GOP Welfare Queens
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11731) 10 years ago
The Lege sends back Fed dollars aimed at helping the poor but when it comes to helping themselves, let those Federal bucks roll in.

http://www.greatfallstrib...|Frontpage
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Posted by Bob Netherton II (+1903) 10 years ago
That's the GOP in a nutshell, Amorette.
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Posted by Levi Forman (+3711) 10 years ago
That's the GOP human race in a nutshell, Amorette.
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Posted by Jeri Dalbec (+3209) 10 years ago
Something I found interesting. If you go to FedSpending.org and ewg.org/farms...check out Custer County or any other county in Montana, you will see the amount of money that helps to keep Montana functioning. You have to wonder what our counties will look like should they withdraw the Federal funds. The "Free Market" really seems designed for Corporations, of them, by them and for them and I am trying to visualize how they will be a fit in our community.

I have a question and would like help in understanding HB 354 which lifts the prohibition on carrying concealed weapons in bars, churches and banks. Why is it necessary? Thanks for any input.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17230) 10 years ago
I have a question and would like help in understanding HB 354 which lifts the prohibition on carrying concealed weapons in bars, churches and banks. Why is it necessary? Thanks for any input.


Because you never know if the guy drinking beer next to you in the tavern is a Muslim terrorist.
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Posted by Bill Freese (+478) 10 years ago
HB 354 is the one which makes it OK for landlords to stop installing carbon monoxide detectors. HB 384 is the one which makes it OK to carry concealed weapons into bars, churches and banks. It is all about the Republican push for public safety.
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Posted by Jeri Dalbec (+3209) 10 years ago
Are you being facetious or is it really about paranoia?
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Posted by Jeri Dalbec (+3209) 10 years ago
Sorry....I meant HB 384.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17230) 10 years ago
It really is about paranoia.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6175) 10 years ago
HB 354 is the one which makes it OK for landlords to stop installing carbon monoxide detectors.


I can't wait for the first wrongful death lawsuit.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11731) 10 years ago
Poor people rent. The Repugnicans whole goal is to starve or otherwise murder the poor to get them to stop requesting services. Who will provide their cheap labor after everyone is dead is something they don't seem to have figured out.
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Posted by Jeri Dalbec (+3209) 10 years ago
Is there a lot more to "it" than just buying the little appliance that plugs into the wall?

I am still trying to put a perspective on the need to arm oneself to go to a bar, the church or a bank.
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Posted by Bridgier (+9178) 10 years ago
Isn't "don't bring your guns to town" part of the Code of the West?
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Posted by Jeri Dalbec (+3209) 10 years ago
Oh...I do remember, "Don't bring your guns to town, son"! "Leave your guns at home." Must be part of the CODE! Good thinking.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6175) 10 years ago
You guys are confusing guns with carbon monoxide detectors. It's "Don't bring your carbon monoxide detectors to town." Guns are just fine. After all guns don't kill people and neither does carbon monoxide.
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Posted by Jeri Dalbec (+3209) 10 years ago
It was interesting getting to the bottom of it anyway. Enjoy the information. Thank you.
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Posted by Leif Ronning (+74) 10 years ago
Despite what the republican majority would like you to believe I refuse to accept that the majority of Montanas do not care about the old, the poor, and the schools. These clowns are turning away millions of dollars in federal funding just to save a few state dollars. They are gutting or doing away with any program that does not benefit the rich. This legisative session is going to go down in history as one of the dummest and most damaging we have ever seen in our lifetime. I just hope the voters remember this in the next election and not send this bunch of idiots back to Helena. Leif
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6175) 10 years ago
I refuse to accept that the majority of Montanas[sic] do not care about the old, the poor, and the schools.



