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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9858) 6 years ago


“How Andrew Carnegie Built the Architecture of American Literacy”
By Kriston Capps
CITY LAB
Oct 28, 2014
http://www.citylab.com/de...cy/381953/
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Posted by Jett (+86) 6 years ago
wasn`t he a 1%er or 2%er or something?
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9858) 6 years ago
"Every little bean must be heard as well as seen!"
--Erich M. Remarque (1898-1970)
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Posted by Wil Nelson (+71) 6 years ago
At the time more like the top1/10 of 1%.
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Posted by Jett (+86) 6 years ago
Brilliant man who did not exactly starve to death lol.
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Posted by Amorette F. Allison (+1914) 6 years ago
He paid no income tax yet elected to give back to those less fortunate.

Although there were down sides. He built the buildings but that was it. The library here opened with a bunch of government brochures on agriculture and some donated books.

And insisted on the libraries being named after him. Just a hint of ego there.

[This message has been edited by Amorette F. Allison (10/31/2014)]
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Posted by Elizabeth Emilsson (+795) 6 years ago
Wasn't he considered as one of the Robber Barons, like John D. Rockefeller, turned philanthropist. You can always consider that paying decent, livable wages as a sort of philanthropy also.
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Posted by MilesCity.com Webmaster (+9998) 6 years ago
Wikipedia is your friend.

Wikipedia wrote:
List of businessmen who were labeled as robber barons

The people here are listed in Josephson, Robber Barons or in the cited source,

[1] John Jacob Astor (real estate, fur) – New York
[2] Andrew Carnegie (steel) – Pittsburgh and New York
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http://en.wikipedia.org/w...strialist)

Wikipedia wrote:
Andrew Carnegie (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish American industrialist who led the enormous expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century. He was also one of the highest profile philanthropists of his era and had given away almost 90 percent – amounting to, in 1919, $350 million (in 2014, $4.76 billion) – of his fortune to charities and foundations by the time of his death. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and stimulated a wave of philanthropy.

Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, and emigrated to the United States with his very poor parents in 1848. Carnegie started as a telegrapher and by the 1860s had investments in railroads, railroad sleeping cars, bridges and oil derricks. He accumulated further wealth as a bond salesman raising money for American enterprise in Europe. He built Pittsburgh's Carnegie Steel Company, which he sold to J.P. Morgan in 1901 for $480 million (in 2014, $13.6 billion), creating the U.S. Steel Corporation. Carnegie devoted the remainder of his life to large-scale philanthropy, with special emphasis on local libraries, world peace, education and scientific research. With the fortune he made from business, he built Carnegie Hall, and founded the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Carnegie Institution for Science, Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland, Carnegie Hero Fund, Carnegie Mellon University and the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, among others. His life has often been referred to as a true "rags to riches" story.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/w...w_Carnegie
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Posted by worldmom (+420) 6 years ago
Such a beautiful building before they slapped that brown monstrosity on the front of it.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9858) 6 years ago
Yeah, it was pretty cool looking building before the remodel. But the remodel opened up more shelf space for books, and that’s a good thing for a library. So I suppose it was a good trace off.
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Posted by Elizabeth Emilsson (+795) 6 years ago
Thank you, Webmaster, for reminding me I have Wikipedia, in stead of relying on my 78 year old brain to recall the history I learned in my college years over 50 years ago.
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