More Grammar Pet Peeves
supporter
Posted by Kelly (+2618) 6 years ago
#4 is mine. Wendy?
Top
supporter
Posted by SeptyTwo (+665) 6 years ago
# 10 applies to me alot
Top
supporter
Posted by K.Duffy (+1795) 6 years ago
Here's one I never hear anyone mention, but I really notice it when it's used: "Take and put..."

How about, "and stuff" in place of a period to end a sentence?
Top
Posted by Ineedsun (+184) 6 years ago
I have tons of grammar pet peeves but here are two that are right up there: "Her and I went to the store, etc." and "I seen". Argh!
Top
supporter
Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6170) 6 years ago
I hate it when folks use words they don't know the meaning of. Here are some examples:
Nonplussed
Enormity
Literally
Momentarily

These are just a few.
Top
supporter
Posted by Jeri Dalbec (+3146) 6 years ago
Regard and Regards...
Top
Posted by Mathew Schmitz (+289) 6 years ago
I was momentarily nonplussed.......but soon became literally stunned by the enormity of it all. How did I do?
Top
Posted by Jesse Smith (+416) 6 years ago
"for sell" instead of "for sale"

Oh, and the price is 85$ instead of $85.
Top
Posted by Kacey (+3152) 6 years ago
I was taught to never end a sentence with a preposition.
Top
supporter
Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6170) 6 years ago
I was momentarily nonplussed.......but soon became literally stunned by the enormity of it all. How did I do?


Mathew,

Hard to tell. Your sentence is too general to determine if you've the terms correctly.

Kacey,

Ending a sentence with a preposition is sometimes necessary to avoid clunky construction. There is no absolute ban on it.
Top
supporter
sponsor
Posted by Frank Hardy (+1486) 6 years ago
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dollar_sign

In the United States, Mexico, Australia, Argentina, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Pacific Island nations, and English-speaking Canada, the dollar or peso symbol precedes the number, unlike most currency symbols. Five dollars or pesos is written and printed as $5, whereas five cents is written as 5ยข. In French-speaking Canada, the dollar symbol usually appears after the number (5$), although it sometimes appears in front of it, or instead may even be totally absent.


FH
Top
supporter
Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr. (+14728) 6 years ago
The rule I learned from the nuns was "a preposition is what you don't end sentence with". Everyone knows that wrong is something the nuns never are.
Top
supporter
Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6170) 6 years ago
Really? How would you reword this sentence: "That dress has not yet been paid for."
Top
supporter
Posted by howdy (+4949) 6 years ago
That lady has not yet paid for the dress????
Top
supporter
Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+16669) 6 years ago
My biggest grammer pet peeve is the misuse of the apostrophe s.
Top
Posted by Juan Agular (+48) 6 years ago
or, STOP! Call the law. That Mexican is stealing a dress.

That's what usually happens to me. Especially if I'm shopping in drag.
Top
supporter
Posted by Amorette F. Allison (+1910) 6 years ago
Split infinitives and ending a sentence with a preposition all date back to when a bunch of stuffy English public school grammarians decided English had to follow the same rules as Latin, in spite of their not being all that similar. You can't split an infinitive in Latin. It's one word.

Today, we can toss a lot of those old rules and accept that English is a growing language. That said, we need to keep a certain amount of consistency or we are either misunderstood or evolve mutually unintelligible languages.

I still twitch at "alot" but I understand that "apron" used to be a napron and centuries of muttering gave us an apron instead.
Top
Posted by Juan Agular (+48) 6 years ago
Split infinitives, in-fin-it-ives, there. No big whoop, crazy gabachos.
Top
supporter
Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6170) 6 years ago
Howdy,

You changed the sentence, not just rearranged it. See, it's hard.

