Black Friday/Thursday at Walmart
Posted by KMuscha (+136) 8 years ago
I have never joined the crowds on Black Friday, but I am considering giving it a go this year. From what I understand Walmart has deals starting on Thursday evening. Does anyone know how crowded it gets at the Miles City Walmart? How early do I need to get there? I understand it is a bit of a competition, but if you have any tips for me I would appreciate it. My daughter REALLY wants one of the items they have on special on Thursday evening, and I am hoping Santa can get one for a good price. Thanks!
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Posted by neonfreedom (+290) 8 years ago
Pretty crowded and crazy!but do able!
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr. (+14950) 8 years ago
I would encourage you NOT to shop Walmart on Thursday (or ever). This article says it much better than I can say it. I have pulled the most important part of the article for those of you with short attention spans and the emphasis is mine:

Capitalism is great, but some things are greater. Family is greater. Yes, these folks choose to work at these stores. Yes, they likely knew when they signed up that they'd be sacrificing their Thanksgivings. Yes, at least they have jobs. Yes, sure, and so what? If that's enough in your mind to justify participating in the destruction of a great American tradition -- good for you. But you COULD wait until Friday, couldn't you? And if you did wait until Friday, and if everyone waited until Friday, no store would ever open on Thanksgiving again, right? So you COULD take steps to protect Thanksgiving from the decay of materialism and consumerism, and, while you're at it, give this wonderful holiday back to the customer service representatives who have been forced to abandon it and cater to the stampeding throngs, right?

Right, but then again, those skirts at JC Penney ARE super cheap.

Oh Lord, if you don't go on Thursday to buy stuff, there might be slightly less stuff available on Friday! Think of the stuff! We must get all the stuff! The stuff must be purchased!

Family can take a backseat.

Tradition can wait.

These employees should just be grateful for the opportunity to stand behind a cash register for 14 hours while the rest of us eat our pies and drink our wine.

Thanksgiving is just a holiday.

But stuff, things, toys, gadgets -- these are what life is all about.

Why give thanks for what you have when there's so much you don't have? That's the new meaning of Thanksgiving: count your blessings, and then buy some more blessings and count them again.


Here is the article in its entirety:

If You Shop on Thanksgiving, You Are Part of the Problem
Posted: 11/20/2013 12:03 pm

I'm a capitalist. It's not my religion, I won't bow before its altar, I won't kiss its ring, but I believe in capitalism. It's an invention of man and it involves money, so it's not perfect, but I've never heard anyone suggest a better system. So I'm a capitalist.

I am not, however, a consumerist. I like the freedom and innovation of capitalism; I loathe the materialism and gluttony of consumerism. There's a popular misconception that capitalism and consumerism are inextricably linked; that one naturally involves and requires the other. But this is a fallacy. Certainly the "stimulus" programs a few years ago ought to have dispelled this notion entirely. The government perverted the free market and elected to hand free money to millions of people, hoping that they'd go out and buy a bunch of stuff with it. This was consumerism at the expense of capitalism, and it revealed our priorities: forget freedom, forget principle -- just buy stuff.

That's our entire economic system: buy things. Everybody buy. It doesn't matter what you buy. Just buy. It doesn't matter if you don't have money. Just buy. Our entire civilization now rests on the assumption that, no matter what else happens, we will all continue to buy lots and lots of things. Buy, buy, buy, buy, buy. And then buy a little more. Don't create, or produce, or discover -- just buy. Never save, never invest, never cut back -- just buy. Buy what you don't need with money you don't have. Buy when you're happy. Buy when you're sad. Buy when you're hungry. Buy when you want to lose weight. Buy an iPhone. Six months have passed, here, buy another iPhone. Go online and buy things. Go to the mall and buy things. On your way, stop and buy some more things. Buy things for every occasion. Buy things to celebrate. Buy things to mourn. Buy things to keep up with the trends. Buy things while you're buying things, and then buy a couple more things after you're done buying things. If you want it -- buy it. If you don't want it -- buy it. Don't make it -- buy it. Don't grow it -- buy it. Don't cultivate it -- buy it. We need you to buy. We don't need you to be a human, we don't need you to be a citizen, we don't need you to be a capitalist, we just need you to be a consumer, a buyer. If you are alive you must buy. Buy like you breathe, only more frequently.

How appropriate, then, that a holiday created by our ancestors as an occasion to give thanks for what they had, now morphs into a frenzied consumerist ritual where we descend upon shopping malls to accumulate more things we don't need. Our great grandparents enjoyed a meal and praised the Lord for the food on the table and the friends and family gathered around it. We, having slightly altered the tradition, instead elect to bum-rush elderly women and trample over children to get our hands on cheap TVs.

