To the Asshat on Roosevelt
Posted by Jade S (+150) 10 years ago
To the man who watered his yard while my son had a seizure in the street ,in front of his house, and offered no help: Thanks, Asshat. He came out of the seizure just fine, except for the broken elbow and the headache . Good thing his younger sister was there to keep his head from further hitting the pavement as he became tonic-clonic.

She looked to you for help (remember she had those other young kids with her, too?) and you did nothing.

When she arrived home and asked, "What kind of person doesn't help a kid who is clearly having a seizure in the street?". I replied, "Maybe because we're not from Miles City."

Jerk.
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Posted by Frank Hardy (+1539) 10 years ago
That's why God gave us eggs and toilet paper.


FH
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Posted by Dustin Lynam (+186) 10 years ago
wow.. what has happened to people. Thats terrible
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Posted by howdy (+4953) 10 years ago
that kind of matches the cheering for the idea to let a hurt man die, if he has no insurance, at the tea party debate last week...People are so noncaring it is unbelieveable...Hope your son is OK, particularly since I too have a seizure disorder...This child could have easily died, you jerk, whoever you are...
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Posted by Kacey (+3156) 10 years ago
I sometimes wonder if there wasn't a bit of inbreeding in Miles City....I can't understand people's stupidity otherwise!

I am sorry for you and your son. Thank God for his sister! That is the person I would turn in to DFS. They should keep an eye on him if he is that anti-child.
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Posted by Jade S (+150) 10 years ago
Frank,
I wouldn't waste good food and TP on that guy. In my angrier moments, I was envisioning going over his yard with a five gallon bucket of Round-Up and a spray nozzle.

The last time he had a seizure of this type, six years ago, it triggered a stroke. This time, thankfully, was much shorter in duration during the tonic-clonic phase and there was no sustained neurological damage. After a few minutes, he was able to get up and walk the few blocks home. Last time, he left in an ambulance. Seizures are no joke.

I was completely at a loss during the applause at the debate during that, and even more as that kind of thinking hit my door with my children.

I told my kids (from 16-4) that when it happens again to yell for help. Someone will hear and will hopefully be different than the half-sack who stood like a deer in the headlights.
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Posted by Patty O. (+217) 10 years ago
Good luck with yelling for help! Not to sound insensitive, but this same thing happened to a friends of ours. Their child had a seizure also in the street, and she yelled (screamed) for help. Their neighbor had the nerve to walk over look at their child and say "it's only a seizure, he'll be fine" and walk away.
I don't know what it is with people and why they don't at least stop and call for help. There is something clearly wrong with an individual who can stand by and watch someone either yelling for help or injured and just go about their own business. What happened to reaching out and helping someone in need.
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Posted by cubby (+2624) 10 years ago
I know for sure that in my neighborhood for a 2 block radius that anyone that was home and heard a cry for help from someones child would help no matter what the problem was. That sucks that people are that unfriendly around our town.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6174) 10 years ago
Jade, that's not a very good welcome for your family. I'm sorry that happened to you. Perhaps you should have a good talk with him (with your uniformed husband in tow).
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Posted by Jade S (+150) 10 years ago
If I bring my live-in retired Marine lawman, does that mean I can't grease his yard with Round-Up?

And frankly, I won't let the actions of one jerk overshadow the amount of kindness we have received by most of the people here.
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Posted by Bob Netherton II (+1902) 10 years ago
"That's why God gave us eggs and toilet paper."

That's terrible, Frank! Egging and TPing some kid's house because he has a seizure disorder.
Oh!
Wait!
I get it. Never mind.
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Posted by SeptyTwo (+669) 10 years ago
Good to know the boy is ok... and too bad the man didn't help..

but...

The comments in this thread lead me to think that since the man did not help, that he alone would be abandoned in case HE needed help in some way?

I mean, understanding the top post is somewhat of a vent, and yes I agree that he should have done something if he was able, but it seems like that if that particular person himself needed help in some way, he would not get it because of his actions/non actions.

There is a word for that, or several.

Calamity strikes, everyone gets to safety, but someone notices that guy is stuck at his home as disaster looms.. Someone remembers that he didn't help before, so the group mentality is "F*** him, he ain't worth it!"