Juan,

Ha, ha! You are hysterical! Thanks for the laugh.
Top
supporter
Posted by howdy (+4949) 6 years ago
well, even changing the sentence, while I realized I did that, it seems to be the same meaning, thus my thought process...oh well, I still was drilled at a young and tender age that there was never to be ending a sentence with a preposition...guess I am too old to change it now LOL...
Top
Posted by Left_in_1954 (+16) 6 years ago
That dress has not been paid for yet.
Top
supporter
Posted by MRH (+1480) 6 years ago
Personally, I find the inclusion of yet in this sentence to be a bit awkward. I am also 'old school' and do not end sentences with prepositions. However, I noticed this occurring more often with young authors during my last days of reviewing and editing scientific articles.
Top
Posted by jj&j (+56) 6 years ago
" That dress has not yet been purchased "

[This message has been edited by jj&j (7/29/2014)]
Top
supporter
Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6170) 6 years ago
Steve had no one to play with.

Steve had no one with whom to play.


Which sentence do you prefer?
Top
supporter
Posted by MRH (+1480) 6 years ago
Steve had no one to play with.

Steve had no one with whom to play.


Which sentence do you prefer?


Neither!

Steve had no play mates.
Top
supporter
Posted by Jeri Dalbec (+3146) 6 years ago
This has been a "fun" thread. I went to school when grammar was still a bit stuffy. We used lots of adjectives and commas. The sentences would have looked a bit like: "Steve, a cantankerous ruffian, found himself without a playmate".

A lot has changed over the years and I find that I am not critical of others. I would hate to see someone quit expressing themselves because of being unsure about their grammar:-)
Top
Posted by Juan Agular (+48) 6 years ago
My writing style has been referred to as stilted. I'm Okay with that.
Top
supporter
Posted by MRH (+1480) 6 years ago
A lot has changed over the years and I find that I am not critical of others. I would hate to see someone quit expressing themselves because of being unsure about their grammar:-)


I agree totally. I am not critical, unless someone asks me to be. Most authors that I reviewed for, knew things that I would mark. Reviewer's comments are just for an author's consideration and not set in concrete.

One of the most important considerations when writing for support and understanding of a cause is being concise, as well as, presenting information in a easy to read format. If it gets too long or wordy, some folks will simply not read it until you provide a 'Cliffs Notes' version.
Top
supporter
Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6170) 6 years ago
Mother, I have no playmates!


You got beat up a lot in school, didn't you, MRH?
Top
supporter
Posted by MRH (+1480) 6 years ago
You got beat up a lot in school, didn't you, MRH?


Not really, but I have been beat up by some really tough reviewers over the years. That is really an interesting interpretation on your part!
Top
Posted by Athanera (+3) 6 years ago


Enjoy!
Top
Posted by Elizabeth Emilsson (+790) 6 years ago
I did enjoy that.
Top
supporter
Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6170) 6 years ago
Here's a question for you. Why is there a prevelance of people pronouncing the word "tour" to rhyme with "more"? I have always pronounced it so it rhymes more closely with "sewer" said quickly. What say you?
Top
supporter
Posted by MRH (+1480) 6 years ago
sewer
Top
supporter
Posted by Jeri Dalbec (+3146) 6 years ago
Sewer!
Top
supporter
Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+16669) 6 years ago
You live in Utah where people say "Warshington". Why would you care?
Top
supporter
Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6170) 6 years ago
Because I grew up with an english teacher for a mom. Living in Utah has literally cut 5 years from my lifespan. And I mean, literally.
Top
Posted by Oddjob (+187) 6 years ago
"You live in Utah where people say "Warshington". Why would you care?"

Now that's funny, coming from you.

I grew up in Miles City in a house full of Micks, but I say "Warshington", which we all picked up from exposure to the NoDak Swedes and Norwegians.

I wish I had a nickle for every time I had to listen to "It's WASH-ing-ton, not WARSH-ing-ton!"

Listen to yourselves. I'll bet most of you say it.
Top
supporter
Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6170) 6 years ago
I grew up in Montana with a midwesterner and a New Englander. I went to college with folks from all over the country. I lived in the South for 3 years. The range of American accents is truly amazing.
Top
supporter
Posted by cj sampsel (+484) 6 years ago
I noticed the pronunciation of wash very soon after to moving to the Miles City in 1966. Almost everyone was going to warsh their hands.
They also pronounced often using the t.
Top