For a while, Black Friday and Thanksgiving coexisted. We thanked God for His blessings on Thursday, and then jumped into the consumer mosh pit at Best Buy on Friday. But this Black Friday-Thanksgiving marriage was tenuous and rocky from the start. It was doomed to fail. Thanksgiving offers tradition, family and contentment; Black Friday offers smart phones at drastically reduced prices. In America, we all know who wins that battle. So Black Friday, like a black hole, violently expanded; it absorbed the light that surrounded it and sucked everything into its terrifying abyss, where all substance is torn to shreds and obliterated. Black Friday could not be contained to a mere 24 hours. It is Consumerism. It wants more. It always wants more. Nothing is sacred to it; nothing is valuable. So, now, Black Friday has eaten Thanksgiving alive. Thanksgiving let out a desperate cry as Black Friday devoured its soul, but we barely noticed. It's hard to hear anything when you're wrestling 4,000 other people for buy one get one free cargo shorts at Old Navy.

Many of the big chain retailers will be opening during, or before, dinner time on Thanksgiving. Walmart, Kmart, Target, Best Buy, Kohl's -- all among the many electing to cannibalize Thanksgiving. Kmart will be open starting at 6 a.m. on Thanksgiving morning, offering great Black Friday deals for 41 straight hours. This is fortunate because I often walk into Kmart and think, "you know, the stuff in here just isn't cheap enough."

Will the Black Thanksgiving shopper carve a moment or two out of their busy bargain hunting schedule to break bread with their family and friends? Will they make it all the way through grace before dashing out the door, trading in tradition and merriment for cheap electronics and kitchen appliances? "Bless us, O Lord, and these thy gifts yada yada -- gotta go, Walmart opens in 10 minutes!"

I'm willing to bet that the hoarding hordes descending upon shopping malls and retail outlets at 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving, would, in a different context, likely speak quite solemnly about the dreaded "commercialization" of our national holidays.

Here's a true story: a few days ago I had a conversation with a friend where we both lamented about the meaning and message of our important holidays being lost in a commercialized haze. Yesterday, this same friend posted on his Facebook page, excitedly announcing Best Buy's earlier Thanksgiving opening time.

Yes, the man who hates the commercialization of holidays decided to become a commercial for the commercialization of holidays.

I admit, it's easy for me to forgo Black Thanksgiving. Stay home, eat food, and drink beer, or wait in long lines at dreary shopping malls, fighting with strangers over half priced Blu-Ray players? Not exactly a tough decision in my book. But even if I stumbled into some demented parallel dimension where the prospect of shuffling like a dead-eyed zombie through Target on Thanksgiving suddenly seemed appealing to me, I'd still pass. If for no other reason, this reason is reason enough: I'm not going to force some single mom to ring up my worthless purchases instead of enjoying Thanksgiving with her children.

These employees will be there, in their name tags and their vests, waiting on impatient mobs of customers while their families eat without them. They will be there with or without me. But I personally can't be among the reasons why they will be there. I understand profit margins and competition, but I think these places ought to respect their workers enough not to rip them away from their kids during one of America's most beloved holidays. And if I think that, I could not possibly go to one of these establishments and make them serve me.

Capitalism is great, but some things are greater. Family is greater. Yes, these folks choose to work at these stores. Yes, they likely knew when they signed up that they'd be sacrificing their Thanksgivings. Yes, at least they have jobs. Yes, sure, and so what? If that's enough in your mind to justify participating in the destruction of a great American tradition -- good for you. But you COULD wait until Friday, couldn't you? And if you did wait until Friday, and if everyone waited until Friday, no store would ever open on Thanksgiving again, right? So you COULD take steps to protect Thanksgiving from the decay of materialism and consumerism, and, while you're at it, give this wonderful holiday back to the customer service representatives who have been forced to abandon it and cater to the stampeding throngs, right?

Right, but then again, those skirts at JC Penney ARE super cheap.

Oh Lord, if you don't go on Thursday to buy stuff, there might be slightly less stuff available on Friday! Think of the stuff! We must get all the stuff! The stuff must be purchased!

Family can take a backseat.

Tradition can wait.

These employees should just be grateful for the opportunity to stand behind a cash register for 14 hours while the rest of us eat our pies and drink our wine.

Thanksgiving is just a holiday.

But stuff, things, toys, gadgets -- these are what life is all about.

Why give thanks for what you have when there's so much you don't have? That's the new meaning of Thanksgiving: count your blessings, and then buy some more blessings and count them again.


http://www.huffingtonpost...10109.html
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Posted by cj sampsel (+479) 8 years ago
Not to mention Walmart recently started food drives in some area for their own employees so they could enjoy the holidays!!!!!
Their reasoning saying it shows how much they care for their workers.
Why don't the cheap bastards let the employees that are really needy
load up a shopping cart for free?
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Posted by Jeri Dalbec (+3243) 8 years ago
Just have to mention one positive for WalMart...when they came to town, they hired people that could not seem to qualify anywhere else for whatever reason..gave them a start and I have seen several move up and on.

