What are you reading?
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Posted by Stone (+1598) 14 years ago
I am reading "The Last of The Celts" by Marcus Tanner. It is great book in which the author goes on a quest to discover his Welch heritage. It is a stunning portrayal of modern Ireland and Scotland and Wales, in which it becomes painfully obvious that both the Irish and Scottish -Celtic/Gaelic traditions have been and are lost forever.

Along the way we learn some very interesting things concerning Scottish Americans and their false beliefs of the homeland.

Jack McRae- Good book give it a read.
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Posted by TK (+1624) 11 years ago
almost half way through Under the Dome by Stephen King--pretty good so far!
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6166) 11 years ago
In defense of my list, I stuck Austen on there because she's considered a master of her genre. On the other hand, in college I had to read Northhanger Abbey for a class and hated it so much I named my evil cat for one of the characters. Take that, Mr. Tilney!
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Posted by Bill Freese (+481) 11 years ago
Just read Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray. Been avoiding it for years. Enjoyed it much more than I had expected to. Now working on Lucius Apuleius' The Golden Ass.
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Posted by atomicg (+1012) 11 years ago
A while back i read "All The Shah's Men" about Kermit Roosevelt's assignment in Operation Ajax when the CIA and MI6 overthrew Mossadegh in Iran in 1953. It reads like a spy novel but is actually non fiction with a full bibliography. Fantastic story and gives an awesome background to the events all the way back to the Tobacco Revolution days.

I'm also half way through Anna Karenina which isn't as exciting but it is good.
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Posted by ike eichler (+1228) 11 years ago
Although my eyes are not what they once were, a couple of recent reads include-- Hell Gap A stratified Paleoindian campsite at the edge of the Rockies-- Larson, Kornfeld and Frison.

Crossing the Plains with Custer-- Horsted, Nelson and Grafe
This is the second book re the 1874 Black Hills Expedition-- Exploring with Custer being the first.
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Posted by JCF (+395) 11 years ago
I read Anna Karenina in college. Long, but good. at the time I read it, we were busy fighting in Bosnia and Serbia, and I remember thinking, as Anna's lover got deployed to fight in Serbia, how we seem to fight wars in the same places over, and over. That was in 1995-96. Here we are now, fighting wars over and over in Afghanistan and Iraq. The more things change, the more they stay the same.
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Posted by Stone (+1598) 11 years ago
Hal, I finally finished reading "On Sarpy Creek" by Ira Stephens Nelson and I am going to step out on a limb and say that this is the finest Montana fiction that I have ever read.

It has something for everyone love, hate, history, sex, death, murder and the most vivid discriptions of homesteading life I have ever read.

"On Sarpy Creek" by Ira Stephens Nelson-give it a read it is well worth the time.
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Posted by gypsykim (+1557) 11 years ago
I agree, Brady. One of the best Montana-themed books I have ever read. It's too bad we didn't get more from Nelson.
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Posted by Elizabeth Emilsson (+787) 11 years ago
Back to Wendy's list, for those of you who love Jane Austen, you might find these books by Jane Austin and Ben H. Winters quite hilarious. The first is "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies" and the second is "Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters".
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9960) 11 years ago
Thanks for the tip Brady - I've pretty much given up on ever reading everything on my list . . . it just keeps growing and growing. But with that strong of endorsement from you, I'll make a point of finding time for "On Sarpy Creek".

I took a break from non-fiction last month and blew through 7 books of Glen Cook's Dread Empire series. Good reading, but I think his Black Company series is better.

I'm currently plowing through this:

Donald Kagan. THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR (2003).

Kagan, like many of his contemporaries, sees the Peloponnesian War as tool to examine / understand the Cold War. He does a fine job of both telling the tale of that war and pointing out its similarities to the East-West contest of the second half of the twentieth century. I'm reading it with the current East-West conflict in mind to see if there are any parallels. But it's always easy to read too much into things. I've a friend who tells me that Peloponnesian War is an excellent tool for use in understanding the struggle between the free peoples of Middle Earth and the Dark Lord Saroun - and likely as not he's correct ; -)
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Posted by Mary McClarty (+82) 11 years ago
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl who played with Fire and just finished The Girl who kicked the Wasp's Nest.

