Bad Eggs at Wally World
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11885) 11 years ago
The recall on those bad eggs now includes our local Wal-Mart.

I love the fact that the guy who owned these egg farms had been fined so often for so many things that they just automatically doubled his fines as a chronic offender. I have an idea! How about SHUTTING DOWN THE FARMS until they are no longer a threat.

And his friends saying, oh, he was such a hard worker and good Christian (natch!) and he really was trying to fix the problems. So, why were his farms sending out toxins left and right? Why was he fined for hiring illegals and sexual harassment? If he is such a fine example of American entrepreneurship, how come people are having bloody diarrhea from his products?
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Posted by j2r (+133) 11 years ago
Ugh...thanks for the heads up!!
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Posted by Tucker Bolton (+3708) 11 years ago
Amorette,

Have you seen "Food Inc" and/or "The Future of Food"? Both are available on netflix. These movies are informative documentaries that point out corporate influence on the food supply. A couple of salient points are how easy it is for our food supply to be contaminated and how ineffective, if not incompetent the USDA and the FDA are. They also address the greedy motives of GMO's and Monsanto as well as other corporate giants race to own as much of our food supply as possible.

Community sustainable agriculture, farm to table and ranch to table really make sense and good business. If you spend your food dollar at the corporate marketplace, regardless of what you eat, be it a tomato or a steak, it has traveled an average of fifteen hundred miles. A single hamburger purchased at McDonalds contains the beef from one thousand to fifteen hundred different cows.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6170) 11 years ago
Another reason not to frequent Walmart. I buy my eggs from a local organic farm.
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Posted by Stewart (+155) 11 years ago
Ugh. I always hate when this stuff comes up because while it's unfortunate it is a great way to spread incorrect "truths". I'm not going to weigh in on the eggs because I have no idea what exactly happened and I'm sure the non-ag media covering it doesn't really either. These people are no more qualified to discuss ag production than they are nuclear science. As for "Food Inc.", I will give them that there are a couple of valid points, but there's a lot of straight up BS in there, too. My point is that while it's fine to look at those types of documentaries, be sure you know where they are coming from, who produced them, what their qualifications are and what their agenda is. Then look for equal representation on the other side of the issue so you can be fully informed, not just a little robot repeater of "truths".

Take this article for example. A great point for showing what's advertised as being a silver-bullet solution may be only part of the total equation.

http://www.nytimes.com/20....html?_r=1

Another favorite miss-information topic of mine is PETA and HSUS. Check this out (Humanewatch.org) for some interesting facts, such as the fact that less than 1% of donations received by HSUS actually go to animal shelters. Significantly more cash pads the pockets of those running the operation. Donate locally if you really want to help, don't give your cash to a money-hungry CEO in California.
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Posted by Levi Forman (+3718) 11 years ago
I thought this thread was going to be about greeters that don't smile.
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Posted by Mandi (+357) 11 years ago
Anyone know who has fresh farm eggs in Miles City? Would love to buy some!
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Posted by Elizabeth Drews (+39) 11 years ago
Great Grains usually carries eggs from localish farmers...
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11885) 11 years ago
Hey, Levi, I don't know how anyone could smile standing in that horrible entryway at the local Wally World, with the fans blowing so loudly it is painful.

I know some folks raise eggs locally because they turn up at the Star now and then. Cute little brown ones.
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Posted by Dan Mowry (+1431) 11 years ago
Like "organic" producers can't fall victim to salmonella in the hen house?

I think there's a false sense of security about the "where you get them" part of the equation - if you have genuine concerns about salmonella.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6170) 11 years ago
I think the point is that a small farmer can't produce millions of contaminated eggs and introduce them into the national food chain. Of course small farmers can have salmonella issues, but because they are smaller they tend to be able to control that stuff a bit better.
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Posted by Steve Allison (+974) 11 years ago
I believe that the egg is a sealed container that salmonella can not get into. The bad eggs are from sick chickens so the egg gets the salmonella before the shell forms. On a small farm eggs are hand collected so the chickens are seen every day and sick one can be removed and dealt with. In a large operation, chickens are machine feed and eggs gravity and machine collected. This means no one sees the sick ones and it lets sick hens stay in production longer producing bad eggs that get shipped out.
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Posted by Dan Mowry (+1431) 11 years ago
Salmonella can be on the outside - the shell, too. It's the same tract inside the hen all the way through.

A great many small "organic" producers account for a great many cases of salmonella each year, too. A casual stroll on the FDA site shows numerically cases-reported vs. distribution are not minor. (eg. Few LARGE producers with large, occasional reports as opposed to may SMALL producers with frequent, small reports). The devil is in the math-detail.
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Posted by mike newell (+354) 11 years ago
We should all just get a couple chickens then if we get sick we have no one to blame but ourselves!
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Posted by tax payer (+350) 11 years ago
Healthy chickens get salmonella, so you cannot tell by looking at the chicken. Eggs shells are porous and absorb. Salmonella can be transferred to the egg from the chicken or the handlers of the eggs, rodents and dirty equipment.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6170) 11 years ago
Actually, I thought that eggs shells are not porous until they are washed. In other countries, folks often leave their eggs on the counter rather than keep them in the fridge and grocery stores don't even keep them refrigerated. I understand that it is because the eggs in the US are washed and sanitized which removes a protective membrane which normally prevents bateria from entering the egg. In this case, I assume that one would wash the egg just before using it to wash off any bacteria on the outside.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11885) 11 years ago
Whether large or small, when found to be a filth-ridden hell hole, rather just ponying up a few bucks, these places should be SHUT DOWN with the owner required to pay his employees (even the illegals) until such time as the farm is found to be sanitary. Just like mine owners, these big companies pay off their fines and change nothing. They only care about profit, not human life, and need to have their pocketbooks seriously whacked to get the point across.
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Posted by john w caylor (+82) 11 years ago
Salmonella enteritidis Infection

