The Cross Roads Inn
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9347) 3 years ago



The menu is from the mid 1970s. From today’s perspective the prices seem amazingly low : -)







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Posted by David Schott (+14444) 3 years ago
The Crossroads opened 75 years ago. Amorette Allison wrote a story in the M.C. Star recently.

Miles City Star: Crossroads was first rate night club
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Posted by Amorette F. Allison (+1908) 3 years ago
I forgot they had frog's legs on the menu! When I was a kid, I remember thinking there were things that I would have to order when I was an adult. Never accomplished the frog's legs. Darn.
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Posted by David Schott (+14444) 3 years ago
I've heard they taste just like chicken.

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Posted by Jack McRae (+364) 3 years ago
No Ranch dressing. Hard to imagine that there was such a time. For some people Ranch goes on every item of food--can probably make frog's legs taste like lettuce instead of chicken.

[Edited by Jack McRae (7/12/2016 9:07:30 PM)]
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+13757) 3 years ago
A brief digression.

In the early 1990s, I traveled to Calaveras County in central California to conduct an environmental assessment of a large gravel pit/processor on behalf of a local company.

This was not your typical small pit opened temporarily for road construction. This was a full-time, fully automated facility intended to supply a significant percentage of the aggregate needs of the central valley.

One of the items of environmental interest I inspected were the sediment ponds below the wash plant. These ponds were huge, full of cattails and other wetland species.

That is where I saw these giant leaping frogs. They were everywhere. And, then it all hit me with the Mark Twain connection.

That was when I resolved to have frog legs for dinner. Where a better place, than Calaveras County? So I went to a local restaurant, and there they were on the menu. When I inquired my server if they were local, she confessed that the locals had depleted the native supply down to next to nothing, so these were farm raised out of state. Might have even been from South America.

Oh well. They were pretty good, but not worth ordering again.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+13757) 3 years ago
And I am impressed that liver and onions is not on the menu.
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Posted by Oddjob (+181) 3 years ago
I still wake up some nights dreaming about the Crossroads chuckwagon buffets. They always put on an excellent spread.

The only edible liver and onions on the planet since Grandma passed, can be found at the Martin Hotel in Winnemucca. NV. On Friday nights, liver and onions used to be the special. The biggest problem with this dish is, that very few know how to cook it, so it's always a risk to order. 99 times out of 100 you will be served something resembling dry sand with onions..

The only places I have encountered that do a descent job with organ meat are Basque Restaurants.
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Posted by gypsykim (+1558) 3 years ago
I grew up on a farm in southeastern Kansas and we had several ponds. We had lots of frogs and one way to control the population was to catch them and fry up the legs. As kids we were always impressed that the legs still "jumped" when you put them in the frying pan. They really do "taste like chicken". Don't knock it if you haven't tried it.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+13757) 3 years ago


I am SO DISAPPOINTED, gk. I always thought you were an animal lover.
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Posted by gypsykim (+1558) 3 years ago
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr. (+14145) 3 years ago
So I guess the frog in Gunnar's cartoon gets around by being toad?
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Posted by David Schott (+14444) 3 years ago
I was in downtown Kirkland this past week and spotted this place which made me think of this discussion.

I guess this place is a cooking school for kids. (Coincidentally, my kid was attending a cooking class in downtown Kirkland but not at this place.)

Frog Legs Culinary Academy, Kirkland
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Posted by Steve Sullivan (+886) 3 years ago
I got my first frog legs on the Blackwater River in Missouri. Yes that one, "Mississippi moon keep on shining."

I twook mwy bb gun dwown two the wiver and hunted those wascally fwogs. I must have been 8 years old. It was huge! My dad cooked it up on our little charcoal grill and it was delicious. Never knew the Crossroads had them.

I learned to play music on a bandstand at the Crossroads from Oliver English,(brother of Willie Nelson's drummer and co-inventor of the Gitorgan). He was the house band for a long time out there.

As a young teenager I remember getting the Cattleman's Cut steak and eating the whole thing. They had to carry me to the car afterward. Huge steak.

Good memories.
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Posted by Hanson (+848) 3 years ago
I'm not sure how or why you went from the historical aspects of Miles City's finest night club to frog legs, however I do have some information on the great club the Ed Love built. For example Ed was Curry Colvin's grandfather. He commissioned the club and my grandfather, Casper Strom, was the architect that built it. I have the original plans from Midland, the company that put it together, including all the plans for the original handmade furniture. It would be great if someone were to rebuild this great club.
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Posted by Oddjob (+181) 3 years ago
If you are the Hanson that put the deal together on the Montana Bar, don't wait for somebody else to pick up that challenge because you will die waiting. You have the plans so start shaming the locals with money into putting up. You see what government has accomplished with the depot.
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Posted by Forsyth Mike (+433) 3 years ago
I miss the days when every restaurant wasn't just trying to "out fancy" the others with their food. When they would just have a nice atmosphere and good quality. I guess those aren't enough these days....gotta stand out from the crowd and create "cuisine."
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