Advice Needed on Modular Homes
Posted by Larry Brence (+128) 10 years ago
Last year, we bought a piece of ground out in the valley in the neighborhood of the Cenex Seed Plant and are beginning the process of either building or moving in a house so we can live out there. We are strongly considering going with a modular. We have looked a little bit, but have made no decisions. The quality on the upper end seems to be pretty good, but I would like to hear from some other folks about their experiences.

Any one have any thoughts, recommendations, or words of advice about manufacturers and/or dealers as we begin this process.

[This message has been edited by Larry Brence (1/14/2012)]
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Posted by atomicg (+1014) 10 years ago
Sometimes the financing is different (and less in your favor) than a stick built home. Be sure you're not losing valuable interest that could be going towards a stick built structure.
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Posted by howdy (+4952) 10 years ago
consult a credit union perhaps about their mortgages and why the stick built vs modular makes a difference...I recommend Todd Gillette as extremely knowledgable...He is with the Community Federal Credit Union on Main Street...remember that modular and manufactured homes are completely different in how they are built and the banks take that into consideration...also the foundation is extremely important...If you place a manufactured home on a properly poured foundation it can be considered a stick built...depends on the appraiser in the county...consult their office as well...also depends on how they are attached to said foundation...Good luck with your project...
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Posted by Kacey (+3155) 10 years ago
Depends on your needs. A modular home is built in such a way that when you reach the stage where you need updating or remodeling it becomes almost impossible. After less than 20 years my mom's home has curling finish on her kitchen cabinet doors, floors that are stained beyond repair just from wear, wallpaper everywhere that has faded into oblivion but can't be torn down without pulling down all the cheap trim pieces, and on and on. If you are on a limited budget and plan on not staying a long time it will be ok but your resale is not going to be anywhere near what a stick built home would be.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+12085) 10 years ago
Check your zoning. The zoning out there is seriously wonky. Nobody in Miles City cares but the banks do big time.
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Posted by SZ (+152) 10 years ago
you're going to get more house for your buck square footage wise going modular, but you will regret doing it in the future versus a stick built home. You might get one with 2x6 exterior walls, but more often than not, interior walls are 2x3 and I have seen many that are 1x3 or 1x4 framing. That's how cost are cut. And try to remodel in the future, good luck, modulars and mobiles have different door sizes, different plumbing configurations, etc. My strong advice would be to go stick built, and get a reputable builder! I've been in construction/remodeling for a long time, but that's just my take.
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Posted by howdy (+4952) 10 years ago
a lot of the newer modular homes now come with real drywall etc and they are made much better than in other years...they seem to hold their value very well, I have found...if you have a proper foundation...I put a proper foundation on a double wide and the assessor notified me that I was off the list of manufactured homes as I had met all the requirements for a stick built one...he was as shocked as I was LOL...
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Posted by Wendy Branum (+53) 10 years ago
I work at Security Abstract and here are a couple things you need to keep in mind for modular v manufactured. A modular doesn't have a title, the frame is completly different (and no wheels) and will be taxed as real property, like a stick built. Manufactured, however, has some hoops to jump through. In order to get a 2ndary market loan, your bank will require our office to "insure" that all the proper steps have been taken for your home to be taxed as "real property." The main reason for this is for foreclosure. Your foundation must meet the requirements of the Assessor/Appraisers office. You can call me at the office (234-3415) and i can go over all the steps with you. It would give you a bit more info to make your decision. Way too many things to type in here.
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Posted by Larry Brence (+128) 10 years ago
Thanks everyone so far for the great advice. Certainly some things I will need to consider as I move this forward.

I was also hoping to hear from some folks and their experiences with the various manufacturers and dealers out there.
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Posted by howdy (+4952) 10 years ago
I know that many "brands" are made for the weather of the particular state you live in...For instance, 6 inch walls for Montana which is very needed in the winter to save on heating plus low E glass with gas in between panes to save on heat as well...just make sure yours is suited for where you live...Our new one certainly is and is very inexpensive to heat as well...Not sure of the brand but the model name was "Yellowstone" and we purchased it from Montana Modular Homes in Billings...It is almost 1800 sq ft and costs us about 800 per year to heat which is considerably less than last one we lived in...Hope that helps...
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Posted by Dave G. (+30) 10 years ago
Got my modular home 2 years ago and love it. Talk to Gary Benner at Majestic Homes in Billings 1-800-349-0229. They sell homes built by Schult. http://www.majestichomessite.com/ http://www.schulthomes.com/
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