What are you reading?
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 14 years ago
I am reading "The Last of The Celts" by Marcus Tanner. It is great book in which the author goes on a quest to discover his Welch heritage. It is a stunning portrayal of modern Ireland and Scotland and Wales, in which it becomes painfully obvious that both the Irish and Scottish -Celtic/Gaelic traditions have been and are lost forever.

Along the way we learn some very interesting things concerning Scottish Americans and their false beliefs of the homeland.

Jack McRae- Good book give it a read.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+14950) 14 years ago
"Along the way we learn some very interesting things concerning Scottish Americans and their false beliefs of the homeland."

Such as ... they don't REALLY eat haggis?
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 14 years ago
I jumped at Carlos' offer in the other thread to email a copy of his dissertation on Father Lindesmith - I just finished downloading it, so that's high on my list of priorities.

Carlos Eduardo Dávila. "The Mustard Seed in Montana: Father Eli W. J. Lindesmith and the Spirit of Order and Progress in the American West, 1880-1891" (2005).


In addition to the hot threads here, I'm working my way through a pile of things at the moment - even one work of fiction which is kind of rare for me. The nonfiction stuff includes:

Dumond, and Vanstone. PAUGVIK: A NINETEENTH CENTURY NATIVE VILLAGE ON BRISTOL BAY, ALASKA (1995)

Gwynne Dyer. WAR (1985)

Vladimir Dedijer, et al. HISTORY OF YUGOSLAVIA, Translator: Kordija Kveder (1974).

Fromkin. A PEACE TO END ALL PEACE: THE FALL OF THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE AND THE CREATION OF THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST (2001)


The novel is interesting - it's set in medieval Iceland, a grim and harsh land from the sounds of it.

Halldór Laxness. ICELAND'S BELL (1943 / 2003 translation)
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Posted by Jack McRae (+360) 14 years ago
Thanks Brady, I will give it a look.

I am reading "The Accidental President" a biography of John Tyler as part of my project to read a biography of each of the presidents in order. I am trying for one a month and in December i will be on Zachary Taylor and every book on him I can find the review says, " a very dry and boring book."
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 14 years ago
John Tyler. Not even one thing comes to mind except Tippecanoe and Tyler to.
That sounds like a noble effort, however. That era between Harrison and Lincoln must not be too exhilarating, or between Roosevelt and Roosevelt- Hoover, Coolidge and Taft. Wow, there is some stimulation. Good luck with your endeavor Jack.
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Posted by jessiker (+291) 14 years ago
I'm all about the Jimmy Buffet lately, so I'm reading "Tales from Margaritaville." It's humorous, but I don't like it as much as I did his books "Where is Joe Merchant?" and "A Salty Piece of Land".

Just a thought for all you readers:

I've found a place online that you may or may not be familiar with, called PaperbackSwap.com (which doesn't only have paperbacks). You list 10 books you're willing to get rid of by ISBN, and you get 2 credits to order books you would like. Then, for every book you send out, you get a credit to order another one you would like. You can create a wish list that will notify you when one you want comes available (some of them have waiting lists). It's located at (imagine this!) www.paperbackswap.com If you don't mind, you could list me as your referral (for which you get a free credit once the person has listed their books) as jessikerlaine ... but if you don't, it's all good, too! I just know that I'm quite the reader, and figured I would share.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11757) 14 years ago
I belong to Bookmooch and have swapped many books successfully! SInce I have some hardbacks in my collection, it works for me.
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 14 years ago
Thanks, everyone. Those are some great book tips.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+14950) 14 years ago
I am wondering if someone can direct me to a good book on the political-historical issues of Germany in the early 1500's. I have a theory and am looking for some facts about that time period.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 14 years ago
Richard,

If I was doing this, I'd grab Hughes or Strauss and see what I could find in their bibliographies to guide my research.

Michael Hughes. EARLY MODERN GERMANY, 1477-1806 (1992).

Gerald, Strauss, PRE-REFORMATION GERMANY (1972).
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+14950) 14 years ago
Thanks Hal! I looked both of those titles up on Amazon and they appear to be just what I was looking for. Now all I have to do is figure out how to take time off from work to read them.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 14 years ago
Making time to get things read is always tricky.

Here's the other thing I was trying to remember earlier this evening - I found the title in some old notes.

Heinz Schilling, RELIGION, POLITICAL CULTURE, AND THE EMERGENCE OF EARLY MODERN SOCIETY: ESSAYS IN GERMAN AND DUTCH HISTORY (1992).
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Posted by Kyle L. Varnell (+3745) 14 years ago
As of this moment I'm reading my reply to this thread.

Seriously though some of my favorite books are by the great father/son duo of Michael and Jeff Shaara. The father Michael Shaara's book The Killer Angels is a must read for anyone interested in the Civil War. His son Jeff's follow up books The Last Full Measure and Gods and Generals are also must reads. G&G is the "Prequel" to TKA and TLFM is the sequel to TKA.

TKA's was made into the movie Gettysburg starring Martin Sheen, Tom Berringer, Jeff Daniels, C. Thomas Howel among many others and G&G was also made into a movie however Gettysburg is the better of the two. Interesting side note in the movie Ted Turner has a very brief role as a Confederate General and is subsequently killed during Picket's Charge.

There is also a Pre-Prequel to all three by Jeff Shaara called Gone For Soldiers which chronicles the events of the Mexican/American War of which the combatants of the Civil War fought on the same side for the last time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/w...ler_angels

I would encourage anyone interested in American/Civil War History to check them out as they're all great reads.

[This message has been edited by Kyle L. Varnell (edited 10/30/2007).]
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Posted by Levi Forman (+3712) 14 years ago
Nobody reads fiction? Or you're just not posting it cause it doesn't make you sound intellectual?

Right now I'm reading "The Last Light of the Sun" by Guy Gavriel Kay. I read another of his earlier in the year named "Tigana" and based on those two I think he's the best fantasy writer in the business right now (not that that's saying much sometimes). I'm not a big fantasy fan, but those are excellent books.