I totally agree. The problem is voter laziness and/or apathy. Too many folks don't bother to vote and many that do don't bother to really learn about the candidates' positions. Here in the state with the highest sheeple population (Utah) most folks just hit the button to vote the Republican ticket without even looking at the individual candidates. It disgusts me. Until people wake up and realize that they can make a difference if they arm themselves with knowledge we are doomed to elect dumber and dumber politicians who pander to our emotions instead of our intellects.
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Posted by howdy (+4942) 10 years ago
I am always amazed by the people that truly believe that their votes don't really make a difference so why bother...what ignorance!!
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Posted by Jeri Dalbec (+3209) 10 years ago
WEALTHFARE - Corporate welfare is a pejorative term describing a government's bestowal of money grants, tax breaks, or other special favorable treatment on corporations or selected corporations. The term compares corporate subsidies and welfare payments to the poor, and implies that corporations are much less needy of such treatment than the poor. Ralph Nader, a prominent critic of corporate welfare, is often credited with coining the term.
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Posted by Rick Kuchynka (+4462) 10 years ago
It's kinda unfair to say that when the government chooses to widely subsidize an industry that anyone in that industry must march lockstep with the idea that all government intervention is a good idea.

Farm subsidies keep food prices artificially low, which is a policy decision. Setting aside whether there's anything inherently wrong with that decision... once the subsidies are there, they are no longer optional to your average farmer. It doesn't matter whether they agree with them or not.

But if accepting government funding means you're no longer allowed to question the scope and size of government, I'd say that's the best argument I've ever heard for defunding NPR.

By your logic, once they're on the dole, they're not even allowed to talk about financially-conservative issues.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11731) 10 years ago
once they're on the dole, they're not even allowed to talk about financially-conservative issues.


Exactly. Unless they start in their own pocket, then they should keep their mouths shut. I don't hear any of these guys speaking up about the evils of farm subsidies since it subsidizes them. But food stamps. . . oh, those blasted poor people, wanting to eat.

Sorry, but unless you start with yourself, you have no business trying to cut off others.
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Posted by Maryann McDaniel (+260) 10 years ago
I have not been paying attention and have been away for a while. Does Montana's legislature meet every year...or every two years...like our (fill in the blanks) every two years? Just wondering if you are facing annual affliction, agitation, and harm every year or only every two year like us here in Texas? It sucks! We never know as an educator at the district level if we have to jump through higher hoops, attend additional trainings ourselves (first responders in times of emergency like hurricanes, terrorist attacks), provide additional trainings to our teachers (bullying, drug testing for athletes, date rape, firearm detection, etc.), when our school year starts, what is required for graduation (health and computer skills were knocked out two years ago), etc. etc. AND IF THE STATE IS GONNA FUND MANDATES! Stay the course, mates!
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Posted by Rick Kuchynka (+4462) 10 years ago
Yeah yeah. And people complaining about corporations should never work for one... people who complain about free trade with China shouldn't own a computer... people who hate big oil should walk to work... etc etc
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17230) 10 years ago
.....people who defend Republicans shouldn't have changing the subject as their only recourse....yada yada yada...
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+9888) 10 years ago


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Posted by Stone (+1595) 10 years ago
Rick, ya and people that hate unions should work seven days a week with no over time. Enjoy your life.
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Posted by Rick Kuchynka (+4462) 10 years ago
Rick, ya and people that hate unions Henry Ford should work seven days a week with no over time. Enjoy your life.


There, that's better.

And I don't think in Christian countries, 7 days was ever the norm. So as soon as I hear progressives thanking God for Sunday, we'll talk about thanking unions (partially) for Saturday.
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Posted by Rick Kuchynka (+4462) 10 years ago
Maryann, our legislature meets every two years. Which is good and bad I guess. Bad... all the issues on the table get pretty rushed treatment. 90 days every two years (unless it goes to OT) Each legislator really only gets one crack at an issue before they have to go through reelection again.

The good... imagine what the legislature could screw up with more time on their hands
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11731) 10 years ago
Actually, seven days a week was not uncommon in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Neither were 14 to 20 hour workdays. The idea that Sunday was a day of rest for the poor and working class was part of the Victorian reform movement of the late nineteenth century that began to suggest children as young as seven shouldn't be working 12 hour days in the mines.
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Posted by Rick Kuchynka (+4462) 10 years ago
In most industrial jobs (aka union-type jobs) the work week was pretty uniformly 6 days from the beginning. Yes there were exceptions, just as there are today. I'm sure agrarian workers were different but then again most of them probably still work 7 days a week... nature of the business. And unions were never a factor there anyway.

