Gazette Guest opinion by Sen. Eric Moore, M.C.
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Posted by David Schott (+13414) 3 years ago
Billings Gazette: Guest opinion: Protecting our daughters from Obama's locker room order



In spite of my rapidly graying and receding hair, sore feet at the end of the day, and the need to wear reading glasses in the shower so I can tell the difference between shampoo and conditioner, I will admit that there are advantages to growing older. Some of these being that you learn to control your temper, see issues from other people's point of view, and not take policy differences personally. Those traits have served me well in three sessions of the Montana Senate.

That being said, the most recent (of many) executive orders by President Obama now dictates that if a boy wants in the girls' locker room with our daughters, we as parents, trustees and teachers are powerless to stop it, less we risk the federal blackmail of the loss of much-needed funds. The idiocy of this policy defies understanding, sympathy or compromise. It would take a book to describe everything wrong with this harebrained idea, so I'll just name the most obvious:

1. Yet again, no debate, no legislation, no court case. King Obama waves his scepter and expects his will shall be carried throughout the land. Even those who might agree with the president's policies should be very concerned at the concentration of executive power under this administration. Tyranny is not much fun when it’s not your person in there.

2. Top down, centralized decisions from D.C. (or Helena) are seldom good ones when it comes to education. And yes, that includes NCLB (No Child Left Behind). Local control is a policy we value in Montana on both sides of the aisle. I wish they did in Washington as well.

3. And most importantly, how stupid is this idea in the first place? As if being a teenage girl isn't hard enough as it is. Even harder now than it was when we children of the ‘70s and ‘80s grew up.

We have cyberbullying, sexting and a myriad of other complications that were the stuff of science fiction 20 years ago. And now Washington proposes to add to these adolescent stresses the requirement to undress in front of a member of the opposite sex. Lunacy.

What added stresses does this put on our teachers and administrators? Are they really supposed to decide which kid is really struggling with his identity and which one just wants in to the girls' locker room? What kind of liability will this decision entail?

I'm not unsympathetic to a child who is having a hard time because he or she has identity problems. The schools should (and for the most part, do) protect kids who are struggling or being bullied because of this or any other issue, and should make reasonable accommodations. What we don't need is a federal mandate creating a special class of student that doesn't have to follow basic rules of a civilized society.

As a father and a state senator, I vow that one of the first bills drafted for the 2017 session will be legislation opposing this foolishness and protecting the safety and security of our daughters.


Frederick "Eric" Moore, R-Miles City, represents Senate District 19.

Link to Billings Gazette article.
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Posted by David Schott (+13414) 3 years ago
Quite a few years ago I was working in a group at a large corporation. There was a guy named "Barney" on our team. One day we went to our weekly team meeting and "Barney" was there sitting at the conference table wearing a dress. Our manager, a retired USAF Lt. Col., said at the start of the meeting, "Okay, first order of business. From now on 'Barney' would like to be called 'Sally'. Please respect 'Sally's' wishes."

That was it. And from that day forward "Barney" was "Sally". I don't recall that it caused any trouble and I don't recall anyone being too concerned about which bathroom "Sally" used. I'm sure it took a lot of courage for "Sally" to do that.

[Note: Those are not the real names used by this person.]
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Posted by Bridgier (+8191) 3 years ago
Oh ffs. I hope I didn't go to school with this dope.

[Edited by Bridgier (5/24/2016 10:15:38 AM)]
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Posted by Amorette F. Allison (+1911) 3 years ago
This letter ran in the Star several days ago. Last night was Morgan Pettis' rebuttal and today someone left another letter etc.

On behalf of women everywhere. . .

We DO NOT worry about being assaulted by a transgender person in the restroom.

We worry about being raped in a parking lot, in our home, at a party, as we walk down a street, whenever we are alone with a male.