I was halfway through "This House of Sky" by Ivan Doig and left it at my cousin's house . He is supposedly mailing it back to me but I'm starting to think I might just go buy a new copy when I finish my current book. The part I got through was fantastic though. It's nonfiction but it reads like a novel. Really beautiful book and a must read for people from Montana if you ask me, especially for rancher types.

Before those I read "Kitchen Confidential" by Anthony Bourdain, which chronicles his career working his way up from dishwasher to head chef of a fancy New York restaurant, mostly while drunk and high on heroin and cocaine. He has a mixture of smugness and self-loathing and enough crazy stories to make for a really funny book. I highly reccomend it although it's not for the easily offended.

The other notable book I've read recently is "Rabbit Run" by John Updike. Not easy reading and a horrible, depressing story, but man the guy can really write. Some stuff in it that was really excellent, but not exactly light summer reading.

[This message has been edited by Levi Forman (edited 10/31/2007).]
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 14 years ago
Biblio.com is a good place to hunt down books. I wish their search tool was a little better, but I can usually find what I'm looking for. And unless it's a very rare book, I often find a copy of what I'm after at a bargain price.
http://www.biblio.com/
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Posted by Dan (+463) 14 years ago
"The Red Badge of Courage", almost too descriptive / detailed at times...
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Posted by MCGirl (+298) 14 years ago
Ooh, "This House of Sky" is one of my absolute favorites all-time. I have been wanting to read Bourdain's book after watching his Travel Channel show; I'm a bit burned out (no pun intended) on drug books, having just finished "The Heroin Diaries" by Nikki Sixx--a deeply disturbing but interesting read of personal diaries kept during the blackness of herion addiction.

I am headed to the library to check out "Love in the Time of Cholera" which I am embarrassed to say I've never read (English degree be darned!) but I saw a preview for the movie, so it's time to jump in.
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Posted by Levi Forman (+3712) 14 years ago
Well, don't let me scare you with the drug stuff, it's really not a huge part of the book. He mentions taking drugs a lot, but there's no gritty rehab story or extended descriptions. It's really about the restaurant business and the drugs are just mentioned in passing.
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Posted by Matt Hom (+116) 14 years ago
FOUR STARS OF VALOR The Combat history of the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment in World War II... but hey being a paratooper thats about all I read about
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Posted by Carlos E. Davila (+45) 14 years ago
I recently re-read Tolstoy's "War and Peace" and really enjoyed it -- again. I'd forgotten those near-prose nirvana passages such as when Pierre observes the meteor, the Rostov's go holiday calling, and Petya Rostov meets his demise. Most importantly for me though was re-examining Tolstoy's analysis in reference to war and military success. There are some real pearls in the narrative. Continuing in the Russian literature vein, I read Mikhail Bulgakov's "The Master and Margarita" and Vladimir Nabokov's "Speak Memory." "The Master and Margarita" is a hilarious poke at the Soviet regime. One of the main characters is the devil. If you prefer non-fiction (autobiography) "Speak Memory" is a masterpiece. The autobiographical approach is original and Nabokov's life story is compelling. If you are fluent in Spanish, Jose Ruben Romero's "Obras Completas," (Complete Works) which includes his autobiography, is worth its weight in gold. Like Tolstoy, Romero's prose is elegant, but unlike Tolstoy, full of wit.

I really went on a reading bender recently and I was enjoying two or three books a week. These were a few that stood out when I thought about posting.

[This message has been edited by Carlos E. Davila (edited 11/2/2007).]
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 13 years ago
I just finished this - it's probably the best account I've yet read the 1918 influenza. While primarily focusing on the medical community's response to the epidemic, he also does a good job of examining the role of government and society at large during the disaster.

John M. Barry. THE GREAT INFLUENZA: THE EPIC STORY OF THE DEADLIEST PLAGUE IN HISTORY (Viking, 2004)

Here's some reviews if anyone is interested:
http://www.reviewsofbooks...influenza/
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Richard,

I just read a review of this and thought it might be of some interest to you- it seems to cover much of the same time period you asked about above.

Benjamin J. Kaplan. DIVIDED BY FAITH: RELIGIOUS CONFLICT AND THE PRACTICE OF TOLERATION IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE (Belknap Press,2007)
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+14950) 13 years ago
Thanks Hal!
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 13 years ago
'INFIDEL' by Ayaan Hirsi Ali

The book shines a new light on life in a Muslim country, as it humanizes Muslims. However, it does not sugar coat the life that woman must lead under Muslim rule. It is a quick read if anyone feels the need to actually learn why Muslims think the way they do.
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Posted by Frank Hardy (+1606) 13 years ago
Green Eggs and Ham- Dr. Seuss

Don't want to give too much away, but after denying this odd-colored breakfast staple with the company of a fox, and on a train, and many, many other odd situations, the plot takes a dramatic twist before coming to the shocking climactic ending. You will not put this page-turner down until you finish every word. But! A word of caution....don't turn ahead to the end. Take the surprise in stride. It's worth it.

Cheers!
FH

PS- I believe that this author has taken a pen name for this work and some others. Theodore Geisel has been credited as the real name of this author. Enjoy!
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Posted by don (+12) 13 years ago
A good book that is an easy read. Probably in one day it the Ultimate Gift by Stovall. It will make you think for about things a little differently.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 13 years ago
Stone, you are right on the money when it comes to Offit's biography on Maurice R. Hilleman.
http://www.milescity.com/...tid=4418#1

I just recently finished it and it is one good read.

Paul A. Offit. Vaccinated : One Man's Quest To Defeat The World's Deadliest Diseases (2007).

I cannot understand why the heck Hilleman was never awarded a Nobel Prize . . . I mean Holy Cows! The man literally saved tens of millions of lives through the vaccines he discovered - his research and vaccines are still saying lives at this very minute. It's more than probable I'd have never survived childhood if it weren't for Hilleman's work.