Finished all and it is an amazing trilogy!! Sounds like there is a movie in the works, too!!
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6166) 11 years ago
Um, there have already been two movies I think. It is a good series. Too bad the author has passed away and there won't be any other works from him.
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Posted by Gm. Bonine (+87) 11 years ago
Curios George visits the Fire Station


also

'The Shack' by William P. Young

'Quiet Strength' by Tony Dungy

and
Church History in plain language by Bruce L. Shelley
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17479) 11 years ago
I am finally getting around to reading AB Guthrie JR's "The Big Sky"
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9960) 11 years ago
Let us know what you think of "The Big Sky" - I think it a most excellent read.
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Posted by Stone (+1598) 11 years ago
Hal, Kagan why do I know that name? I am sure that I have read him.
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Posted by Bob Netherton II (+1906) 11 years ago
If you're looking for a good Montana-based read, "Blind Your Ponies" by Stan West is a good. I just read "The Lost Continent" by Bill Bryson. Interesting and funny.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9960) 11 years ago
Brady,

Kagan has done a lot of good military / strategic-type histories. Not battlefield histories, but big picture analyses. He's been publishing for a good 20+ years. You've no doubt bumped into his stuff before.
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Posted by Stone (+1598) 11 years ago
Yes, I think I have a copy of- "On the Origins of War and the Preservation of Peace".
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9960) 11 years ago
Yup - that's likely why Kagan's name rang a bell with you.

I sometimes have to be careful not to confused Donald Kagan with John Keegan. Both deal with military history.

Keegan's works are usually more at the tactical battlefield level, but I still try to confuse them at times. This a good work by Keegan"
John Keegan, The Face of Battle (1976)
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Posted by Stone (+1598) 11 years ago
Now you got me wondering- I think I have a Churchill book by Keegan. All good stuff, thanks for all your insights Hal.
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Posted by Steve Sullivan (+1358) 11 years ago
Just started this. Shocking!




http://en.wikipedia.org/w...berg_Group
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Posted by Cheryl Gaer-Barlow (+476) 11 years ago
Hi! My husband LOVES good books on ole time Texas Rangers! Does anyone reading this have a recommendation for a good or great book about the Texas Rangers? Appreciate it!
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17479) 11 years ago
Cheryl:

Coincidentally, the former owner of Texas Rangers has an autobiography due to be released November 9, just in time for the holidays!

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Posted by Cheryl Gaer-Barlow (+476) 11 years ago
Love it!
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Posted by K.Duffy (+1812) 11 years ago
Has anyone here read "The Fall Of Giants" by Ken Follett? I really liked "Pillars of the Earth" and "World Without End", so I'm thinking this might be worth the $25.00 I know, I'm a cheapskate..
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6166) 11 years ago
My book club just finished Twain's The Innocents Abroad. Interesting and funny take on the ugly American abroad.
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Posted by Mandyrosy (+191) 11 years ago
More encouragement to read This House of Sky by Ivan Doig - undoubtedly the most beautiful Montana/Western book I have ever read. Another excellent one is Breaking Clean by Judy Blunt. If you love Montana/are from Montana/may someday move to Montana, these should almost be required reading.

Currently in the middle of A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn. I can't believe how many people have never read this iconic anti-history book. More required reading, if just in the interest of a balanced education.
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Posted by Sarah Peterson (+376) 11 years ago
Mandyrosy said: "More encouragement to read This House of Sky by Ivan Doig - undoubtedly the most beautiful Montana/Western book I have ever read. Another excellent one is Breaking Clean by Judy Blunt. If you love Montana/are from Montana/may someday move to Montana, these should almost be required reading."

Ditto Ditto Ditto. Another great Montana storyteller is Melanie Rae Thon--I'm rereading her collection of short stories "Girls in the Grass."

I'm also reading Gone with the Wind. Never got through it before, so I figured it was time. I may be the only person who doesn't particularly like the movie.
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Posted by M T Zook (+505) 11 years ago
I recently traveled to ND and saw a Louis L'Amour book in the store before I left, so I read "The Lonesome Gods" in honor of my trip to his home state and town. I have read a few of his other works, but this one was very good, couldn't get through it fast enough. There is always some loose history in his books too that keeps me interested.
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Posted by CS Hunt (+330) 11 years ago
Primer of Medical Radiobiology- Travis
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Posted by Dave Golterman (+244) 11 years ago
I have enjoyed Ivan Doig's books immensely too. One of my favorites is "Bucking The Sun" which has a plot line involving the construction of Fort Peck Dam. A friend from high school got mentioned by Doig for providing some background material on the communist movement in NE Montana at the time. That research was expanded into her own non-fiction book which I am reading at this time: Red Corner: The Rise and Fall of Communism in Northeastern Montana by Verlaine Stoner McDonald.

