Major Nathan Borchardt
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11432) 9 years ago
I am spending part of my lazy Thanksgiving afternoon transcribing the handwritten memoir of Major Nathan Borchardt, one of the Founding Father of Miles City. He has just been rescued from Fort Pease and taken back to Fort Ellis. I am taking a break because my eyesight and his handwriting are struggling.

Just a plug to those of you who have never bothered to write down your life history. Do it. Seriously. What he was doing probably seemed ordinary to him at the time. Fortunately, someone convinced him to write it down at some point. Pity no one had a typewriter handy.

25 pages to go.

Happy Thanksgiving
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Posted by Maryann McDaniel (+254) 9 years ago
Although I do not always agree with your political views, I very much appreciate your efforts to preserve the history of Miles City. I used to work for Miles City Star as a reporter from about 1965-1969. There was so much living history being sent by the outlying columnists. Great job -- with a manual typewriter!

Later (1970-1975) I worked for the company that owned the Dallas Morning News...very computer saavy ... we used an IBM typewriter which was then scanned into a huge, I mean huge, computer.

In the 1980s I had to turn my stories in on a floppy disc in a format compatible to Mac when I was an editor of lifestyle magazine in Houston, TX.

It has been an interesting journey.

The changes in journalism alone are worth a chapter or two....

Keep up the research and writing about Miles City.
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Posted by Kenny Vail (+121) 9 years ago
Dear Amorette,
Would you please let me know if Borchardt had anything to say about the early day gamblers?
KV
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11432) 9 years ago
I'm just coming up on his time with Terry and Borchardt's take on the Battle of the Little Big Horn. I know he admired Custer. It is hand written and slow going.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr. (+14673) 9 years ago
Amorette: I am curious if you have ever encountered this story; A couple of days after Custer's battle there was a steamboat (maybe the Far West?) that came up the Yellowstone and started up the Big Horn. Apparently, when they arrived the soldiers on the boat saw a huge indian camp and thought they were going to be attacked. Supposedly, there was a bunch of bars of gold on the boat and the soldiers packed the gold off the boat and buried it in Pease draw which is just to the southeast of the mouth of the Big Horn river.

The person that told me this story claimed that it was in some document in the Library of Congress. Any ideas about this?
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9741) 9 years ago
>> Just a plug to those of you who have never bothered to write down your life history. Do it.

Historians of the next generation will come to milescity.com for source materials. Just think of the local history they'll be able to pull together from the posts here. Talk about your primary source material.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11432) 9 years ago
This is cool but weird. Hearing a first person account of the guy who provided "refreshments" to Reno's men. I wonder if anyone else ever did look this through this before. Surely I'm not the first person to read it. Although with the Major's spelling and handwriting, maybe I am. He did go through and do some edits but it could use a few more.
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