1890 Murder of Hugh Boyle by two Cheyenne
Posted by LuAnn Rittenhouse (+30) 6 years ago
I found an interesting 5-page magazine article from 1900 for sale on ebay about the 1890 murder of a boy named Hugh Boyle who was visiting his grandparents place near the Tongue River Reservation when he was murdered by two young Cheyenne men named Head Chief & Young Mule... had never heard of it before - quite interesting.

For any interested collectors out there, just search ebay for "Tongue River Boyle" & the listing should come up - $9.50 buy it now + $3.25 shipping, ends Weds. Jan. 22nd. (Ya, I'd like it, but I just blew all my Christmas money, so thought a local person may be interested in owning it.)
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Posted by LuAnn Rittenhouse (+30) 6 years ago
Thank you for posting the link! :0)

This seller also has an article from 1900 - FAX machine invented! And another article from 1901 - WIRE LESS Telephone invented!!! What??? Now I KNOW I've been living under a rock -lol!
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Posted by MilesCity.com Webmaster (+9694) 6 years ago
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Posted by ike eichler (+1229) 6 years ago
And the rest of the story or perhaps just the end of the story.

Boyle probably had it coming, as he had pushed a Cheyenne woman into a water trough, Quirted across the face Heart Mule as well as other mistreatment of the Cheyenne's.

The Army was called out along with the Indian police to bring closure to the case. It was agreed by the Chiefs that the 3, Heart Mule, Two Coyotes, and Head Chief would, unarmed, charge the combined force. The expected result was all three were killed. Both parties were satisfied that justice had been done.
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Posted by LuAnn Rittenhouse (+30) 6 years ago
I found this on Find-A-Grave under Barney Lynch's page (he was Hugh's uncle) - things get curiouser & curiouser... I wonder just how many stories are out there about this Hugh Boyle...

http://www.findagrave.com...d=39903216

"While no record documents the following, it is highly likely that Barney visited his brother Patrick Hugh Lynch and baby sister, Ellen Lynch Gaffney, living on Rosebud Creek in Custer County in the spring of 1891. In September of 1890,a young nephew of the trio named Hugh Boyle was killed by two Cheyenne Indians when he discovered the pair butchering one of the milk cows he was looking for. Hugh had been staying with the Gaffney family for the summer, having come to the dry Montana climate on doctor's orders. He, and a sister who remained in Illinois, had been diagnosed with tuberculosis earlier in the year. Hugh's mother was Kitty Lynch Boyle.

Oral tradition in the Mahoney family placed Hugh's murder at about the same time as the sister's death from tuberculosis back in Illinois. Kitty and Pat Boyle were distraught with the loss of two children so close together, one in such a tragedy. The grieving mother's anger focused on her Montana brother and sister – Patrick H. Lynch and Ellen Lynch Gaffney. She accused them of not informing her of the serious danger Hugh would be placed in if/when he came to Montana. Communication amongst the three shattered. Hugh Boyle's body was buried temporarily on the Rosebud, no doubt on the Gaffney homestead, though no record remains of the burial. In the spring, a family member from Illinois came to Montana and escorted the body back to Champaign where it was interred in St. Mary's Church cemetery where other family members are buried. It seems highly likely that Barney Lynch may well have been the one who came west to bring his nephew's remains back to Illinois."

Says this account is undocumented, but is quite similar to info in the 1900 article - thinking the magazine got their info from the family & might not have gotten all the facts???
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Posted by LuAnn Rittenhouse (+30) 6 years ago
Here is info from Patrick Hugh Lynch's Find-A-Grave page:

http://www.findagrave.com...d=6739709&

"Patrick H. Lynch and Family

On May 7, 1827, Patrick Hugh Lynch was born the second son in a family that grew to number eight. He spent his boyhood years in Cavan County, Ireland, where he was born. Among his childhood playmates in this village was his cousin, Marcus Daly. At the age of 39 Patrick married Margret Callan, also of Irish ancestry.

Sixteen years (1882) and eight children later, the Patrick Lynch family moved from their Irish homeland to 'the Rosebud.' (See note below.)