You want to protect women. Tell men to stop being rapists and let us pee in peace.
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Posted by Hannah Nash (+2501) 3 years ago
Monday's Rebuttal, in full, with author credit below:

I am writing to make it clear to any transgender students that may come into my classes, that I am not afraid of having you in my classroom. My sense of my own sexuality is not under threat from you. The safety of both the male and female students in my classes in not under threat from you. You and your parents should know that the idea that was recently submitted as a “Guest Opinion” by State Senator Eric Moore to the Billings Gazette, that the students and teachers of the public schools of Montana and the United States are not capable of finding a place for you is destructive, hateful, and beyond the levels of absurdity that we should have to put up with in 2016.

In his most recent letter Sen. Moore put forth a position that the most recent action by President Obama, interpreting current law regarding the civil rights of students in public schools as meaning that transgender students can use the bathroom of their identified gender, put at risk not only every female student in every school in America but also the fabric of of our country. Ignoring the obvious fact that it is the job of the executive branch to interpret and implement the law, Sen. Moore’s childishly peevish way of name calling the President should be beneath our elected representatives. This political cycle has seen a degradation of the way we refer to people of opposing viewpoints and Sen. Moore seems to have no problem taking advantage of the moment. His way of describing our elected representatives would not be tolerated if the President was a member of his own party, so he should not engage in it himself.

I’ve spoken with Sen. Moore and know him to be an intelligent man, so I must assume that his argument is based more on the cynical view of politics that seeks a wedge issue to drive turnout in elections rather than on a view of LGBTQ issues that is grossly ignorant of the facts.

Based on his Op-Ed, Sen. Moore seems to also have a very low opinion of public school teachers. He believes we are so stupid that we would not be able to create a nuanced process that helps a transitioning student get the respect they deserve while also preventing the unlikely event of a student trying to take advantage of a school policy. He seems to believe that instead we would simply allow a student to walk in one morning, say that they are a new gender today and be allowed instant access to locker rooms or bathrooms of the formerly opposite gender. While I do not speak for my school or the district, and so cannot speak to the exact form that procedures would take here, in districts that have formal rules the process of officially changing a person’s gender identity is not simple procedure. It it involves conversations between student, administrators, parents and teachers. Just as the process of changing one’s gender outside of school is not a decision that people make capriciously, neither is that process in a public school. It is also not the disrespectful process that Sen. Moore describes, where a student would be asked to strip in front of anyone. Sen. Moore insists that transgender students strip away a part of who they are and fit into a box that he prescribes to them.

Among the most troubling of boxes that Sen. Moore seems to want to assign to people, are those that he has constructed for teenage boys. Sen. Moore portrays the situation as one where the passions of teenage boys are so uncontrollable that they could be expected at any moment to try and walk into any bathroom and rape someone. Ignoring the fact that aside from having a toilet, bathrooms are the same as every other room, his argument begs several questions. Are our young men not capable of learning to respect and value members of the opposite sex? Does Sen. Moore think that young men should not be expected to control themselves all the time? Does all of the responsibility to rebut unwarranted sexual advances rest on the girls? This is the kind of viewpoint that perpetuates climates where sexual harassment is common and 43% of women will experience sexual violence at some point in their lifetimes (National Sexual Violence Resource Center). In his view young men are not capable of controlling themselves and are simply looking for any opportunity they can to get into a bathroom so they can be with a member of the opposite sex. In the world as presented by Sen. Moore, the only thing people do in bathrooms is stand around and look at each others’ genitals.

Sen. Moore asks what stress the act of making decisions about transgender students puts on me as a teacher. He may be shocked that the answer is none. In fact, it gives me a sense of security that when I need to help protect vulnerable students, students going through some of the most difficult decision making of their lives, that I have the law on my side. He argues that we should take that protection away. He argues that these students who are already marginalized should not be sent a message of compassion and tolerance, but one of fearful division. He argues civil protections for individuals should extend only until someone can imagine a scenario where those protections could be misused, no matter how absurd or far-fetched. He also seems to live in a world where teenagers are so unsophisticated as to be unable to handle discussions of sexuality in mature ways that include respect for all. Sometimes people sit on the wrong side of history. Laws that outlawed blacks and whites using the same bathrooms fell. Laws that prevented interracial marriage, under the guise of protecting women, fell. Laws that prevented the LGBTQ community from being given the respect they deserve fell.

