 minute shopping trip.
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Posted by Richard Bonine (+14667) 22 days ago
Sorry... if you have a roundabout, you are no longer a "small town".
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Posted by Forsyth Mike (+478) 21 days ago
Most of my high school career, I ate lunch at the Joseph Cafe (in Forsyth). I would get a burger, crinkle fries and a Pepsi for a dollar. At some point the fries went up by a dime. On Friday nights after I started to work at the movie theatre, I used to go in there on my way to work and I would often eat a "Plain Steak" which was $1.50, and it consisted of a decent-sized steak, crinkle fries, a salad and a drink.

The Joseph is still there but is not the "diner" it used to be... it's been turned into a "fine dining" establishment and it's OK, but man, what I would give for one of those Plain Steaks again.
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