But even when Ford voluntarily implemented his 5-day work week, he was changing it from six, because that was the industry standard at the time. And that was all pre-UAW.

In fact, many states restricted what kind of business could be conducted on Sunday... in order to encourage keeping the Sabbath. Thomas Jefferson helped write such a law in Virginia, just so you know how far back it goes.

[This message has been edited by Rick Kuchynka (3/26/2011)]
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11731) 10 years ago
You aren't going far enough back in history. Ford was a latecomer to the industrial revolution. Check out working conditions in the eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Seven days a week for industrial workers, service workers, servants, etc. were very common.
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Posted by Stone (+1595) 10 years ago
Friday marked the 100th Anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist fire, a workplace disaster that cost 146 people their lives and launched the modern labor movement. The same hard fought rights workers earned over the last century are under attack today. This edition of the Battleground Bulletin discusses why unions are as important in 2011 as they were in 1911.


As we celebrate Women's History Month 2011, we also approach the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist fire that took the lives of 146 people, mostly young women from Italian and Jewish immigrant families living in New York City. In the wake of this disaster in 1911, the people held mass demonstrations, politicians held hearings and citizens demanded new workplace safety laws to ensure that this kind of tragedy would never happen again.

And safety laws came to be, but so too did much more social progress. Both the burgeoning labor movement and the women's suffrage movement gained much needed momentum after 1911. In 1920, the 19th Amendment was passed giving women the right to vote. In 1935, FDR signed the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), granting collective bargaining rights to private sector workers. It is notable that the NLRA is named for Robert Wagner, who was President of the New York State Senate in 1911, and that the bill signing was witnessed by Secretary of Labor Francis Perkins, and that the bill signing was witnessed by Secretary of Labor Francis Perkins, who also witnessed the Triangle fire firsthand.

As governors and state legislators attack workers rights in 2011, they are trying to turn back the clock on 100 years of progress. As in 1911, women workers remain most vulnerable to these attacks, particularly in the public service.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6175) 10 years ago
And I don't think in Christian countries, 7 days was ever the norm. So as soon as I hear progressives thanking God for Sunday, we'll talk about thanking unions (partially) for Saturday.


Interesting. I believe that Saturday is the Jewish Sabbath and that the Muslims have Friday. Most religions have a day of rest, not just Christianity. The day before the Sabbath is often a work holiday as well in order to prepare for the Sabbath.
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Posted by Rick Kuchynka (+4462) 10 years ago
Pure Hyperbole, Stone. Let's look at this map.



You're equating the political process of one of these states possibly flipping from Blue to Red with forced child labor and 6 day x 14 hour sweatshopateering.

Absolute moral authority has a generational non-transfer clause. Otherwise, Democrats still belong to the party of Slavery.

Let's call this what it is. Politics.
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Posted by Rick Kuchynka (+4462) 10 years ago
Wendy, my statement wasn't intended to exclude other nations/religions. Was just pointing out the fact that a weekly day of rest was already a priority long before the US Labor movement.

That's not to say Labor didn't have a big impact on improving working conditions in many ways. I'll give credit where it's due. But let's not act like everyone would be working 7 days a week if it weren't for Labor Unions. That's gross exaggeration.
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Posted by Stone (+1595) 10 years ago
Rick, it is interesting how Nevada is a right to work for less state but almost all of Vegas is unionized.

[This message has been edited by Stone (3/27/2011)]
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Posted by Rick Kuchynka (+4462) 10 years ago
Hey, no argument there. Unions have a rich, rich history in Vegas

http://www.8newsnow.com/s...ected=true

From the mid-50s through the mid-70s, Jimmy Hoffa was a rock star of organized labor, as well known as Elvis or the Beatles. His rapid ascent through the ranks of the Teamsters union was made possible, in part, by friendships Hoffa forged with high-ranking organized crime figures across the country. They helped keep Hoffa in power. In return, he allowed the mob to use the Teamsters pension fund as its own bank....

All of those Teamster loans came with unwritten strings attached, namely, the mob was allowed to install its own casino employees who skimmed millions of dollars.