And I'm not alone in thinking the man was something extraordinary:

"If I had to name a person who has done more for the benefit of human health, with less recognition than anyone else, it would be Maurice Hilleman. Maurice should be recognized as the most successful vaccinologist in history."
--Dr. Robert Gallo, director of the Institute of Human Virology, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine; and co-discoverer of the AIDS virus

"Dr. Hilleman is one of the true giants of science, medicine and public health in the 20th century. One can say without hyperbole that Maurice has changed the world."
--Anthony Fauci, former director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

"Much of modern preventive medicine is based on Dr. Hilleman's work, though he never received the public recognition of Salk, Sabin or Pasteur. He is credited with having developed more human and animal vaccines than any other scientist, helping to extend human life expectancy and improving the economies of many countries."
--Lawrence K Altman, The New York Times

Anyway - if you want to read the life story of a Miles City boy who went out into the world and did some good . . . Offit's book is worth picking up.
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Moving on . . . .

Carlos Dávila - you are the Man!

I recently finished Carlos's PhD dissertation on Father Eli W. J. Lindesmith tenure as post chaplain at Fort Keogh.

Carlos Eduardo Dávila. "The Mustard Seed In Montana: Father Eli W. J. Lindesmith And The Spirit Of Order And Progress In The American West, 1880-1891" (2005).

I'm hoping that when the time is right Carlos will publish his manuscript - this is a work that needs to be on library shelves not just in Montana, but across the country.

Far from being a simple examination of Lindesmith's time in Montana, it is an examination of the American frontier and settlement experience that is of national relevance in understanding the development of this country in the 19th century. Carlos managed to use Lindesmith's time at Fort Keogh and in Milestown as the means to show how this one man's experiences mirrored the cultural forces that shaped the development of the American West. And while that is no small feat in its own right, he did so with rock solid scholarship, and as importantly his work is written in an engaging and accessible style.
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Finally . . . I'm nearly finished with 1491 . . . one of the more thought provoking works I've read in years.

Charles C. Mann. 1491: New Revelations Of The Americas Before Columbus (2006).

It is a summary of recent scholarship, discoveries, and theories on the status of Native American culture and civilization prior to the arrival of Europeans. I thought I had been keeping fairly current on the topic - in layman's terms anyway. But jeez . . . have I fallen behind.

I am just astounded at how much has been learned in recent years . . . and I am even more astounded at what they are discovering about the complexity and richness of Native culture and civilization prior to the arrival of Europeans. Even if some of the current theories prove to be somewhat exaggerated (as new theories often are) - it is staggering how much we've underestimated and underappreciated pre-Columbian Native Americans.

If you can approach Mann's summary of what's new and exciting in the field of pre-Columbian studies with an open and inquiring mind - then you'll likely find this to be a great read. If you aren't comfortable with exploring new ideas - then I'd say give it a pass.

Two older works that would excellent companion pieces to 1491 would be:

William Cronon. Changes In The Land: Indians, Colonists, And The Ecology Of New England (1983).

Stephen J. Pyne. Fire In America: A Cultural History Of Wildland And Rural Fire (1997).

Cronon and Pyne both touch on some of the topics explored by Mann, both challenge us to rethink what we are sure we know and both provide the opportunity to stretch the mind by thinking in new directions.
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Posted by Heath H (+641) 13 years ago
Ken Follett's
The Pillars of the Earth
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 13 years ago
Hal, I would love to see Mr. Davila's work I hope he gets it published- sounds interesting.

About Offits book. I asked Mrs. Hilleman about the book. Expressing that I wished it would have been a biography. She stated that it started out as a biography but because of his illness and death it turned into an overfew of vacinology. Still a great little read for anyone.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 13 years ago
Brady, I asked Carlos and he was kind enough to send me a pdf copy of his dissertation. Could be he'd do the same for you ;-) see:
http://www.milescity.com/...tid=4050#8

[This message has been edited by Hal Neumann (edited 2/28/2008).]
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 13 years ago
Here's a good read.

Robert D Kaplan, BALKAN GHOSTS: A JOURNEY THROUGH HISTORY (2005).
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 13 years ago
On lighter side.

"Nothing's Sacred"

By Lewis Black the comedian.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11757) 13 years ago
I have a copy of Carlos' dissertation at the office! It has been published in BOOK FORM. Tiny little type but I'm enjoying it.

Just finished "The United State of Arugala" for the foodies. Hilarious and fascinating. The intro is annoying but it gets better. I started reading it on my 50th birthday--the liquid diet day--and still loved it.
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Posted by ABC (+381) 13 years ago
The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins. Great reading if you are an atheist.

ABC
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+14950) 13 years ago
ACRONYMS for dummies.
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Posted by Bob Netherton (+1893) 13 years ago
milescity.com
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Posted by Buck Showalter (+4461) 13 years ago
Nice one Richard... GBLT.
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Posted by K.Duffy (+1807) 13 years ago
ABC, Have you watched Richard Dawkins' speech on militant atheists? It's interesting. Here's the link..

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/113
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Posted by Brian (+360) 13 years ago
Huxley's "Brave New World", Salvatore's "Sojourn", Lewis Black's "Nothing Sacred" and, when I need a break, Steven Colbert's "I Am America (and So Can You.)" ADHD...it's fantastic!
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Posted by Heath H (+641) 13 years ago
I just finished Dana Lamb's chronicle of his (with wife Ginger) adventure in a 16 foot homebuilt canvas covered hybrid sailboat from San Diego, California to and through the Panama canal in the early 1930's. They left San Diego with less than $5 and took 3 years to discover the Pacific coast of Mexico, Costa Rica, Cocos Island, and other desinations while meandering southward. The two of them lived off the land and were constantly foraging for food and water. They found both friendly and hostile Indians while fighting bad weather, pests, parasites, and malaria. It's an incredible story.

Enchanted Vagabonds
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 13 years ago
I just finished this - it's a challenging, but interesting read. I have a hunch I'll be mulling it over for sometime, trying to see if I can fit pieces of it into what I believe and think I know.

John Rawls, A THEORY OF JUSTICE (1971).