I'm also reading a book by Martin Kidston about the Montana National Guard's 163rd Infantry Regiment in World War II. The book is called "From Poplar to Papua"

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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6166) 11 years ago
Just finished The Man Who Loved Books Too Much by Allison Hoover Bartlett. It's about a man who defrauded antiquarian-book dealers of hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of rare books, one book at a time. It's also about Ken Sanders, the book dealer who made it his mission to catch him. Sanders has a fabulous store here in Salt Lake and also does bits on the Antique Roadshow. It's a fascinating story if you have a passion for books.
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Posted by Brian A. Reed (+6066) 11 years ago
Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes. It's probably the best war fiction I've ever read. Just finished Medium Raw by Anthony Bourdain, which was also outstanding. During my "alone time," I've been reading The Ruins by Scott Smith. It's not bad.
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Posted by gypsykim (+1557) 11 years ago
The Last Crossing by Guy Vanderhaeghe.
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Posted by sdrew (+230) 11 years ago
Rhino Ranch by Larry McMurty. "Sequel" to Texasville and Duane's Depressed. Small town slice of life stuff...kinda like this site!
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9960) 11 years ago
I ordered in a box of reading for the winter months. Two are shaping up to be good reads.

Melvyn Bragg, THE ADVENTURE OF ENGLISH: THE BIOGRAPHY OF A LANGUAGE (2003).

William Urban, BAYONETS FOR HIRE: MERCENARIES AT WAR, 1550-1789 (2007).

As much as folks here enjoy the English language I think many would find Bragg's work interesting. Urban's is a slow read, but it is providing a different perspective on the Wars of Religion, the rise of nation states, and the lead up to the Modern Era.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6166) 11 years ago
Ooohhhh, Hal. Let me know how you like the Bragg book. It sounds like it's right up my alley.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9960) 11 years ago
I'm about a hundred pages into it Wendy . . . I suspect you would enjoy it - you should find a copy. I got my from Edward R. Hamilton Bookseller's online site.

I bet you would also enjoy:

Robert McCrum, William Cran, Robert MacNeil, THE STORY OF ENGLISH (1986).
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9960) 11 years ago
Now here is a great read. Well researched and very well written.

Ever wondered how & why events that played out 2-3000 years ago are relevant today? Read this and you'll begin to understand why history is of some value.

Tom Holland. PERSIAN FIRE: THE FIRST WORLD EMPIRE AND THE BATTLE FOR THE WEST (2005).

Review:
http://www.guardian.co.uk...ianreview4
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Posted by K.Duffy (+1812) 11 years ago
Hal: Isn't that Edward Hamilton a great source? Only about $4.00 shipping, no matter how many books you buy, and I've always received my orders very quickly!

Overstock.com also has pretty good book deals from time to time. I finally broke down and ordered Ken Follett's Fall of the Giants from them. It's interesting so far, but I'm thinking it's going to have to get a lot more 'wintry' around here for me to finish it in less than 3 mths (I'm a slow, easily distracted reader..)
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9960) 11 years ago
Yup . . . I've bought books from Hamilton for 20-25 years. Love to thumb through the newsprint catalogs, though those seem to be on the way out.
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Posted by sdrew (+230) 11 years ago
The Green Mile by Stepehn King. Just had never gotten around to it after I saw the movie.
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Posted by Cheryl Pieters (+476) 11 years ago
I'm reading "The Kite Runner" by Khaled Hosseini. I read "A Thousand Splendid Suns" first and enjoyed it so much that I thought "The Kite Runner" would be really interesting too (and it is). At the Gym I am listening to "White Oleander" by Janet Fitch (an audiobook so I can lift weights without having to balance a book on my knee) and that is a pretty riveting book as well.

[This message has been edited by Cheryl Pieters (11/8/2010)]
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Posted by DaisySibyl (+16) 9 years ago
I am currently reading Moby Dick, as I've never read it. Pretty interesting so far, I have to say.

[link deleted - spam]
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Posted by Promise Plummer (+12) 7 years ago
Just started reading "Pride and Prejudice"
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Posted by Tom Masa (+2052) 7 years ago
Left For Dead..A Second Life After Viet Nam by John Hovde
and
You Can't Always Get What You Want by Sam Cutler
(roadie for the Rolling Stones and the Grateful Dead)
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Posted by heimer (+98) 7 years ago
The Floor of Heaven by Howard Blum.
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Posted by Barb Holcomb (+408) 7 years ago
Monsoon. Robert Kaplan

Thought provoking if you're interested in activities and future of the Indian Ocean, China, India and that part of the world.

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