?? that sound about right?

Talk and words like in the posts above reflect a dangerous mentality, but i hope it is just words and not how it will be.

just sayin'
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Posted by Jade S (+150) 10 years ago
Septy,

I would help him, or anyone for that matter, because that is what I expect out of myself as a human. However, he would have to forgive me for spraying his yard with Round-Up.

I didn't expect him to rescue my kid, or perform some miracle. I did expect him to be a responsible, caring adult, who assisted a 15 year old girl, surrounded by smaller children (4,6,8,10), while she was occupied with the 16 year old who was flopping on the floor like a fish. Instead, while holding her brother's head, she instructed the smaller kids to remain calm and still, reassuring them that he would be ok, while talking to me on the phone .

In his defense, perhaps he was so impressed with her poise and command of the situation that he thought himself helpless. I guess I can stomach that better than apathy.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr. (+14936) 10 years ago
I am sorry that this happened to your son. I know it is stressful. That said, I am curious how you would have felt if he attempted to help, but actually made the situation worse? Perhaps it is best to simply count your blessings rather than using roundup on his grass (I would use paraquat and diesel fuel myself ).
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Posted by Chris Gamrath (+383) 10 years ago
I would also add that I'm wondering if your neighbor IS from the area of Miles City, or he too moved in from somewhere else. I would still like to think, that "small town mentality" would kick in for any local (or decent person) and would immediatly come to help aid in any way they possibly could. It's a sad, double edged sword in the fact that we need to bring in jobs and resources from anywhere and everywhere to help keep our small town going, but with this comes people with different ways of thinking then what we've become accoustomed to over the years.

Again, one would think that seeing a child in the street (0r anyhwere) experiencing any sort of serious problem, would cause human compassion to immediatly kick in and come to their aid, but it's just not the case anymore. That's a sad thing to say but I believe it to be true for everywhere, not just our small town

I'm thankful to read your child is ok, and hope that you still believe in Miles City and it's citizens, knowing that that type of responce is NOT the norm.
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Posted by David Schott (+16853) 10 years ago
Maybe the neighbor genuinely thought your kids were just goofing around. Maybe he was grooving to Britney Spears' "I Wanna Go" on his iPod Nano and didn't even hear your kids' cries for help. Maybe he's a registered sex offender and isn't allowed to have contact with children. Maybe he's a doctor and knows that his office doesn't accept your medical insurance...

So many possibilities besides "he knows we're not originally from Miles City so he wants my child to die in the street."
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Posted by Grim Reaper (+68) 10 years ago
I think you should consider the fact that the man may have not known that he was having a seizure. I would not start jumping to conclusions on the word of a small child. Best of luck to you and your family.
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Posted by Kacey (+3156) 10 years ago
There is no excuse for this man's behavior. IF he was a sex offender, he could have still gotten a phone and called for help without getting any closer. If he was a doctor he was REQUIRED to help no matter what.

Why would he think the kids were just messing around while hearing screams for help?

There is NO EXCUSE for his lack of assistance.
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Posted by David Schott (+16853) 10 years ago
Were you there, Kacey? Do you know the "neighbor"? Was "Jade S" there to witness it? Is "Jade S" giving a firsthand account of what happened?

As far as I can tell we only have one side of the story but you have already made up your mind about what a rotten xenophobe this "neighbor" is. Nice.
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Posted by Jade S (+150) 10 years ago
David,
No, I wasn't there, unless you count being on the other end of the telephone. I do, however, have complete confidence in my daughter's account of the events. She has no reason to fabricate a story. Although I was angry and having delusions of grandeur with regard to ruining the yard that appeared more important to him , the fact is that he has already been forgiven by this house.
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Posted by Grim Reaper (+68) 10 years ago
I guess instead of slandering this guy with no actual facts, you could go to his house and ask him why he didn't help out. Maybe you would find the real answer why he didn't do anything.
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Posted by Josh Rath (+2303) 10 years ago
My 2 cents.

When did it become the responsibility of your neighbors to watch your children? That is YOUR job. And if you are too lazy to do it, you shouldn't of taken on the job of having kids in the first place.