Here's a bio piece on Rawls:
Martha Nussbaum, "The Enduring Significance of John Rawls," THE CHRONICLE REVIEW, July 20, 2001.
http://chronicle.com/free...b00701.htm


Here're a couple items on the above mentioned book:
Rawls' Mature Theory of Social Justice: An Introduction for Students
http://www.wku.edu/~jan.g....htm#2prin

A Theory of Justice
http://oak.cats.ohiou.edu...rawls.html
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 12 years ago
"Elsie Fox Portrait Of An Activist" Karen Stevenson with Elsie Fox-

This book should be required reading for activism, unionism and women's suffrage. The historical scope of this book is beyond imagination. A movie should be made of Elsie's life.

Karen, you did a fine job of putting Elsie's words to paper and creating a nice side story to boot. You both should be very proud.
Elsie your life is as rich as any one human could ever want. I wish you both all the best you have inspired me.
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Posted by Bob Netherton (+1893) 12 years ago
"I Am America and So Can You" by Stephen Colbert.
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Posted by Brandy Leischner (+166) 12 years ago
hmmm.

The Carpet Makers by Andreas Eschbach (translated from German)
Very interesting fiction/fantasy/sci-fi that will keep you up in the air until the very end.

Pastwatch: The Redemption of Christopher Columbus by Orson Scott Card
It is alternative history story that puts Christopher Columbus in a better light.

Radical Brewing by Randy Mosher
A histery on Brewing and new methods explained.

Oh yeah, many books and short stories by Patrick McManus. They are very entertaining. Aaron
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11757) 12 years ago
"In the Shadow of Wounded Knee" by Roger di Silvestro. A MUST read for those interested in local history. Yes, Nelson A. could be one huge pain in the patoot but he was usually right.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6165) 12 years ago
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie. It's for my book club. We got tired of chick flick Oprah picks.
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Posted by Brian A. Reed (+6014) 12 years ago
I am rereading the entire ElfQuest saga from beginning to end. For anyone who is into sci-fi/fantasy, graphic novels, original stories and absolutely beautiful artwork, I strongly recommend you give it a try.
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Posted by Crash (+122) 12 years ago
Leaving the Saints: How I Lost the Mormons and Found My Faith. Written by Martha Beck. A great read about a woman's search for her spirituality. Interesting stories revealed about the history of the LDS church.
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Posted by Sarah Peterson (+374) 12 years ago
Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. It's about their family's decision to eat only local or what they have produced in their garden for an entire year. There's also some commentary about the commercialization of agriculture and some fantastic recipes.
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Posted by gypsykim (+1556) 12 years ago
Sarah, I loved "Animal, Vegetable, Mineral".

I'm almost done with "The Story of Edgar Sawtelle" by David Wroblewski. In the middle of "The Appeal" by John Grisham and getting ready to start "The Greates Thing Since Sliced Bread" by Don Robertson.
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 12 years ago
I could not find the latest "what are you reading post so I found an old one-

The Search for General Miles- by Newton F. Tolman
It is some what elementary but it is an easy read and seems to give one a good overview of Miles and his life. It is available at the Miles City Public library.
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Posted by Kacey (+3159) 12 years ago
I am loving Angels and Demons. Was going to just see the movie. I'm glad I didn't.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6165) 12 years ago
Just finished Replay by Ken Grimwood. My club had a great discussion about it despite it being a sci fi book of sorts and there are all women in my group. Involves involuntary time travel and philosophical questions.

Next on the list is the Yiddish Policemen's Society.
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Posted by Kass Portra (+42) 12 years ago
"It's Your Ship"
Michael Abrashoff

It's a management/leadership book, probably the most readable of any I've found so far.
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Posted by TK (+1623) 12 years ago
"Whispers" by Dean Koontz--I'm almost 3/4 done with it; then on to "Watchers" by Dean Koontz (I'm a HUGE fan), then probably onto Angels and Demons by Dan Brown--I read The DaVinci Code before seeing the movie, and I happen to like both the movie and book, although they are a bit different from each other, but then what movie is EXACTLY like the book????? Hope Angels and Demons is all it's cracked up to be! (will probably get to it in the next week or two!)
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 12 years ago
"Stephan Hawking A Biography" by Kristine Larsen. Wow is all I have to say. He is a remarkable man not only for his physics and his disability but for his shear fortitude.

and because I vowed to my reading friends that for every couple of academic type books that I read I would attempt to read a book of fiction for entertainment sake- I have started "The Eleventh Man" by my new favorite author Ivan Doig. Thank you Hal for introducing him to me.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 12 years ago
I'm about halfway through this:

Hugh Pope. SONS OF THE CONQUERORS: THE RISE OF THE TURKIC WORLD (2005).

It's pretty interesting. It's a survey of post-Cold War Turkic Peoples and Turkish nation states.
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I picked this up in part because I thought it would be interesting and in part because I wondered what a cultural history was.
Andrew Beattie. THE ALPS: A CULTURAL HISTORY (2006)

It pretty much sucks. Apparently a cultural history consists of poorly written, badly researched, highly inaccurate history.
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This is good.

Bill Carter. RED SUMMER: THE DANGER, MADNESS, AND EXALTATION OF SALMON FISHING IN A REMOTE ALASKAN VILLAGE (2008).

It's about commercial fishing for Reds (sockeye salmon) at Egegik, a small village south of here. If you've ever thought about fishing for the summer, this should cure of the notion ; -)
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Posted by Dave Golterman (+243) 12 years ago
Actually I read this earlier this summer, but decided to share the recommendation:

Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen

Excellent book about a young man who joins the circus during the Great Depression. It flashes back to the 30's from his current life in a nursing home. Very powerful book.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6165) 12 years ago
Water for Elephants is a very good book. My book club will be discussing Reading Lolita in Tehran next week. Fascinating insight into Iran during the Revolution in the 1980s.
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Posted by Andie13 (+46) 12 years ago
I am reading "Doctors From Hell," by Viven Spitz -- an account of the Nazi experiments on humans. It is written by what was then, a 22-year-old US court reporter recruited by the US War Deparement to record the Nuremburg trials in Germany. It includes transcripts and pictures *yike* that have not been readily available to the public. It's not for the faint of heart, but well worth it if you're interested in WWII history.
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Posted by TK (+1623) 12 years ago
Dean Koontz's Frankenstein series, Book 3: Dead and Alive. My hubby got me the 2nd book for Christmas a couple years ago, so I had to go buy the first one before I could read the second one; by the time I was done with the first one, I was completely "involved" in the books--didn't think I would be!!!!
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Posted by T Brown (+478) 12 years ago
Milescity.com
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Posted by Patrick Petroff (+69) 12 years ago
Just finished the Joe Dimaggio biography by Richard Ben Kramer, as much as I despise those Yankees you can't turn your back on their rich history and baseball itself.