I would ask Sen. Moore to reconsider and not support any legislation that would oppose the Obama administration’s interpretation of this law. But even if he does not reconsider his Quixotic mission against the tide of history, I want to make it very clear that in my classroom everyone will be treated with the respect that they deserve as students and human beings. The mission of the public schools is to provide a place for everyone to feel safe and gain an education that will help them to succeed. Why would we treat transitioning students any differently?

Morgan Pett
Science Instructor, Miles City
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+12887) 3 years ago
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Posted by ZZZzz (-559) 3 years ago
Well then amorette hopefully for you and especially for him no man has ever been alone with you
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Posted by Bob Netherton III (+2335) 3 years ago
Dennis Hastert. THERE'S the type you need to watch out for. Or maybe Jerry Sandusky.

Right Z?
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Posted by Amorette F. Allison (+1911) 3 years ago
ZZZzzz: You ask any woman you know if she worries when she is alone and a strange man comes up behind her on the sidewalk. I guarantee she says she worries.

This is something men do not understand. Women are taught from childhood to be afraid of being assaulted. And we have to protect ourselves because we are the ones who lure men on by having female genitalia.

We are told not to dress "provocatively" because then someone will rape us and it will our fault. We are told if we go to a party and drink alcohol, it is our fault if we are attacked. If we are in a "bad" neighborhood, it is our fault if we are assaulted.

Men do not understand why women don't like cat calling. It's because we interpret it as a threat. That guy wants to do something to me I do not want him to do. He is making me into an object for his sexual pleasure and if my skirt is too short and I am raped, it is my fault.

Ask a woman. She will tell you she fears walking down a street alone at night. She will tell you she doesn't fear the person peeing in the stall next to her. But that strange man in the parking garage? He is a potential rapist. All men are.

[Edited by Amorette F. Allison (5/24/2016 1:40:23 PM)]
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Posted by gypsykim (+1556) 3 years ago
Mr Moore has things so out of context. When I have been in a bathroom stall I have honestly never known the gender of the person next to me and have never cared. He apparently thinks that only men are transgender. Quite frankly I'd be far more concerned for the transgender woman who entered a men's bathroom. I think she would be in far more danger than a woman in a bathroom where a man enters.

Morgan Pett represents the best of the teachers in our schools. He has compassion for students and will do whatever he can to protect all students.

Our children face many dangers in their lives. Teaching them to respect each other is the most important thing we can do.

And finally, does he not understand that transgender men are absolutely not interested in women?
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Posted by David Schott (+13414) 3 years ago
Reply to gypsykim (#366710)
gypsykim wrote:
Morgan Pett represents the best of the teachers in our schools.

You got that right, "gypsykim". Mr. Pett led a Miles City team that won at regionals in the National Science Bowl competition in Billings this past March. According to an article in the Miles City Star it is the first time a CCDHS team has advanced to nationals since the late 1990s. That is pretty dang cool.
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Posted by Brian A. Reed (+6020) 3 years ago
Ms. Pett, your rebuttal to Mr. Moore's op-ed is brilliant and beautifully crafted. Thank you for taking the time to share your thoughts on this subject with us. I applaud your intelligence, empathy, and courage in speaking truth to ridiculousness.

My only concern is that, given the nature of those who are prone to fear and have chosen to be obtuse out of the relative ease and comfort of thought it offers, your letter might fall on deaf ears when it comes to the TLDR crowd, and that is truly a shame. What you said needs to be heard and taken to heart.

Mr. Moore, I have struggled in writing a suitable response to your op-ed, so I will err on the side of as much brevity as I can muster.

I will start by saying that one of my favorite sayings is, "Fearful people do stupid things." As I read your op-ed, the overwhelming impression that entered my mind was that it was written by person given to fear.