The move was a result of encouragement from Marcus Daly, Mr. Lynch's cousin. Marcus was the first to seek out the new frontier in America, and once here, began writing to encourage other members of his family to come and join him. Marcus became known as one of the Anaconda Copper Kings and a political figure in Montana history.

Marcus had acquired a sizable herd of cattle. He had two men in charge of them with their cow camp located near the junction of Lame Deer and Rosebud Creeks. One of the men was killed by a horse. The remaining man was in failing health due to tuberculosis. Patrick Lynch's brother, Jack, had made the trip to America and was at Butte with Marcus when word came of the cowhand's death. Marcus asked Jack Lynch to take the job as a cowhand, and he consented. Shortly after Jack arrived at the Cow Camp, the second cowhand died. Jack seized upon this opportunity to encourage his brother, Patrick, via letter, to come to America and bring his family, offering them a place to live and a job as a cowhand for Marcus.

In 1882 the Patrick Lynch's left Ireland bound for America. with stops along the way to visit other family members already located in Illinois, it was a full year's journey until they were to reach Rosebud, Montana by the Northern Pacific Railroad. It was October. Jack Lynch, Patrick's brother who was running Marcus Daly's operation in Rosebud County, met them with a team and covered wagon, and drove them to their new home, the cow camp house at the present site of Lame Deer. This was later homesteaded by Patrick's daughter, Katie Lynch Toohey.

Patrick H. Lynch became a citizen in 1884 and established squatter's rights on land up Lame Deer Creek adjoining the Daly Cow Camp. This was later filed as a homestead. He was engaged in the cattle business until the reservation was formed in 1900. At that time the government bought out all the settlers having land within the boundary for the reservation. He was one of these, along with the Alderson's, Schaudel's and George Mendenhall.

The Patrick Lynch children grew up with both white children and Indian children as associates, several of them becoming proficient in the Cheyenne language. The son, Hugh, was known by the Cheyennes as "Wee-he-kiss' meaning "Little White Boy." Their oldest daughter Mary was adopted into the Cheyenne Tribe and given the name "Ameonie" - Great White Walking Woman."

(So Patrick had a son named Hugh Lynch, & his sister who married Pat Boyle had a son she named Hugh Boyle - the one who was murdered. There are a lot of guys named "Hugh" in this family... -LR)

"Patrick Lynch had been in Montana only 7 years when a young nephew, Hugh Boyle, came from Chicago for a visit (1890.) (See note.) A routine ride to gather the milk cows ended in Hugh's tragic death. It is thought that he came upon some Indians butchering white man's beef, and they killed him. It was nearly a week before his body was found where the Indians had made a shallow grave, covering the body with shale. After the body was removed, Two Moons gathered rocks and laid them in the formation of a man's body, arms, and legs. He used a skull-shaped stone for the head and smaller rocks to signify clenched fists. The two Indians guilty of the murder, Head Chief and Young Mule, were shot before a firing squad at the Lame Deer Agency. Rose Lynch and Mrs. Upshaw were in the Upshaw cellar in Lame Deer during the execution.

The Lynch family listened to the sound of the rifles at the old Lynch place, a mile or so out of Lame Deer. When all was quiet, John McRae, Patrick Lynch, son Hugh and daughter Katherine went to Lame Deer in a wagon to verify that the Indians were dead.

Mr. Lynch did not blame the Indians for what they had done. He felt that starvation forced them to butcher other men's beef. This friendship with the Indians was a two-way street."

So yet another story with some similarities, yet very big differences as to the execution of the murderers...

This info was entered onto Find-A-Grave by Catherine Byron who apparently got it from Lynch family descendants (she may be related). She has included a ton of other info on the Lynch family including their passage from Ireland to America; more on the Patrick Lynch family living in Montana, including interesting story about the "Hoover scare" & discovering that St. Labre's had been started in Ashland; also the process they went thru with the gov. when the reservation was formed for the Cheyenne - excerpts from legal documents, some signed by James McLaughlin, US Indian Inspector, plus dealing with the water rights, with names of other neighbors being mentioned.