I'm now going back and revisiting Marc Reisner's "Cadillac Desert". It's a thoroughly researched brilliant piece of work written by an author who passed away prematurely. My history professor at MSU had our class watch the PBS special titled the same.
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Posted by Bridgier (+9193) 12 years ago
Cadillac Desert should be required reading for anybody that lives west of the 100th meridian, particularly anybody that subscribes to the "rugged individualist" ethos. If the federal government hadn't been willing to expend vast amounts of money to create a environment that required a minimal amount of adaption by eastern farmers, the west would look far different today.
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Posted by Lorin Dixson (+596) 12 years ago
I am wondering How many of you have read THE UY RANCH Helen Addison Howard, and your opinion of it. My grand father Sol Nichols was Smoky's brother. They were partners on the ranch on Sunday creek untill sometime after Carrie came into the picture. As I remember stories from my youth no one in my family were fans of Carrie. I actually don't remember hearing her name until I read the book, she was known by less flatering names. My mother was cousins with Smokey's children and was lifelong friends with Dutch's wife Esther. and Nora. The only one of Smoky's children I personaly knew was Nora Aunt Jimmy to me.
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Posted by Heath H (+641) 12 years ago
Jared Diamond

Guns, Germs, and Steel
and
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Posted by Bridgier (+9193) 12 years ago
Here's what I got from those two books:

Humanity is going to eat and screw their way into oblivion, because culture cannot change fast enough to adapt to changes in the environment.

A bleak outlook, but good books nonetheless.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17321) 12 years ago
Just got back from 16 days in Italy, so of course I needed books to read on the plane.

I finished reading "An Omnivore's Dilemma" by Michael Pollen, which was okay....not as good as "Botany of Desire" though.

I also read "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies"....kind of stupid, but funny. It does make Jane Austin readable, though.

In the midst of reading "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" by Stieg Larsson....now this is an excellent mystery.
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Posted by LG (+195) 12 years ago
Just finished 'The Work of Wolves' by Kent Meyers. Fantastic fiction based in South Dakota near the Badlands. Beautifully descriptive and dynamic story. Reminds me just a little of Steinbeck.
Meyers is a professor at BHSU in Spearfish.
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 11 years ago
A few months ago I read Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian. The Modern Library Editorial Board voted this book as a new American Classic.Some of the authors on the board include Maya Angelou, Shelby Foote, Charles Johnson and my favorite Caleb Carr.

I also read "The Greatest Show on Earth" by Richard Dawkins Author of "The God Delusion".

I am currently reading "On Sarpy Creek" by Ira Stephens Nelson.

and Jack Kerouac's short stories- On the Road, The Good Blonde and others.
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Posted by Denise Selk (+1670) 11 years ago
In the middle of a few right now, depending on the mood. Re-reading Wuthering Heights. Working on Giants in the Earth. Also Misquoting Jesus, with the Women of Faith Study Bible for comparison and reference.

Happy reading Stone!
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Posted by MilesCity.com Webmaster (+10001) 11 years ago
The last book I read was "American on Purpose" by Craig Ferguson. I thought it was pretty interesting. It's an autobiography, so it definitely tells you about his life -- and he's brutally honest.
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Posted by Mary1 (+158) 11 years ago
The Tie That Binds by Kent Haruf but I'm not far enough into it to say how good it is yet. Next on the list Julie and Julia.
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Posted by Mary McClarty (+80) 11 years ago
THe Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle
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Posted by Lorin Dixson (+596) 11 years ago
I bought an ereader. I would like recommendations for books published before 1923 as you can download them for free on google books,Gutenberg and other sites as well. I will be going to sea for the summer probably in May and would like to be stocked up with reading material by then. It is hard to just browse for books on the sites. Our local library is going to have ebooks to check out sometime this spring or summer. They now have a good selection of audio books I tried a couple of them but for some reason I wasn't able to enjoy them that much. I am not sure why it just doesn't work for me. I haven't bought any books for it yet because while they are cost little less than a book, when you have read them you can't give them away or trade them like you can printed books. I am sure that will change when they start putting them in book stores on a CD or some kind of media. For now the only place I know to buy them is by downloading them on the net. Anyway I would appreciate any good suggestions on pre 1923 books.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6165) 11 years ago
I'd try some of the classics. I think these are all pre-1923.

Louisa May Alcott (Little Women)
Jane Austen (Emma) or whatever
Charlotte Bronte (Jane Eyre)
Emily Bronte (Wuthering Heights)
Lewis Carroll (Through the Looking Glass)or whatever
Willa Cather (My Antonia)
James Fenimore Cooper (The Last of the Mohicans)
Daniel Defoe (Robinson Crusoe)
Charles Dickens (Great Expectations, Tale of Two Cities)
Frederick Douglass (My Bondage and My Freedom, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave)
Arthur Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes)
Alexandre Dumas (The Count of Monte Cristo, The Three Musketeers)
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter)
Homer (The Odyssey)
Henry James (The Turn of the Screw)
Rudyard Kipling (Captains Courageous, The Jungle Book)
Jack London (The Call of the Wild, White Fang)
Sir Walter Scott (Ivanhoe)
William Shakespeare Anything
George Bernard Shaw (Pygmalion)
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein)
Upton Sinclair (The Jungle)
Robert Louis Stevenson (Kidnapped, Treasure Island)
Bram Stoker (Dracula)
Jonathan Swift (Gulliver's Travels)
Leo Tolstoy (War and Peace)
Mark Twain (The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn)
Jules Verne (Around the World in Eighty Days, Journey to the Center of the Earth, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea)
H.G. Wells (The Invisable Man, The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds)
Edith Wharton (The Age of Innocence)
Oscar Wilde (The Picture of Dorian Gray)
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17321) 11 years ago
Wendy's got a good list. I have liked everything by Mark Twain.