You're ostensibly an adult who has been chosen by your constituency to represent them in the state legislature. If what you choose to be the agent for is an ill-informed, cowardly and puerile base, then you must think terribly low of the citizens in your district and they should rightly feel insulted by your puerility and lack of understanding.

But if your chosen words do not reflect the feelings those of who you represent and you are speaking for yourself alone, you have made a complete ass of yourself. If you value your esteem in the eyes of your peers - and given the down-home, aww-shucks good-ol-boy persona you did your best to portray in your letter, I would say you do - you would do well to do better. Quite simply, you have presented yourself as a fool. I should think the people whose votes have put you in position to influence opinion and policy would want someone in your shoes to not be an embarrassment to them.

In short, do better. Do better as a state senator and as a human being, both, but especially as a human being.
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Posted by Brian A. Reed (+6020) 3 years ago
One other thing, Mr. Moore. If you think that the only reason a "boy would dress up as a girl" would be as an attempt to spy on girls, then I would question why your thoughts are so limited to such a scenario. The tactics that you might take as a peeping tom aren't things that ever enter the mind of the transgendered, and you should be ashamed of yourself.

Your attitude is damaging to all children of all genders. You have demonized boys by thinking so little of them that they must be predators. You have further marginalized the transgendered by refusing to accept anything but a binary view of the world. You have also insulted girls into thinking that they are in need of your very limited interpretation of protection.

Do better, sir.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+12887) 3 years ago
Reply to Brian A. Reed (#366712)
Brian A. Reed wrote:
.....

You're ostensibly an adult who has been chosen by your constituency to represent them in the state legislature. If what you choose to be the agent for is an ill-informed, cowardly and puerile base, then you must think terribly low of the citizens in your district and they should rightly feel insulted by your puerility and lack of understanding.

.....


Now, now. No need to bring us Trump supporters into this discussion.
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Posted by Brian A. Reed (+6020) 3 years ago
MISTER Pett. My apologies.

[Edited by Brian A. Reed (5/24/2016 5:28:54 PM)]
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Posted by Mary Catherine Dunphy (+2894) 3 years ago
Eric Moore writes that he is concerned about the safety and security of "our daughters."

Why is it that I cannot find any on-line written or published comments by Eric Moore displaying similar concern for the "safety and security of our daughters" when the University of Montana received national attention when it was singled out by the Justice Department and the Department of Education as one of the worst offenders of not investigating allegations of rape on campus?

It appears that Eric Moore is willing to write about his concerns about women's safety only when it involves transgender students, but not when it involves members of the UM football team or other heterosexual young, male, college students?

I can't help but wonder why we haven't heard more of Eric Moore's concern for women's safety until now?

Read more at:

http://www.huffingtonpost...47466.html
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Posted by Southbridge (+23) 3 years ago
It's definitely a hot issue, but I think there should have been more debate over it. Obama is to me, a large disappointment. He promised us transparency, but gave us trans gender bathrooms along with the least transparent presidency in history. He told us that Bush and his surveillance was infringing our rights and was illegal, then made it more legal, as well as ramping up the programs. He oversaw the ATF giving guns to cartels, which were used to shed American blood. Tells us that war is bad, and Bush is bad for causing it, but attacks Libya without congressional approval. After saying that he would end the raids on states where it is legal, he has allowed the DEA to double up and raid dispensaries (which included Montana businesses).