Sorry I seem to be having trouble getting the links to work - must be doing it wrong - can anyone tell me how to do this correctly, please? Thank you.
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Posted by LuAnn Rittenhouse (+30) 6 years ago
Okay, for anyone interested: Catherine Byron is descended from this Lynch family - if you want to check out her webpage: www.byronscorner.com it's very interesting. Apparently she's in the process of writing a book about Hugh's murder, which I would be very interested in reading.

I also found an entry on this website MilesCity.com under History > People > Family Biographies on an Alice Lynch Bailey - a daughter to Patrick Hugh Lynch, so she was 1st cousin to Hugh Boyle. Many of you may have already read this article. It doesn't mention Hugh Boyle, but does share stories of the Lynch family's life in the Lame Deer area from about 1883 on, & the kids going to school at St. Labre's.
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Posted by Cathy Byron (+12) 6 years ago
I just caught wind of this discussion this evening. So sorry the article on eBay was sold before I got to review it closely.

The Hugh Boyle Incident has been frequently written, but never written accurately. I've never heard of a water trough, etc., etc., involved in the incident. It was truly a tragic event for both the Lynch family (Irish immigrants in 1883) and the Northern Cheyenne. My goal is to publish a collection of primary source materials and simply allow the reader to draw their own conclusions. Hoping to get that project wrapped up in 2014. I've only been collecting for 40 years! I posted the information on the Lynch family and the incident on Find a Grave.
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Posted by LuAnn Rittenhouse (+30) 6 years ago
Hi Cathy! I'm so glad you replied!

I'm so sorry you missed out on the ebay listing - I saw this afternoon that it had sold. Sometimes when I shop on there, I do a random check for things I've been interested in lately (Tongue River) & that's how I found the article's listing. If I come across anything else on Hugh Boyle or the Lynch family on ebay, I'll try to let you know ASAP...

I want to thank you so much for your dedication to your ancestors & relatives - the Find-A-Grave info was so detailed! I've done a lot of family research on many of our lines, & it gets so frustrating when one hits a dead-end or simply can't find anything at all to start out with. So I'm so very happy when I find that someone has made the effort to record, in some way or another, information on their family tree. Some things may not seem important now, but you never know when some little bit of info may be needed by someone for something important.

I look forward to reading your completed book!
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Posted by LuAnn Rittenhouse (+30) 6 years ago
Cathy,

Have you read or heard of this particular article before? If not, you can click on the link above which will take you to the "listing ended page" & then at the end of the title, click on the blue words "see original listing" which will take you there. You can hold your cursor over the photos to use the zoom feature & read most of the article. There are parts that are chopped off, but you can pretty much fill in the blanks, & I think the photos or drawings in the article are all viewable. The listing should be available for at least 60 days after sale, but I don't think the seller is required to keep the photos up, so hopefully you can read it soon, if you haven't already.

Also, you may already know this, but when you go on ebay, you can use the "Advanced Search" button to search current & previous listings for certain keywords (be sure to check the box for "in titles & descriptions") - you could enter "Hugh Boyle" & see if anything else is or was for sale...
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Posted by carol bailey (+13) 6 years ago
I don't know where you got that version of the story but it's untrue. This story is part of my husbands family heritage.

The true story is much more tragic than that.

The three characters involved were very young ..just teenagers.. the youngest only fourteen, the others seventeen and sixteen.. just kids.

Head Chief was hot headed, the other boy was a follower. Hugh was a kid from back east who had come to spend some time on his relatives homestead in Montana. One of his jobs was to bring the milk cow in at night.

at that time the Cheyenne were not being treated very well by the Army and the agents.The food they were given was bad, much of it they were supposed to be getting was taken by soldiers. What they got was often rotten and worm infested. They were hungry.

Head Chief had a quarrel with his girlfriend and was going to prove his manhood by getting food. He and Young Mule went hunting. they saw the milk cow and shot it. As they were gutting it out, Hugh Boyle road up on them horseback. Words were exchanged and Head Swift shot Hugh.

