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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9335) 5 years ago
Rain damages barley crop in Montana, Idaho
http://www.kboi2.com/news...71131.html
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+13658) 5 years ago
Yeah, I saw that. I will definitely have to stock up.

Funny how all the rain we got this summer caused some harm as well as good. I have been out grouse hunting a few times, and the grass is four feet tall. There are a gazillion rabbits everywhere you go.

With the rain and cold that moved in, I have been picking hops the last few days. Excellent crop of hops this year as well. I am going to brew fresh hop ale hopefully tomorrow.


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Posted by Elizabeth Emilsson (+788) 5 years ago
Your hops crops are tops.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9335) 5 years ago
Nice looking hops. Hops that fresh should make for very flavorful ale. What variety do you grow?

It’s been an odd weather year here too (guess we all need to get used to new normals). We had a dry spring and now a wet autumn, which is kind of the reverse of “normal.” Not much for berries this fall, but that’s okay – I’m getting too old for stoop labor like that : -)

Saw a few spruce hens (our version of grouse) the other morning. If I don’t have to work all weekend, I may go for a walk Saturday or Sunday and knock down a couple with the .22. The arctic hare population is at the bottom end of the boom & bust cycle here. 2 -3 years ago I could take a 30 minute stroll in the brush behind the house and come back with 3 or 4 “rabbits” for dinner. Now they’re a rare sight. I’m curious to see how long it will take for the numbers to rebound.

It’s moose season right now, but fools hens are sure easier to pack home than moose . . . so I’ll settle for a couple birds. It seems to me to be a little warm to be hunting moose anyway. I’ve not heard of folks doing well at the hunt, so maybe the warmth doesn't matter. There’s a second season in January, maybe it will be cooler then : -)

I bottled a high gravity porter the weekend before last. It shows early promise of being a good beer.

I brewed 14 gallons of ale last Sunday. Pitched it with Wyeast 1388 and was generous with the hops. I’m hoping it will be ready to drink sometime around Christmas – it’s always good to have a strong, hoppy beer to carry us through the dark season.

It did not take long at all for profiteering to set in when it comes to malt prices. I almost always brew partial extract beers (shipping challenges have a lot to do with that). Last June I paid $2.48 per pound, delivered, for a 45lb bag of amber DME. Last night I paid $3.12 per lb, delivered, to the same retailer for 90lbs of DME. As I looked around, I saw some sellers were asking $4.10 per pound. The actual shortage (if there is one) won’t kick in until around this time next year, so this will be a profitable fall for some folks.
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Posted by neonfreedom (+293) 5 years ago
Okay so since I can't post pictures, I can't show u but, I think I have these growing on my privacy screen outside around our porch,we just thought they were weeds and never looked any further into it, my question, should we take them down or just leave them up? it was all here before we moved in and it's been 5 years!
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+13658) 5 years ago
Hal, I grow Cascades. I used to grow some European varieties (Hallertauer, Saaz, Tettnanger), but they never did much, so when we moved a couple of years ago, I only dug up the Cascades. They make a nice fresh hop ale.

NF, as you already found in the past 5 years, it doesn't matter whether you cut them down or leave them up, they will come back again next year. No reason to take them down unless you know a home brewer who would like to brew with them.
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Posted by neonfreedom (+293) 5 years ago
Lol, we actually have never tried to cut them, just kept them for more privacy coverage, but if they are in fact the same as in the pic and someone is wanting to come pick them for use then please by all means be my guest!
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9335) 5 years ago
Hmmm . . . I wonder how they’d do here? Perhaps I’ll try to come up with rhizomes for one of the hardier varieties and give it a shot. At worst they’d just not grow. I suppose that would actually be for the best. If they flourished, then I’d be responsible for introducing an invasive species.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+13658) 5 years ago
Hal, it is my understanding that you are too far north. Hops grow best between the 35th and 55th parallel, best at the 45th. I have heard that hops grow great in Alaska, but for some reason they don't produce flowers very well.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9335) 5 years ago
Well, at 58 41 N we are kind of in the latitudinal ballpark. Our climate is maritime influenced. Lots of daylight in the summers. They probably wouldn’t flower – but if I get bored this winter (which happens when there isn’t a lot of daylight), I might do some research and order a couple rhizomes.
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