Also, to Amorette, you can tell men to stop raping women, we already do. Poopty people are poopty people. We need to be more serious about rape. From all sides, our law is weak. I don't know if Miles City does rape kits, but in bigger cities, they are encouraged to collect evidence. They are also forgotten and the evidence can go bad before testing. Many women will win a case because of her word vs his, even if he is innocent. Many men will get away with it because the social stigma is unreported. We will release a rapist back on to the streets over someone who smoked pot. There are men whose lives are ruined because that immoral 21 year old with a fake id thats been drinking at the bar for months is actually 15 (I don't think that happens here though, since someone is bound to know how young this person is). The poor and abused single mothers can't afford a lawyer, are often intimidated by the abuser, and don't even know their rights. Our schools need to teach that to our young men and women how to be safe, and more ways to prevent this tradgedy from happening.
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Posted by ZZZzz (-559) 3 years ago
amorette i would kinda like for you to walk a dark alley with bill clinton you would not get raped because. Even bill clinton has standards. An ex of mine had sex with bill clinton. I believe it carries the weight of rape. Bill clinton would not take no for an answer. No means no. SS ect were there at the beginning at least. And i bet you will still vote for rapin bill and hillary yeah you almost heard it here first.
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Posted by Brian A. Reed (+6020) 3 years ago
Thank you, Mary Catherine. The question you asked needs to be asked (and I am certainly more interested in Mr. Moore's answer than I am in reading about the status of his hair).

I messaged Mr. Moore on Facebook and invited him to read this thread. I hope he accepts the invitation and takes the opportunity to discuss matters further. I would encourage anyone interested to offer a similar invitation.

Here is his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/...5/?fref=ts. It is a public page and he has posted the following: "I am excited to establish this Facebook page as a way to be accessible to the many constituents across this vast Senate District," so I would think he would welcome public discourse.
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Posted by Brian A. Reed (+6020) 3 years ago
At the risk of feeding the troll ...

ZZZzz (if that is indeed your real name), would you do all the adults in the room the courtesy of either contributing something of substance to the discussion or kindly getting slagged and/or bent and/or lost?

It's your choice, but I am kind of hoping you go with the latter. In lieu of that, try not to be such a child.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6171) 3 years ago
Just to set the record straight, it was stated that transgender men have no interest in women. The transgender community comprises straight, lesbian, and gay sexual orientations just as the cisgender community does. One's sexual preference does not affect one's sexual identity. Two separate things.

Oh, and Eric Moore sucks rocks.

[Edited by Wendy Wilson (5/24/2016 8:29:12 PM)]
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+9464) 3 years ago
Ah, the classic reply to uppity women. I hope someone rapes you. That is called "rape culture" and is why women are brought up to fear men. Because men commit rape. No, not every single one of them but most women and little boys who are raped are raped by men and I can't tell if the man behind me in the street is a rapist or not because they do not wear signs.

As long as we treat rape as something that is okay for athletes to do and okay for drunk frat boys to do and assume women are liars about rape, then women are going to fear rapists and we have no way of telling who the rapists is.

Am I afraid of who is in the next stall? No.

Am I afraid of a random man? Yes.

ALL WOMEN ARE.
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Posted by Bob Netherton III (+2335) 3 years ago
Z wins, everyone! His ex had sex with Bill Clinton. Can't argue with that.


F@cking liar. I'm guessing Z frequently pulls doodoo like that out of his a$$ when he needs to be "convincing".
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Posted by ZZZzz (-559) 3 years ago
Well bob and amoerette seems rape is a crime unless rapin bill clinton does it bill clinton is a convicted felon. Spend some time in a bathroom with him amorette but no worries he still has standards. Only so much bill to go around
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr. (+13913) 3 years ago
All I can add to this discussion is "the B-I-B-L-E, oh that's the book for me" is NOT a biology book. We would do well to quit treating it as though it were. As Thomas Campbell once said: "We should speak where the Bible speaks and be silent where it is silent". 

David Crisp In Last Best News has written an excellent response to Sen. Moore. Not sure what else needs to be said:

Sorting out transgendered debate
One thing about state Rep. Eric Moore, R-Miles City: When he gets things wrong, he gets them wrong in a big way.

We all make mistakes, but rarely do we get as many things wrong in one place as Moore did in his guest opinion in the Billings Gazette on Tuesday. His first sentence, in which he describes the decrepitude of advancing age, is just about the last thing he gets right in a piece about transgendered rights in public schools.

