Cloth Diapers
Posted by Toni Rentschler (+1517) 11 years ago
I am going on my third and was thinking about all the cloth diapers services that are out there. The closest I have found is Polson. Does anyone think something like this would go over well here? Just looking for a few thoughts on this.
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Posted by Shu (+1795) 11 years ago
I will tell you this: if you want to do cloth diapers, you really don't need a service to do it. My mom used cloth with me and all 4 of my siblings - bought the diapers herself, used a tight-lidded bucket to soak them in-between changes and, yes, she even cleaned and washed them...not pleasant to have to do that, for sure, but she tolerated it pretty-well and likely saved us thousands of dollars over the cost of disposables.

It's not for everyone, but it can be done yourself if there isn't a "service" nearby.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11757) 11 years ago
When I worked as a nanny, I did a load of diapers every day. No biggie. Just be sure to rinse the solids in the toilet bowl when they are fresh rather than stuffing it in a diaper hamper for a day or two. Some kids are sensitive to some detergents and fabric softeners so you might have to watch out for that.
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Posted by Toni Campbell Tivy (+143) 11 years ago
Most people I know wash the diapers themselves. It's probably the most economical way to go. The best thing I've seen is these diaper covers called "Fuzzy Buns" which you insert a diaper onto and snap onto the baby. They are easy to wash as not too much ever sticks to them. Also you don't have to wrestle with the diaper pins, a big bonus after the baby gets wigglier and you start stabbing yourself as you try to pin up the diaper.

If a diaper service wasn't too expensive it might be a good business. The ones around here cost more per diaper than the cost of buying disposable diapers (for pick up, cleaning and delivery), so you have to have some extra money and REALLY love the environment to actually use one of them.
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Posted by Lorin Dixson (+596) 11 years ago
When my kids were born I insisted on cotton diapers, because I can't even stand to wear a polyester shirt. So I felt it was wrong to put their little bottoms in plastic. Since then they have grownup and have kids of their own and have pretty much convinced me I was probably wrong, that the disposable diapers actually are better and keep them dryer with less diaper rash. I am still not sure of that though, I still wouldn't want to be wrapped in plastic. Who knows though if I get old enough there is the possibility I'll find out.
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Posted by Toni Rentschler (+1517) 11 years ago
Yeah I have seen alot of the different diapers that are out there.

-Prefolds, the three sectioned off ones.
-Gdiapers, theones that are fabric with the flushable middles.
-Then just the other premade fabric diapers.

Just looking intoeverything. The group in Polson, they are $18 per week. That would be over $20 more(min.) per month for diapers. Just looking to see what others thought. I was thinking just washing myself.
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
I cloth diapered both my children. They are not hard at all, especially if breastfeeding. Poop does not get nasty until solid foods are introduced. I actually learned accidently that cloth diapers are super-duper easy to care for, but I never cared for diapers at home the super-duper easy way because of what I thought people would think and because the washer was available to wash everyday. I used the super duper easy way with camping and hiking and some vacation trips. Immediately (ASAP at the very least) after removing a wet diaper, I would hang (or clip) it over a branch in a tree or a place where it would have full air and light, preferrably sun. When I came back to get it, it was white as could be, good as new and ready to use again.

The younger the baby, the more easily reusing wet cloth diapers is. That is because tinier babies do not concentrate their urine. As the kidneys continue to develop, they become more efficient at filtering and conserving water, so as babies get older, wet (urine) diapers need to be washed more often because they will get urine-stained (The urine is not so much like water anymore, darker more concentrated).

It is important to know that urine is essentially sterile, ie without bacteria unless infection is present, so urine itself is not dirty. It is along the journey of leaving the body that urine becomes contaminated and, of course, we all know germs are everywhere on everything and everybody. When a warm diaper is placed in a closed environment without air and light, this is a prime place for whatever germs are there to rapidly multiply and along with that comes stink. Closed diaper pails and plastic bags are ideal for growing bacteria in wet diapers. Just remember, germs thrive in warm, moist, dark places. Take as many of those conditions away as possible and you will win the battle against stinky diapers that are therefore difficult to clean and that can cause diaper rash due this overgrowth of germs.

I usually let wet diaper sit more than 24 hours without washing, and I would hang them over the edges of the airy laundry basket I used for them, anything but sealing them up or piling them up (covering hiding or whatever) to prevent bacterial growth and stink. (Once they are dry they can be piled up in the basket, but not when they are wet.)

I met a friend here in town, who is no longer here, that confirmed my suspicion that wet (urnine only) diapers could be reused for up to a couple of weeks before washing. She did things this way with all 3 of her children. She had a clothes line in the baby's room where she would immediately pin wet diapers up by the corners after removal. (maximum air exposure to all surfaces of the diaper) Once dry on the line they were ready to go again for baby to wear. She often did not mess with folding diapers, just pulled one off the line.

Like me, she had no problems with diaper rash as long as wet and/or dirty diapers were immediately removed. Giving baby's bottom as much as air as possible and keeping wetness off is the key to preventing diaper rash. I still have the 1 jar of petroleum jelly my Mom thought I needed to have for diapered bottoms (my daughters are 20 and 18 years old now). It has been used for all kinds of other things like lubricant for the spinning wheel with which it hangs out, and maybe once or twice with my first daughter and definitely never after that. I never bought any diaper rash medications or ointments, never had a need.