"Main Street" by Upton Sinclair.

For mindless potboilers, when I was a kid I liked Edgar Rice Burroughs.

Just say "NO!" to Jane Austin.
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Posted by Lorin Dixson (+596) 11 years ago
Thank you Wendy; I have downloaded a big part of those already. But there were some I didn't think of. Keep posting any you think of especialy any lesser known good reads. I just re-read the jungle

[This message has been edited by Lorin Dixson (3/21/2010)]
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Posted by Kender Beeler (+66) 11 years ago
I just got done reading The Dresden Files books, much better the the tv shows. Does anyone have any suggestions on something of the sort? also a friend told me of a book about a serial killer that hides in an apartment building. He first placed a music box in an apartment and if a woman touched, or opened it would kill them. it's fictional, does anyone know the title, or something kinda like it??? please and thank you.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 11 years ago
BLOOD MERIDIAN is one heck of a read.

McCarthy is no Larry McMurtry, is he Brady? : -) : -)


I'm about halfway through this:
Jeff Goodell, BIG COAL (2006).

It is a darned interesting read. Raises many questions for which no one seems to have answers.

A lot of it covers Richard's home ground in Wyoming.
= = = = = = = = =


"Just the omission of Jane Austen's books alone would make a fairly good library out of a library that hadn't a book in it."
--Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

[This message has been edited by Hal Neumann (3/21/2010)]
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Posted by Lorin Dixson (+596) 11 years ago
Maybe Hal, Amorette or anyone, how about some published pre 1923 history reads?
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 11 years ago
What area / field of history Lorin?
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Posted by Bob Netherton II (+1905) 11 years ago
I just read "All the Pretty Horses" by McCarthy. Great book. I can't imagine it translated all that well into film. I plan on reading the rest of the "Border Trilogy" eventually. Cormac McCarthy has an interesting style, that's for sure.
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Posted by Lorin Dixson (+596) 11 years ago
Hal; mainly American history, especially the western states.
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 11 years ago
"McCarthy is no Larry McMurtry, is he Brady? : -) : -)"

Hal, you make me laugh. You are correct he is no McMurtry. The name of the book should be violence. It was Nonstop from beginning to end. In the middle of the book I got lost and had to read some of it over. I do not know if it was a difficult read or if I am to intellectually immature for Cormack. Or it could be the two little girls vying for my attention. Nonetheless, the book was riveting.

If you liked that book you may like "The Alienist" by Caleb Carr- full of violence in a cool historic setting.
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Posted by Steve Craddock (+2743) 11 years ago
Blue Horizons by Tony Horwitz, who retraces Captain Cook's explorations into the Southern Hemisphere. The author is a great storyteller and his Australian sidekick adds the right amount of humor to make it a great read. Just don't ever ask me to get on a sail boat and travel the Seven Seas -- or even just one!
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Posted by JCF (+393) 11 years ago
about a 1/3 of the way through "Three Cups of Tea"

its interesting.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 11 years ago
Jeez Lorin, that's a tough one.

Here are 5 for Montana - some of the publication dates fall outside your criteria, but the material covered in them was written/experienced/lived prior to the 1920s.

Abbott, EC, 1860-1939, and Helena Huntington Smith. WE POINTED THEM NORTH; RECOLLECTIONS OF A COWPUNCHER (1939, reprint: Chicago: Lakeside Press, 1991).

Alderson, Nannie Tiffany, b. 1860, and Helena Huntington Smith. A BRIDE GOES WEST (c1942, reprint: Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1974).

Garcia, Andrew, d. 1943. TOUGH TRIP THROUGH PARADISE, 1878-1879, edited by Bennett H. Stein (reprint, 1967: Moscow, ID: University of Idaho Press, 2001).

Grinnell, George Bird. THE CHEYENNE INDIANS, THEIR HISTORY AND WAYS OF LIFE, 2 vols (1923; reprint: University of Nebraska Press 1972).

Stuart, Granville, 1834-1918. FORTY YEARS ON THE FRONTIER AS SEEN IN THE JOURNALS AND REMINISCENCES OF GRANVILLE STUART, GOLD-MINER, TRADER, MERCHANT, RANCHER AND POLITICIAN, edited by Paul C. Phillips (reprint 1925: University of Nebraska Press, 2004)


A great resource is the University of Nebraska's Bison Press - they specialize in issuing affordable editions of rare and out-of-print works on Western American History.
http://www.nebraskapress....px?cid=152

The University of Oklahoma has a similar imprint the specializes in getting older Western History works back into publication.
http://www.oupress.com/
= = = = = =


Brady, I read the Alienist sometime back - it is a good piece of fiction. It was interesting to see how Carr wove historical characters and events into his fiction. I've never quite thought of Teddy Roosevelt in the same way since reading the book.

And Yeah . . . . BLOOD Meridian is a fitting title for McCarthy's book ; -)
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Posted by TK (+1623) 11 years ago
almost half way through Under the Dome by Stephen King--pretty good so far!
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6165) 11 years ago
In defense of my list, I stuck Austen on there because she's considered a master of her genre. On the other hand, in college I had to read Northhanger Abbey for a class and hated it so much I named my evil cat for one of the characters. Take that, Mr. Tilney!
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Posted by Bill Freese (+479) 11 years ago
Just read Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray. Been avoiding it for years. Enjoyed it much more than I had expected to. Now working on Lucius Apuleius' The Golden Ass.
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Posted by atomicg (+1010) 11 years ago
A while back i read "All The Shah's Men" about Kermit Roosevelt's assignment in Operation Ajax when the CIA and MI6 overthrew Mossadegh in Iran in 1953. It reads like a spy novel but is actually non fiction with a full bibliography. Fantastic story and gives an awesome background to the events all the way back to the Tobacco Revolution days.