Quit bitching.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6174) 10 years ago
Gee, Josh. Your home isn't on Roosevelt, is it?
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Posted by Josh Rath (+2303) 10 years ago
Nope, but I'm tired of people using MilesCity.com as their personal, anonymous, bitchfest.
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Posted by Jade S (+150) 10 years ago
My rant was hardly anonymous, as Jade is my name, and my older children were taking a group of younger neighborhood children to the park; only one of which, was mine. My concern was not with the lack of home-training with the children, but the apparent lack of such in an adult.
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Posted by Chris Gamrath (+383) 10 years ago
Nobody said that their kids needed "watched" Josh, the idea behind the post was wondering why someone wouldn't help a kid in what "sounds" like an obvious time of distress. To follow everyone else's logic, why COULDN'T said neighbor at least asked "hey do you kids need help?!?" or "What's going on?" or anything else that would have opened a line of communication to verify what the situation was??
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Posted by Levi Forman (+3709) 10 years ago
Their neighbor had the nerve to walk over look at their child and say "it's only a seizure, he'll be fine" and walk away.


Maybe they had a relative with epilepsy. My sister is epileptic and she has gotten stuck with the bill for multiple unnecessary ambulance rides thanks to well-meaning people who saw her have a seizure and called 911.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr. (+14936) 10 years ago
Levi beat me to it. I am required to have MHSA safety training as a part of my job. In that training, the first thing you are taught to do is activate the emergency response system and get an ambulance coming to the scene. Had I encountered this situation you would have an ambulance bill. How do you feel about that?

I one time had an employee who was sitting in a chair talking to me when he took a head dive and went into a seizure. I did what I could do to keep him from hurting himself. When the seizure was over I got him to the ER. He was pissed at me helping because of the ER bill and quit shortly there after.

While I would jump in and help out, I can understand other peoples reluctance to get involved.
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Posted by Jade S (+150) 10 years ago
Richard et all,

I would have gladly paid the bill, as the last time my son was in this situation he suffered a stroke. I get the anger and frustration if you have a bill for something that you deem as a regular part of the life of an epileptic. I also am fully aware that this man could not have known that it would have been ok with me either way. I received the ER bill anyway, as he broke his elbow in the fall.

My anger, and subsequent rant, was due to what I perceived as his apathy. This wasn't a small child coming home and telling mommy about the mean man. This was a highly independent, responsible 15 year old (who runs her own judo dojo) who looked to this person for assistance and was ignored. Of course he couldn't have been aware of that, but it explains why I have full confidence in her account. There are many scenarios to explain why he didn't at least come over and make sure everyone was alright, or direct a little traffic since they were the road. He fell off the curb and they ended up in a crowd around him in the road.

The "not from Miles City" comment was given tongue-in-cheek, as our other neighbor had told us upon moving in that our welcome might be lukewarm due to my appearance, my husband's occupation, and because we aren't from around here.
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Posted by Sheri Cain (+41) 10 years ago
Jade I am sorry for what happened.

Josh-I am appauled you would say that. Do you have children? Do you watch them 100% of the time? I think Jade is a responsible mom and I don't think she would leave a young child at home without having someone watch him which makes be believe the child was older. The phrase "If you don't have something nice to say then don't say anything at all." comes to mind.

Just an advise Jade. I would go to your neighbor and tell him what happened and suggest if he sees your son with another seizure to call for help. Maybe he didn't know. I'm not sure but then go to other neighbors around your home to advise them also if they see something. The more the better in case it happens again.

I hope this helps. Good luck and thank you to the angel that was looking over him that day...
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Posted by Josh Rath (+2303) 10 years ago
Sheri, I'm 19. And no, I don't have children. However, when I am around my half brother and sister I watch them closely. Mainly because I know they can and most likely will get into trouble and/or get hurt without someone watching.

I still stand by my post.
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Posted by Jade S (+150) 10 years ago
I am not offended by Josh's opinion. Mainly, because it doesn't apply to this situation, or to me. I am pretty protective over my half-brother, too; so much so, that I adopted him. Thankfully, I have raised his younger siblings to be pretty protective over him, too.
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Posted by Emilie Boyles (+254) 10 years ago
We are about six weeks away from National Epilepsy Awareness Month, however it seems this is a good time for some early reminders.