Let’s start with his second sentence, which says that increasing age helps one see issues from other points of view. That may be true for some people on some issues, but when it comes to rights for gays, lesbians and the transgendered, young people are way ahead of us old fogies.

I had an openly transgendered student in one of my college classes, and it was pretty clear that the most uncomfortable person in the room was me. My students took it all in stride.

In his second paragraph, Moore says that President Obama issued an executive order that dictates “that if a boy wants in the girls’ locker room with our daughters, we as parents, trustees and teachers are powerless to stop it.”

This is wrong in at least two ways: There was no executive order; the notice came in the form of a “Dear Colleague” letter from the departments of Justice and Education. Second, the notice did not declare open season on girls’ locker rooms.

The letter does require that transgendered students be admitted to the locker room that fits their sexual identity, but it allows schools to set up facilities that respect the privacy of all students, not just transgendered ones. Most of the letter consists of examples of schools that have found effective and legal ways to deal with potential conflicts.

Moore then makes three points, all of them defective. First, he says that the guidance was imposed with “no debate, no legislation, no court case.” Not true. The guidelines proceed from requirements of Title IX, which was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Nixon in 1972.Title IX has been repeatedly challenged and amended in dozens of ways. But the new federal guidelines do not “add requirements to applicable law,” the “Dear Colleague” letter states.

Title IX reads, in full, “No person shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any educational program receiving Federal financial assistance.” Support for Title IX was part of the 1972 Republican Party platform, and it corrected what almost everybody now agrees were terrible injustices.

It’s true that Republicans who voted for Title IX probably had no idea that it would one day be used to protect rights of transgendered people, but words have consequences. When the founders said “all men are created equal,” they didn’t mean to include black men or women of any race.

But the logic of the language created an America in which equality eventually had to apply to everybody, or it would apply to nobody. If discrimination against the transgendered isn’t discrimination on the basis of sex, then sex discrimination does not exist.

Moore’s second point is that “top down, centralized decisions from D.C. (or Helena) are seldom good ones when it comes to education.” The meaning of “seldom” is open to debate, but it’s clear that decisions about fundamental civil rights cannot be entrusted to local schools.

We can’t have segregated schools in Mississippi, no matter how much Mississippians may want them. And we can’t have public universities that tell women they are not fit to study law or science, as some schools did before Title IX.

Moore’s third point, after some hemming and hawing, is, “What we don’t need is a federal mandate creating a special class of student that doesn’t have to follow basic rules of a civilized society.” But the federal guidelines don’t seek to create a special class; instead, they attempt to guarantee that no special classes are singled out for discrimination. Basic rules of civilized society must apply to all.

Last and worst, Moore proposes to draft legislation for the 2017 session “opposing this foolishness and protecting the safety and security of our daughters.” This is not only bad policy but bad economics. Recent North Carolina legislation requiring people to use public restrooms that match the sex on their birth certificate has cost the Charlotte, N.C., economy $285 million and 1,300 jobs so far, according to the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce.

Granted, these are sensitive matters. The Oklahoma Legislature has called for impeachment of Obama, the U.S. attorney general and the U.S. secretary of education over this issue. Legislators argue that students have a religious right to “separate but equal” restrooms and locker rooms.

But consider this: Scientific American reports that there may be biological differences in the brains of the transgendered. Research also shows that transgendered youths are four times more likely to attempt suicide than other young people.

“Trans people have brains that are different from males and females, a unique kind of brain,” says psychologist Antonio Guillamon.

Those who believe this is a religious issue probably also believe that God doesn’t make mistakes. If God created transgendered people whose brains don’t work like those of other people, then maybe God wasn’t testing the ability of the transgendered to overcome their biological inclinations. Maybe He was testing whether Christians really believe what Jesus said about doing unto others as you would have them do unto you.


http://lastbestnews.com/s...cPMse.dpuf
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Posted by Jeri Dalbec (+2805) 3 years ago
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Posted by Amorette F. Allison (+1911) 3 years ago
I'd reply to Z's latest screed but I couldn't figure out what he was mumbling about. My best guess Z is using the other classic rape culture insult: that I am too ugly to rape. I am so broken-hearted that you don't want to rape me. You have no idea.