Also...in conjunction...our people are employed there and alternatives are not always so great..so, I think it is a tough call. It would be nice if the value of the employees could be recognized and rewarded and hopefully, the awareness will be helpful. Just would not like to see our workers suffer.
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Posted by K. D. (+362) 8 years ago
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Posted by Amorette F. Allison (+1917) 8 years ago
Saturday is Small Business Saturday. There are less of these than there used to be in Miles City but please try to shop what remains.
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Posted by KMuscha (+136) 8 years ago
Well I should have known better than to mention I might shop at Walmart on Thanksgiving. I am going to let myself believe that the posts aren't personal attacks since you don't know me, my family, or anything about my traditions. I am not going to join the Walmart bashing because I really do think there are two sides to the argument, and I tend to agree with points from both. Whether you choose to shop tomorrow or not, I wish everyone a nice Thanksgiving. I hope anyone who has to work all of part of the day in ANY store will get a chance to spend some quality time at home as well.

[This message has been edited by KMuscha (11/27/2013)]
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Posted by nativemc (+913) 8 years ago
I agree that there should be no stores open on Thanksgiving but, Walmart wont be the only one. I think one of the reasons there is bashing going on here is that Walmart is the only big box store in MC. I doubt there will be any cashiers there for 14 hours at a time. Most of the time that is the problem, Walmart doesnt give a lot of hours. Most people are part tme. As for Black Friday, I wont go to any stores on Thanksgiving. I have watched some of the people that do attend and I wont fight that. I also dont believe in shopping on Thanksgiving or Christmas. I agree with the fact that a lot of people that could not find work elsewhere, were given a chance at Walmart and have been successful in life. Too bad the big box stores dont recognize that the employees are the back bone of the stores, and should be rewarded for that.
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Posted by Raoul Childs (+70) 8 years ago
Wal-mart doesn't care about the people except for as slave labor. Wal-mart doesn't pay taxes. Wal-mart pays it's employees dirt. Barely slave wages. Look it up. The fact is that the family that owns Wal-mart all billionaires. Yet, the employees can't even afford the holidays.

They say they are helping people by food drives. Why not pay them enough to buy their own food.

I used to work there and know the ins and outs of their policy and practices.
Wal-mart and all the big corporations in America use people and spits out whats left. And none of them pay taxes. Yet, all their employees have to.

These places are really helpful, aren't they?
Well, at least the rich get richer and that makes everything o.k.
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Posted by Ben Dover (+113) 8 years ago
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Posted by Michael LaFayette (+77) 8 years ago
yeah this is a joke with their "in stock for 1 hour" crap.. most all them items require you to get a braclet to beable to get the ones in store. they advertise "6pm starts" yet i showed up about 35 mins early, and guess what they gave all the braclets away at 4pm. so i had to sit in line for almost a hour and a half just to get a "gift card" to go on line to put in a card activation number to spend the "gift card" on that paticular item at the "in stock" item.
what pissed me off the most was they advertise it starting at 6pm or 8am, yet they give all the braclets away hours before the advertised start time. I was not made in any way shape or form at the employees, but the corporation itself for this advertising lie. This is pretty much the first time I have ever went to a store for the "black friday" sales stuff. Worst expierence ever. oh and if you plan on getting a few groceries, good luck they got most all the grocery isles blocked off to hold their 30-50 of instore items they advertise for their "1 hour in stock guarantee" such a joke, I will just continue to skip the black friday sales, or stick to buying online.
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Posted by neonfreedom (+290) 8 years ago
You should not base everything off of one bad experience, yes I agree is crap they gave them out early,and did not do what they advertised,but that does not mean that everysingle black Friday from here on out will be a bad experience! I wished it would have been a better experience for you and hope you'll try next year!
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr. (+14950) 8 years ago
This is sick. WTF is wrong with this country. Why are people so procreateing greedy?
http://blackfridaydeathcount.com/
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Posted by cj sampsel (+479) 8 years ago
I'm an atheist but it's because Santa Claus killed Jesus.
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Posted by Forsyth Mike (+475) 8 years ago
I don't shop on Thanksgiving either but the whole furor over "depriving people of having a holiday" is dopey. It's as if these people never get any time off...which we all know they do.

I know lots of people who work on holidays. I, myself, am one of them -- I own a movie theatre which is open on holidays. What we do is, we move the holiday celebration to when we have time off. The move might be to a different day, or maybe just to a different time of day. Boom, problem solved.

[This message has been edited by Forsyth Mike (11/29/2013)]
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Posted by Elizabeth Emilsson (+797) 8 years ago
In my day the only places open on Thanksgiving were the Mom and Pop grocery stores. My mother always sent me there to buy milk or bread to get me out of the house while she finished cooking dinner.
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Posted by Amorette F. Allison (+1917) 8 years ago
I worked at the Montana Theater on Thanksgiving. We all saved our pie for after the show. My mother used to have a Christmas EVE party because my father was low man at the VA and worked Christmas. Of course there are essential employees who must work on the holiday but some of these companies could be closed on Thanksgiving. Or, at the very least, let it be volunteer scheduling. We used to work holiday shifts when we were in retail to give other folks who had families have the day off.

I didn't buy the CEO of Wally World claiming employees like working holidays. Trust me. They don't like it but they have to to keep their jobs.
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Posted by Union Hall (+58) 8 years ago
Any trouble at the local Wal-Mart on these two days? I have heard some crazy stories from other towns.
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