For accurate information about seizures, visit http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org.
For the general public, this page is particularly useful: http://www.epilepsyfounda...lved/neam/

For Jade and others who have children or grandchildren with epilepsy or seizure disorders or those adults in eastern Montana looking for ways to stay independent and grow into independence, there is no Montana or North Dakota Epilepsy Foundation chapter, however the Epilepsy Foundation has great supports, information, and forums online.

Last year I wrote a column about living with epilepsy on the frontier. It maybe helpful to for those who have not experienced the stigma of having a seizure. It also includes some first aid information from the Epilepsy Foundation. It can be found here:
http://www.examiner.com/e...r-my-story

Finally, here are two images from the Epilepsy Foundation that can be printed out and posted in your home or business (each addresses a different kind of first aid for different types of seizures - I used the i-m-g tags, but couldn't get them to appear correctly)):
http://imageshack.us/phot...558830.jpg
http://imageshack.us/phot...502757.jpg

As we all age, remember it is not a matter of IF someone has a disability, it's a matter of WHEN.
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Posted by howdy (+4953) 10 years ago





[This message has been edited by howdy (9/19/2011)]
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Posted by Emilie Boyles (+254) 10 years ago
Thanks Howdy!
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Posted by howdy (+4953) 10 years ago
anytime, Emily...
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Posted by Sheri Cain (+41) 10 years ago
Thanks Howdy.
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Posted by Patty O. (+217) 10 years ago
Had I encountered this situation you would have an ambulance bill. How do you feel about that?

How would I feel about that? Let's see, for the safety of my own child I would gladly pay for any medical bills, ambulance rides etc. Money is not important to the life of your child or family member.

Why would you even question that?
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Posted by Bridgier (+9125) 10 years ago
Patty, did you read ALL of Richard's statement, or just the first sentence?
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Posted by Jade S (+150) 10 years ago
Patty,

Although I happen to agree with your viewpoint, I think Richard's question was quite valid. I don't think he was saying not to call, but for someone who has a health problem that leaves them somewhat temporarily incapacitated, and at the mercy of others, it gets expensive. As stated in the 'what to do if someone has a seizure' posters (thanks, by the way, those are pretty cool) most seizures do not require an ambulance and ER visit. So for someone who keeps racking up unnecessary medical bills due to well meaning folks, I can see where it can be an issue, especially for someone uninsured or someone with high cost shares (like me).
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Posted by JessicaLee (+153) 9 years ago
Jade, as a mother myself, I understand completely why you feel the way that you do but unfortunately with the world being what it is I do have to put in that more and more people are becoming afraid of helping others in many different situations because we are constantly hearing of people being sued or charges being pressed against someone who honestly believed they were trying to help or doing the right thing....I truely hope that there is some valid reason behind him doing nothing because I know if it were me I would do anything I possibly could for anyone I ran into that may be in some sort of trouble or a accident or something like your situation. But that also has to do with the way I was raised. I agree with some of the other comments, if it were me in your position I probably couldnt help myself from going and knocking on his door and asking why?????? I am sorry this happened and Im sorry that people like him give this town a bad name. This community is known for the way they pull together and support eachother so its very sad. I hope your experiences here get better, not a great welcome for you and your family.
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Posted by Skidoorulz (+52) 9 years ago
Jade, why don't you go over to this guys house, introduce yourself, explain your child's situation, ask the man if he saw what was going on? Ask him why he did not help. Instead of calling him an asshat. There are a few on here with some common sense, others just seem to talk out their, well you get the point. There may be a very good and explainable reason he did not help. I always say if you want the facts go to the horses mouth, not the other end! Go ask!!! One more thing, Roundup may very likely get you thrown in jail so don't take any with you. Vandalism is against the law, not helping someone isn't.
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Posted by mikeh (+299) 9 years ago
Not that it excuses the behavior of your neighbor...but the first Winter I was here, I took a tumble on the ice. I was sure nobody would hear me if I asked for help (luckily I didn't need it after a minute or so). The guy accross the street (600 block of N Sewell) heard the thump of my fall from inside his house and came over to check on me. Pretty cool. Thank God not everyone here is an asshat.
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