So, not only is Z a lying sack of excrement, he is completely lacking in originality and has a lot of trouble with the English language.

Really. You sexist idiots have GOT to get some new material. I haven't heard an original insult from a sexist in decades. Maybe it's because their mindset is so regressive.

And Z's ignorance and insults have nothing to do with the subject at hand: treating people decently.

You know. Like the Golden Rule.

Remember that?

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Posted by Mary Catherine Dunphy (+2894) 3 years ago
Regarding rape culture, today's Washington Post (05/25/16) is reporting that white, high school football players in Idaho are charged with raping a black, disabled teammate with a coat hanger last fall. It appears no transgender students were involved in this incident -- it was the school's football players. Somebody, please tell Sen. Eric Moore.

https://www.washingtonpos...at-hanger/

As Amorette Allison so eloquently wrote earlier today: "As long as we treat rape as something that is okay for athletes to do and okay for drunk frat boys to do and assume women are liars about rape, then women are going to fear rapists and we have no way of telling who the rapists [sic] is."

The following is a quote from Jon Krakauer's book, Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town

"Using data gathered in 2011, the CDC study estimated that across all age groups, 19.3 percent of American women 'have been raped in their lifetimes' and that 1.6 percent of American women—nearly two and a half million individuals—'reported that they were raped in the 12 months preceding the survey.'"
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Posted by ZZZzz (-559) 3 years ago
Well you did reply amorette.seems you implied all males are rapists recently maybe a fantasy of yours dunno.if you want to see struggling with english just go pick up any copy of the miles city star.
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Posted by Kelly (+2568) 3 years ago
Can you say, "ad hominem?"
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Posted by Mary Catherine Dunphy (+2894) 3 years ago
Senator Eric Moore, FYI:

The Office of Victims of Crime at the U.S. Justice Department reports that "statistics documenting transgender people's experience of sexual violence indicate shockingly high levels of sexual abuse and assault. One in two transgender individuals are sexually abused or assaulted at some point in their lives.1 Some reports estimate that transgender survivors may experience rates of sexual assault up to 66 percent, often coupled with physical assaults or abuse.2 This indicates that the majority of transgender individuals are living with the aftermath of trauma and the fear of possible repeat victimization."

Read more at:

http://www.ovc.gov/pubs/f...mbers.html
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Posted by Amorette F. Allison (+1911) 3 years ago
Montana Cowgirl posted Morgan's letter. AND said he taught at "Miles City High School." Sigh. Dahlman's noted a correction but the Cowgirl hasn't noticed yet.
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Posted by Hannah Nash (+2501) 3 years ago
The public continues to respond to Senator Moore. From today's issue of the Miles City Star:

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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6171) 3 years ago
High school is hell.
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Posted by Mary Catherine Dunphy (+2894) 3 years ago
This is a really ironic news item today (06-02-16) given what has recently been discussed in recent posts about rape culture.

Ken Starr, who prosecuted President Bill Clinton for his affair with Monica Lewinsky, has resigned as Baylor University's chancellor. It was reported that "under Starr's leadership, Baylor did little to respond to accusation of sexual assault involving football players over several years.

Starr's stock at Baylor plummeted after the Pepper Hamilton law firm found a 'fundamental failure' by Baylor brass to look into rape allegations by football players and failed to heed federal statutes, including Title IX and the Violence Against Women Re-authorization Act of 2013.

Not only that, but Baylor under Starr's leadership actively discouraged some complainants from reporting or participating in student conduct processes and in one instance constituted retaliation against a complainant for reporting sexual assault.

Baylor also fired football coach Art Briles, suspended athletic director Ian McCaw, and canned several other administrators."

