supporter
Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr. (+14068) 4 years ago
This afternoon I learned of the passing of Jim Michels. Mr. Michels was one of three teachers in my life who had significant impact. He gave me my first job. When I was in the 5th grade I mowed his lawn. He paid me $6.00 each time.

As the VoAg teacher and FFA Advisor. He taught me many skills. I know how to weld, work on equipment, operate a Rumely Oilpull and a the Pioneer tractor because of him. (Not many around anymore that have had those opportunities). I learned how to speak in public and about leadership from Mr. Michels. He is responsible for much of the passion I have for range management and agriculture.

I learned how to dance, because of his encouragement. My favorite memory was a time when he came up to Monty Lesh, Tate Nation, and myself at a FFA-FHA function and said " as FFA officers and seniors, you boys should show some leadership and ask the girls to dance.

Miles City has lost an icon. He will be greatly missed. Rest in peace, Captain, rest in peace.
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+6
Posted by Beth R. Riggs (+309) 4 years ago
He was a great neighbor, FFA advisor, teacher, dancer, community member, tractor driver, pilot and person. My husband says that he learned how to shake hands and look a person in the eyes from Jim. We will really miss him in Miles City. May we learn from his example.
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+5
supporter
Posted by cj sampsel (+481) 4 years ago
Also one of my favorite teachers at CCHS. I learned everything mentioned in the first 2 posts from him, too. I remember as a senior I was sneaking out the back from an assembly w/ Marc Trimmer and Donnie Brown. He caught us, they ran I didn't. After the ,What are you doing running around with those two hoodlums lecture? he put me to work on some projects. There were others from ag class also working in there. So whenever we wanted to escape an assembly we could go to the
shop and work on things. I still ran around w/those hoodlums though.
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+2
supporter
Posted by Ken Minow (+377) 4 years ago
I also had the great pleasure to operate both the Rumley and the Pioneer.Both amazing machines.The Pioneer steered by winding/unwinding chains to both sides of the front axle.The operator had a two speed gearbox for steering.All I remember was you started spinning the steering wheel about 5 minutes before the turn,even at a couple miles per hour!
Now the Rumley-I gave it too much fuel[the more fuel the more smoke]and it quit[flooded]right in front of the courthouse at the BHS parade.It had to be hand cranked using the rungs of a huge flywhhel.I was frantically attempting to get it started[while being barraged by drunk cowboys yelling"get a horse".Cap'n pulled up in the old Buick-I can safely say the Irish was "ired".Just then the old girl let out a huge belch and blew about 10 gallons of nasty oil out the stack,most of which landed on nearby spectators,but it started up.After that my top priority was to get gone fast,but that's not easy when your mode of transportation goes about 4 mph wide open.
I too learned the proper handshaking method,parlimentary procedure,etc.from Mr. Michels.There's so much more I coulda learned from Jim,but unfortunately about 17 years old I began to think I knew pretty much everything.
Now about "escaping" assemblies,Howard Letke caught me going out a classroom window[they were posting sentries at all the entrance/exits.]He fined me 1 jelly donut for a month[which he paid for but I had to retrieve/deliver.]Fred Anderson,Howard Letke,and Jim Micheals great teachers and great people.They made you want to learn. "I coulda missed the pain,but Ida had to miss the dance"RIP 'Cap"n.
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+2