I'm also half way through Anna Karenina which isn't as exciting but it is good.
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Posted by ike eichler (+1226) 11 years ago
Although my eyes are not what they once were, a couple of recent reads include-- Hell Gap A stratified Paleoindian campsite at the edge of the Rockies-- Larson, Kornfeld and Frison.

Crossing the Plains with Custer-- Horsted, Nelson and Grafe
This is the second book re the 1874 Black Hills Expedition-- Exploring with Custer being the first.
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Posted by JCF (+393) 11 years ago
I read Anna Karenina in college. Long, but good. at the time I read it, we were busy fighting in Bosnia and Serbia, and I remember thinking, as Anna's lover got deployed to fight in Serbia, how we seem to fight wars in the same places over, and over. That was in 1995-96. Here we are now, fighting wars over and over in Afghanistan and Iraq. The more things change, the more they stay the same.
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 11 years ago
Hal, I finally finished reading "On Sarpy Creek" by Ira Stephens Nelson and I am going to step out on a limb and say that this is the finest Montana fiction that I have ever read.

It has something for everyone love, hate, history, sex, death, murder and the most vivid discriptions of homesteading life I have ever read.

"On Sarpy Creek" by Ira Stephens Nelson-give it a read it is well worth the time.
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Posted by gypsykim (+1556) 11 years ago
I agree, Brady. One of the best Montana-themed books I have ever read. It's too bad we didn't get more from Nelson.
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Posted by Elizabeth Emilsson (+797) 11 years ago
Back to Wendy's list, for those of you who love Jane Austen, you might find these books by Jane Austin and Ben H. Winters quite hilarious. The first is "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies" and the second is "Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters".
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 11 years ago
Thanks for the tip Brady - I've pretty much given up on ever reading everything on my list . . . it just keeps growing and growing. But with that strong of endorsement from you, I'll make a point of finding time for "On Sarpy Creek".

I took a break from non-fiction last month and blew through 7 books of Glen Cook's Dread Empire series. Good reading, but I think his Black Company series is better.

I'm currently plowing through this:

Donald Kagan. THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR (2003).

Kagan, like many of his contemporaries, sees the Peloponnesian War as tool to examine / understand the Cold War. He does a fine job of both telling the tale of that war and pointing out its similarities to the East-West contest of the second half of the twentieth century. I'm reading it with the current East-West conflict in mind to see if there are any parallels. But it's always easy to read too much into things. I've a friend who tells me that Peloponnesian War is an excellent tool for use in understanding the struggle between the free peoples of Middle Earth and the Dark Lord Saroun - and likely as not he's correct ; -)
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Posted by Mary McClarty (+80) 11 years ago
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl who played with Fire and just finished The Girl who kicked the Wasp's Nest.

Finished all and it is an amazing trilogy!! Sounds like there is a movie in the works, too!!
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6165) 11 years ago
Um, there have already been two movies I think. It is a good series. Too bad the author has passed away and there won't be any other works from him.
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Posted by Gm. Bonine (+85) 11 years ago
Curios George visits the Fire Station


also

'The Shack' by William P. Young

'Quiet Strength' by Tony Dungy

and
Church History in plain language by Bruce L. Shelley
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17321) 11 years ago
I am finally getting around to reading AB Guthrie JR's "The Big Sky"
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 11 years ago
Let us know what you think of "The Big Sky" - I think it a most excellent read.
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 11 years ago
Hal, Kagan why do I know that name? I am sure that I have read him.
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Posted by Bob Netherton II (+1905) 11 years ago
If you're looking for a good Montana-based read, "Blind Your Ponies" by Stan West is a good. I just read "The Lost Continent" by Bill Bryson. Interesting and funny.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 11 years ago
Brady,

Kagan has done a lot of good military / strategic-type histories. Not battlefield histories, but big picture analyses. He's been publishing for a good 20+ years. You've no doubt bumped into his stuff before.
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 11 years ago
Yes, I think I have a copy of- "On the Origins of War and the Preservation of Peace".
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 11 years ago
Yup - that's likely why Kagan's name rang a bell with you.

I sometimes have to be careful not to confused Donald Kagan with John Keegan. Both deal with military history.

Keegan's works are usually more at the tactical battlefield level, but I still try to confuse them at times. This a good work by Keegan"
John Keegan, The Face of Battle (1976)
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Posted by Stone (+1596) 11 years ago
Now you got me wondering- I think I have a Churchill book by Keegan. All good stuff, thanks for all your insights Hal.
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Posted by Steve Sullivan (+1333) 11 years ago
Just started this. Shocking!




http://en.wikipedia.org/w...berg_Group
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Posted by Cheryl Gaer-Barlow (+474) 11 years ago
Hi! My husband LOVES good books on ole time Texas Rangers! Does anyone reading this have a recommendation for a good or great book about the Texas Rangers? Appreciate it!
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17321) 11 years ago
Cheryl:

Coincidentally, the former owner of Texas Rangers has an autobiography due to be released November 9, just in time for the holidays!

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Posted by Cheryl Gaer-Barlow (+474) 11 years ago
Love it!
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Posted by K.Duffy (+1807) 11 years ago
Has anyone here read "The Fall Of Giants" by Ken Follett? I really liked "Pillars of the Earth" and "World Without End", so I'm thinking this might be worth the $25.00 I know, I'm a cheapskate..
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6165) 11 years ago
My book club just finished Twain's The Innocents Abroad. Interesting and funny take on the ugly American abroad.
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Posted by Mandyrosy (+189) 11 years ago
More encouragement to read This House of Sky by Ivan Doig - undoubtedly the most beautiful Montana/Western book I have ever read. Another excellent one is Breaking Clean by Judy Blunt. If you love Montana/are from Montana/may someday move to Montana, these should almost be required reading.