Read more at:

http://www.nbcnews.com/ne...sy-n584016

Interesting that Ken Starr was willing to investigate and prosecute the immoral, but not illegal, affair President Clinton had with Ms. Lewinsky; (two consenting adults); however, Ken Starr showed no similar zealotry in ensuring that Baylor investigate allegations of illegal sexual assaults by his school's football players.

What a world!
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+9464) 3 years ago
And Baylor is a good Baptist school.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr. (+13913) 3 years ago
Reply to Mary Catherine Dunphy (#366882)
Mary Catherine Dunphy wrote:
This is a really ironic news item today (06-02-16) given what has recently been discussed in recent posts about rape culture.

Ken Starr, who prosecuted President Bill Clinton for his affair with Monica Lewinsky, has resigned as Baylor University's chancellor. It was reported that "under Starr's leadership, Baylor did little to respond to accusation of sexual assault involving football players over several years.

Starr's stock at Baylor plummeted after the Pepper Hamilton law firm found a 'fundamental failure' by Baylor brass to look into rape allegations by football players and failed to heed federal statutes, including Title IX and the Violence Against Women Re-authorization Act of 2013.

Not only that, but Baylor under Starr's leadership actively discouraged some complainants from reporting or participating in student conduct processes and in one instance constituted retaliation against a complainant for reporting sexual assault.

Baylor also fired football coach Art Briles, suspended athletic director Ian McCaw, and canned several other administrators."

Read more at:

http://www.nbcnews.com/ne...sy-n584016

Interesting that Ken Starr was willing to investigate and prosecute the immoral, but not illegal, affair President Clinton had with Ms. Lewinsky; (two consenting adults); however, Ken Starr showed no similar zealotry in ensuring that Baylor investigate allegations of illegal sexual assaults by his school's football players.

What a world!


Since they were consenting adults, on what basis do you classify their relationship as "immoral"? I for one am tired of people shaming others for having consensual sex.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+12887) 3 years ago
Reply to Richard Bonine, Jr. (#366885)
Ummm....because President Clinton was and still is married? Call me old fashioned, but cheating on your spouse is immoral.

Future President Trump has the decency to divorce his wives before he marries the next one. That,my friends, is moral values in action.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr. (+13913) 3 years ago
Reply to Gunnar Emilsson (#366886)
Never mind. I'm gonna put down the keyboard and walk away.

[Edited by Richard Bonine, Jr. (6/2/2016 9:38:26 PM)]
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6171) 3 years ago
I typed out several responses but erased them all. I think I'll just go to the walrus cam.
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Posted by Mary Catherine Dunphy (+2894) 2 years ago
In case you missed it, here is Stan Taylor's letter to the editor which was published in the June 10, 2016 edition of the Miles City Star.


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Posted by Mary Catherine Dunphy (+2894) 2 years ago
Memo to Montana Senator Eric Moore:

Today, June 30, 2016, Secretary of Defense, Ash Carter, announced that effective immediately, transgender people will be able to serve openly in the U.S. military. I think if the U.S. military can accommodate transgender troops, we can accommodate transgender students in our schools in Montana. It's about giving transgender people of this country, and this state, their constitutional rights as citizens. This requires lawmakers, such as yourself, to develop non-discrimination policies. I suggest you listen to Secretary Carter's full speech which follows:

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Posted by Mary Catherine Dunphy (+2894) 2 years ago
Here's another memo for Senator Eric Moore.

Even the Billings Gazette agrees that "School Bathrooms Don't Belong in Court." Why? Because "in the past four decades, more Montanans and more Americans have come to understand that discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity is just as wrong as discrimination based on whether a person is male or female. [And,] public laws shouldn't encourage discrimination." (Billings Gazette, July 15, 2016)

Discrimination is against the law, Senator Moore. You are on the wrong side of both history and constitutional law if you pursue your stated goals in the next legislative session. Please consider changing your mind.

Read the Billings Gazette opinion at:

http://billingsgazette.co...e8f83.html
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