Egg-associated salmonellosis is an important public health problem in the United States and several European countries. A bacterium, Salmonella enteritidis, can be inside perfectly normal-appearing eggs, and if the eggs are eaten raw or undercooked, the bacterium can cause illness. During the 1980s, illness related to contaminated eggs occurred most frequently in the northeastern United States, but now illness caused by S. enteritidis is increasing in other parts of the country as well. Consumers should be aware of the disease and learn how to minimize the chances of becoming ill.

A person infected with the Salmonella enteritidis bacterium usually has fever, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea beginning 12 to 72 hours after consuming a contaminated food or beverage. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without antibiotic treatment. However, the diarrhea can be severe, and the person may be ill enough to require hospitalization.

The elderly, infants, and those with impaired immune systems may have a more severe illness. In these patients, the infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics.

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How eggs become contaminated

Unlike eggborne salmonellosis of past decades, the current epidemic is due to intact and disinfected grade A eggs. Salmonella enteritidis silently infects the ovaries of healthy appearing hens and contaminates the eggs before the shells are formed.

Most types of Salmonella live in the intestinal tracts of animals and birds and are transmitted to humans by contaminated foods of animal origin. Stringent procedures for cleaning and inspecting eggs were implemented in the 1970s and have made salmonellosis caused by external fecal contamination of egg shells extremely rare. However, unlike eggborne salmonellosis of past decades, the current epidemic is due to intact and disinfected grade A eggs. The reason for this is that Salmonella enteritidis silently infects the ovaries of healthy appearing hens and contaminates the eggs before the shells are formed.

Although most infected hens have been found in the northeastern United States, the infection also occurs in hens in other areas of the country. In the Northeast, approximately one in 10,000 eggs may be internally contaminated. In other parts of the United States, contaminated eggs appear less common. Only a small number of hens seem to be infected at any given time, and an infected hen can lay many normal eggs while only occasionally laying an egg contaminated with the Salmonella bacterium.

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Who can be infected?

The elderly, infants, and persons with impaired immune systems are at increased risk for serious illness.

Healthy adults and children are at risk for egg-associated salmonellosis, but the elderly, infants, and persons with impaired immune systems are at increased risk for serious illness. In these persons, a relatively small number of Salmonella bacteria can cause severe illness. Most of the deaths caused by Salmonella enteritidis have occurred among the elderly in nursing homes. Egg-containing dishes prepared for any of these high-risk persons in hospitals, in nursing homes, in restaurants, or at home should be thoroughly cooked and served promptly.

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What is the risk?

In affected parts of the United States, we estimate that one in 50 average consumers could be exposed to a contaminated egg each year. If that egg is thoroughly cooked, the Salmonella organisms will be destroyed and will not make the person sick. Many dishes made in restaurants or commercial or institutional kitchens, however, are made from pooled eggs. If 500 eggs are pooled, one batch in 20 will be contaminated and everyone who eats eggs from that batch is at risk. A healthy person's risk for infection by Salmonella enteritidis is low, even in the northeastern United States, if individually prepared eggs are properly cooked, or foods are made from pasteurized eggs.

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What you can do to reduce risk

Eggs, like meat, poultry, milk, and other foods, are safe when handled properly. Shell eggs are safest when stored in the refrigerator, individually and thoroughly cooked, and promptly consumed. The larger the number of Salmonella present in the egg, the more likely it is to cause illness. Keeping eggs adequately refrigerated prevents any Salmonella present in the eggs from growing to higher numbers, so eggs should be held refrigerated until they are needed. Cooking reduces the number of bacteria present in an egg; however, an egg with a runny yolk still poses a greater risk than a completely cooked egg. Undercooked egg whites and yolks have been associated with outbreaks of Salmonella enteritidis infections. Both should be consumed promptly and not be held in the temperature range of 40 to 140 for more than 2 hours.

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Reducing the risk of Salmonella enteritidis infection

Keep eggs refrigerated.
Discard cracked or dirty eggs.
Wash hands and cooking utensils with soap and water after contact with raw eggs.
Eat eggs promptly after cooking. Do not keep eggs warm for more than 2hours.
Refrigerate unused or leftover egg- containing foods.
Avoid eating raw eggs (as in homemade ice cream or eggnog). Commercially manufactured ice cream and eggnog are made with pasteurized eggs and have not been linked with Salmonella enteritidis infections.
Avoid restaurant dishes made with raw or undercooked, unpasteurized eggs. Restaurants should use pasteurized eggs in any recipe (such as Hollandaise sauce or caesar salad dressing) that calls for pooling of raw eggs.
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