Currently in the middle of A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn. I can't believe how many people have never read this iconic anti-history book. More required reading, if just in the interest of a balanced education.
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Posted by Sarah Peterson (+374) 11 years ago
Mandyrosy said: "More encouragement to read This House of Sky by Ivan Doig - undoubtedly the most beautiful Montana/Western book I have ever read. Another excellent one is Breaking Clean by Judy Blunt. If you love Montana/are from Montana/may someday move to Montana, these should almost be required reading."

Ditto Ditto Ditto. Another great Montana storyteller is Melanie Rae Thon--I'm rereading her collection of short stories "Girls in the Grass."

I'm also reading Gone with the Wind. Never got through it before, so I figured it was time. I may be the only person who doesn't particularly like the movie.
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Posted by M T Zook (+515) 11 years ago
I recently traveled to ND and saw a Louis L'Amour book in the store before I left, so I read "The Lonesome Gods" in honor of my trip to his home state and town. I have read a few of his other works, but this one was very good, couldn't get through it fast enough. There is always some loose history in his books too that keeps me interested.
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Posted by CS Hunt (+328) 11 years ago
Primer of Medical Radiobiology- Travis
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Posted by Dave Golterman (+243) 11 years ago
I have enjoyed Ivan Doig's books immensely too. One of my favorites is "Bucking The Sun" which has a plot line involving the construction of Fort Peck Dam. A friend from high school got mentioned by Doig for providing some background material on the communist movement in NE Montana at the time. That research was expanded into her own non-fiction book which I am reading at this time: Red Corner: The Rise and Fall of Communism in Northeastern Montana by Verlaine Stoner McDonald.

I'm also reading a book by Martin Kidston about the Montana National Guard's 163rd Infantry Regiment in World War II. The book is called "From Poplar to Papua"

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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6165) 11 years ago
Just finished The Man Who Loved Books Too Much by Allison Hoover Bartlett. It's about a man who defrauded antiquarian-book dealers of hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of rare books, one book at a time. It's also about Ken Sanders, the book dealer who made it his mission to catch him. Sanders has a fabulous store here in Salt Lake and also does bits on the Antique Roadshow. It's a fascinating story if you have a passion for books.
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Posted by Brian A. Reed (+6014) 11 years ago
Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes. It's probably the best war fiction I've ever read. Just finished Medium Raw by Anthony Bourdain, which was also outstanding. During my "alone time," I've been reading The Ruins by Scott Smith. It's not bad.
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Posted by gypsykim (+1556) 11 years ago
The Last Crossing by Guy Vanderhaeghe.
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Posted by sdrew (+228) 11 years ago
Rhino Ranch by Larry McMurty. "Sequel" to Texasville and Duane's Depressed. Small town slice of life stuff...kinda like this site!
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 11 years ago
I ordered in a box of reading for the winter months. Two are shaping up to be good reads.

Melvyn Bragg, THE ADVENTURE OF ENGLISH: THE BIOGRAPHY OF A LANGUAGE (2003).

William Urban, BAYONETS FOR HIRE: MERCENARIES AT WAR, 1550-1789 (2007).

As much as folks here enjoy the English language I think many would find Bragg's work interesting. Urban's is a slow read, but it is providing a different perspective on the Wars of Religion, the rise of nation states, and the lead up to the Modern Era.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6165) 11 years ago
Ooohhhh, Hal. Let me know how you like the Bragg book. It sounds like it's right up my alley.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 11 years ago
I'm about a hundred pages into it Wendy . . . I suspect you would enjoy it - you should find a copy. I got my from Edward R. Hamilton Bookseller's online site.

I bet you would also enjoy:

Robert McCrum, William Cran, Robert MacNeil, THE STORY OF ENGLISH (1986).
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 11 years ago
Now here is a great read. Well researched and very well written.

Ever wondered how & why events that played out 2-3000 years ago are relevant today? Read this and you'll begin to understand why history is of some value.

Tom Holland. PERSIAN FIRE: THE FIRST WORLD EMPIRE AND THE BATTLE FOR THE WEST (2005).

Review:
http://www.guardian.co.uk...ianreview4
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Posted by K.Duffy (+1807) 11 years ago
Hal: Isn't that Edward Hamilton a great source? Only about $4.00 shipping, no matter how many books you buy, and I've always received my orders very quickly!

Overstock.com also has pretty good book deals from time to time. I finally broke down and ordered Ken Follett's Fall of the Giants from them. It's interesting so far, but I'm thinking it's going to have to get a lot more 'wintry' around here for me to finish it in less than 3 mths (I'm a slow, easily distracted reader..)
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9919) 11 years ago
Yup . . . I've bought books from Hamilton for 20-25 years. Love to thumb through the newsprint catalogs, though those seem to be on the way out.
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Posted by sdrew (+228) 11 years ago
The Green Mile by Stepehn King. Just had never gotten around to it after I saw the movie.
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Posted by Cheryl Pieters (+474) 11 years ago
I'm reading "The Kite Runner" by Khaled Hosseini. I read "A Thousand Splendid Suns" first and enjoyed it so much that I thought "The Kite Runner" would be really interesting too (and it is). At the Gym I am listening to "White Oleander" by Janet Fitch (an audiobook so I can lift weights without having to balance a book on my knee) and that is a pretty riveting book as well.

[This message has been edited by Cheryl Pieters (11/8/2010)]
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Posted by DaisySibyl (+14) 9 years ago
I am currently reading Moby Dick, as I've never read it. Pretty interesting so far, I have to say.

[link deleted - spam]
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Posted by Promise Plummer (+11) 7 years ago
Just started reading "Pride and Prejudice"
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Posted by Tom Masa (+2042) 7 years ago
Left For Dead..A Second Life After Viet Nam by John Hovde
and
You Can't Always Get What You Want by Sam Cutler
(roadie for the Rolling Stones and the Grateful Dead)
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Posted by heimer (+96) 7 years ago
The Floor of Heaven by Howard Blum.
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Posted by Barb Holcomb (+406) 7 years ago
Monsoon. Robert Kaplan

Thought provoking if you're interested in activities and future of the Indian Ocean, China, India and that part of the world.

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