Like the rest of the country, Brandt is fascinated by the disappearance of Hoffa in 1975. But unlike everyone else, Brandt says he knows what happened on that fateful day. The man who killed Hoffa, he says, is former Teamster official Frank Sheerhan. He knows because Sheerhan told him, as detailed in the book, "I heard you paint houses."


But I'm thinking that might not sell the 'Unions just look out for the little guy' story quite like you'd hoped.
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Posted by Plowboy (+28) 10 years ago
Rick, ya and people that hate unions should work seven days a week with no over time. Enjoy your life.


I do I am the farmer/rancher that feeds you cheaply
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Posted by howdy (+4942) 10 years ago
the farmer/rancher that couldn't do without government subsidies for many crops, CRP, and government grazing rights...You have your own union, buddy, the tax payers just provide it for you... Same thing, just different name...so if you wish to cut the budget, start at home...
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Posted by Stone (+1595) 10 years ago
Ah, the old Hoffa line. I am glad to see your true knowledge of unions expanding. You never cease to amaze me.

I once saw a T-shirt that read- "The only difference between union members and liberals is that union member are well armed."

You can drag up stereotypical, racist, and antiquated visions of, the union boss, history if you want but instead you should look up the Ludlow Coal Massacre, Herrin, IL coal strike massacre, Hanapepe Massacre. If you would like to move the labor clock back to the 50's and beyond go for it. If Neo-Feudalism is to your liking- we will again see strike massacre's and safety violations like the Shirtwaist Factory fire. Wait we already have seen safety violations and death like that Massey Energy mine in West Virginia 2010.
What's next you going to show up at a union meeting and gun down women and children? All because Jimmy Hoffa was a no good crook.

Stock tip- Pinkerton
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Posted by Buck Showalter (+4459) 10 years ago
Weed = $200/ounce
Corn = $250/ton

It should insult the people that grow the world's food.
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Posted by Bob Netherton II (+1903) 10 years ago
Keep in mind, Buck - the people who grow weed aren't being paid by the government to NOT grow weed.
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Posted by Rick Kuchynka (+4462) 10 years ago
Hey, it's pretty hard to talk about Vegas as a big Union right-to-work success story without pointing out what exactly it is they succeeded at doing there.

Outside of that, the long-term links between organized crime and labor unions are undeniable. It's hard to find a crime family anywhere who didn't dabble in Union corruption. It's just part of the business.

I'm not saying labor unions = corruption. I'm just saying, as a demographic, Unions' hands aren't any cleaner than the people they sometimes accuse.
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Posted by Buck Showalter (+4459) 10 years ago
I've been on a desperate search to find these lazy fat cats and their vast unploughed lands, but it's nothing but potatoes and people who are way too dirty to be getting paid to do nothing. They must all live over in Miles City. They probably marry girls who buy t-bones with food stamps.
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Posted by Rick Kuchynka (+4462) 10 years ago
Interesting fact of the day

http://en.wikipedia.org/w...er_Chicago

The focus on illegal activities by unions proved so effective that the EA's main priority became attacking labor racketeering. The term "racketeering" was, in fact, coined by the Employers' Association of Chicago in June 1927 in a statement about the influence of organized crime in the Teamsters union. [12] Reports about rackets and other illegal activities by labor unions and employers were issued annually by the EA. In 1928, for example, the Employers' Association claimed that exactly 46 rackets were operating in Chicago. The EA reported on the use of thugs and gunmen by both unions and employers, and excoriated the public and government officials for not prosecuting rackets more often or more successfully.[13] EA reports also focused on bombings in the city. These reports provide statistical documentation of the level of organized crime-related violence in the city (although the EA reports rarely distinguish between union- or employer-instigated violence and violence undertaken by mob-dominated unions or employers). The Association's October 1928 report, which documented an astonishing 727 bombings in Chicago in the previous year, led to the formation of the city's first arson unit.[14]
In October 1928, Employers' Association president James W. Breen was linked to the rackets himself. Chicago police investigators alleged that Breen had helped form a battery makers' cartel, and that this trade group was shaking down non-members.


Sounds like we need to add the word 'racketeering' to the list of things we should thank Unions for. Unfortunately, that was way before Jimmy Hoffa's day.
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