They realized they had to get rid of the body so loaded him up and took him a ways away. His hat fell off where he fell. As soon as his family realized he should be back and wasn’t they went looking. A search party was organized when his bloody hat was found along with the butchered cow.
My memory of the search fails me but he was eventually found. The elders of the tribe got word to the boys that they had to turn themselves in and accept the punishment. They told their people the days were gone when they could murder whites and they must learn to live together.

The boys sentence was death. In order to die a warriors death , they chose to die “fighting” so agreed to ride down a hill which is in the middle of the town of Lame Deer now, carrying their weapons while the soldiers were lined up with rifles. The soldiers fired a volley of shots and the boys fell of their horses, dead. They had died warriors so were worthy to spend eternity in the “Happy Hunting Grounds”.

The Elders ordered a monument made of flat rocks that were laid out in the shape of Hugh Boyle as he died. They are still there. Some of the older Indians met with Jack a year or two ago about having some kind of ceremony there but we never heard anything more about that.

I don’t remember if it was the Uncle or the grandfather of Hugh Boyle, who on his death bed said he forgave the murderers because they were driven by hunger.


A little side note on Young Mule, he had no family to speak of and when he was sentenced, he said he had no one and nothing to live for without Head Chief so chose to accept the same fate. He was fourteen years old..
This is in reply to Ike Ekcler's letter concerning a quirt and a water trough.

[This message has been edited by carol bailey (1/19/2014)]

[This message has been edited by carol bailey (1/19/2014)]
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Posted by ike eichler (+1229) 6 years ago
Carol,

I suspect that all accounts including oral histories will have somewhat of different slants to this tragic affair. For example, most accounts say it was 2 Cheyenne youths rather than three

1889-1890 was a period of unrest in Indian country due to the rising Ghost Dance craze. The Northern Cheyenne reservation was not directly involved but was certainly aware.

My source was an article by Ralph Hambrick where he quotes newspaper accounts by editor Keller of the weekly Montana Democrat-Gazette newspaper painting Boyle as a bully who was an Indian tormenter, and detailing the incidents mentioned. The article goes on to say that according to Meredith Hayes, THE CIVILIZATION OF MONTANA Boyles was enroute to a box social at the Linwood School when he came upon the Indians butchering one of his uncles steers. After an altercation he was pulled from his horse and beat to death with his own quirt.

Hugh Gaffney. the uncle had told the chief that any Cheyenne without meat for his family could kill one of his steer's

The next morning September 12, 1889 was the date the 3 made their charge and the sentence of to Die With Honor.

what we all agree on is the event took place with the same start and ending.
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Posted by Forest B. Dunning (+29) 4 years ago
Hi All,
I have been reviewing all the material available on the Hugh Boyle murder for the past year in preparation for my upcoming book "Between Two Tribes". While there are many versions as to what happened, how it happened, and events leading up to the murder, there has been a lot of confusion over the years as memories dimmed and became mixed with other events. In reviewing the above posts, I believe Carol Bailey's account is the most correct. There is actually considerable first hand information available in the public record. Lt. S.C. Robertson, Commander of the two 1st Calvary Troops who killed Head Chief and Young Mule wrote an article in Harper's Weekly entitled "A Rush To Death" about the event only a month after it happened. Artist Walter Shirwell was present at the event and penned a sketch of Head Chief's charge through the soldier line. He just chanced to be in Lame Deer helping with the Cheyenne census when Hugh Boyle was killed. He also wrote and article about the affair. Pat Lynch wrote a letter several years later to a historian who contacted him. I have copies of all the above documents. The Cheyenne version is well documented in "Cheyenne Memories" by Margot Liberty and John Stands-in-Timber. Jules Chaudel, a cook at Camp Merrit in Thomas Marquis book "The Cheyennes of Montana", describes the event in great detail. By the way I am a distant relation of Carol Bailey's and grew up at Birney, MT near the Cheyenne Reservation.
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Posted by ZZZzz (-550) 4 years ago
Then there is the Sheriff I think it was in Terry who accidentally shot two prisoners to death in their cell(s).Not sure of the details just read about it on a marker along the road.They must have been standing one behind the other when the Sheriff`s firearm accidentally discharged or something is all I can figure.
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