For poopy diapers, fleece liners are nice to remove solids because solids do not stick to them as easily. There use to be some thin throw-away liners a person could by, also. These poopy diapers do need immediate attention, removing the solids and washing out if needed, and wringing them out to prevent germ growth, staining and stink. Again, it is essential to get air to them as opposed to closing/sealing them up somewhere.

Later, I have to feed my sheep.
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
I have made diapers. You can make them from any soft cotton fabric (old T-shirts even), all different shapes and types. I do have patterns.

I still have a big box of diapers I have made and sold a few, but now I am thinking I maybe ought to save them for grandkids (dreaming), that along with continuing to make wool diaper covers and other wool stuff for grandkids and stashing them. I love doing this, always have. I have been trying to write up patterns for these and making some progress, but I am not as good about writing what I do down. It is an ongoing project. Lots of irons in the fire...I do have a good start. I don't want to wait until babies are on the way or already here. I am too slow to keep up with fast-growing babies.

If you are interested in patterns or wool yarn or wool covers, I might be of help and able to part with some. It is best to call me or email me, though: Dawn Ann, [email protected] or 234-1747.
My husband is the one that told me about this diaper stuff. I had to make a new username here because I could not remember my old one.

Don't use plastic or rubber pants or any cover that prevents air circulation to baby's bottom!) Use wool over acrylic because wool prevents bacterial growth and therefore stink. The wet wool covers do not need to be washed but every few weeks unless they get poop on them.

My daughter in Australia said she learned to always wear wool with her dairy milking job because cows would poop and pee on her (hat on her head). She says as long as you let wool dry by the heater and shake off the junk, you can just keep wearing it, and it does not stink like other fabrics. Wool does shed debris. She swears by wearing wool for working the farm, also. She did know this before she left, but she really knows it now!
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
http://www.keepandshare.com/doc/view.php?u=1617179 Free Wool Crochet Diaper Cover Pattern

http://www.keepandshare.com/doc/view.php?id=1599134&dn=y Cloth Diaper Guide

http://www.keepandshare.com/doc/view.php?id=1613625&dn=y Another Cloth Diaper Guide

I have patterns for diapers like the ones in these guides. Prefolds don't need much for a pattern, just measurements. Don't buy material. Just find old cotton clothes to turn into diapers.

I do have another knit diaper cover pattern online, but it is for a more advanced knitter. I need to get some simpler patterns posted. I am always coming up with something else, but I am not as good at writing up patterns so it can be repeated by others or so it can be done again in the future.
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
I forgot to mention that cloth diapers need to be changed more often. You can't get away with leaving a baby in a wet diaper like you can with disposables. That absorbant stuff in disposables is not good for baby or the envirnonment, however, not to mention the plastic. It has been awhile since I read on that stuff, but it is bad stuff, similar to the stuff that caused toxic shock syndrome in women, if I remember right.

Always immediately change a wet diaper. Wet skin leads to diaper rash, skin-breakdown, and infection, especially where there is skin-to-skin contact (between skin folds, etc).
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Posted by montanajane (+289) 11 years ago
I had 4 kids and used cloth diapers with them. I personally cannot imagine just drying out a wet diaper and reusing it without washing it. To me it makes me think of dryig out toilet paper and reusing it.
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Posted by polar bear (+509) 11 years ago
You might want to do some research. I understand that disposables are probably more environmentally friendly since they don't require hot water and chemicals to get them clean. Also, it has been years for me, but my understanding is that disposables are not only more comfortable for baby, but healthier. Things may have changed since I had my kids, but if memory serves, my pediatrician was not encouraging when he found out I was using cloth on my first child. Those awful plastic pants required back then caused all sorts of problems.
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Posted by Gail Finch Shipek (+94) 11 years ago
When I was choosing cloth vs. disposable 20 years ago, the estimate for decomposing of the disposable diaper was 85 years. I decided to use cloth as I hoped the diaper would not outlive my daughter. Tonight I read online that the estimate is now 500 years.
Glad I used cloth.
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Posted by Stan Wheeler (+1195) 11 years ago
I used cloth with my youngest, and cannot recommend them enough. I used Fuzzy Buns with Joey Hemp-a-roo liners. Very simple to keep clean. You never swish them to remove solids, just dump the solids in the toilet and flush. It comes right off. He never had a rash when using the cloth, but did with disposables. You do have to change more often, but I never considered that a problem. I bought 12 diapers. I used medium size, and they lasted until he was 3 and trained. They have several snaps so adjust well. I had to wash the diapers every 2-3 days, and kept disposables on hand for when they were drying. They do have certain rules for washing, so pay attention to them. You can (and I did) ruin them if not cared for properly. Such as, never use oxi clean on them. So I diapered my son for 3 years for about $250 dollars. Not bad!
Liz

[This message has been edited by Stan Wheeler (1/18/2010)]
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Posted by poisonspaghetti (+281) 11 years ago
I used cloth diapers with both of my kids. They were easy to use, easy to wash, and my kids had very few incidents of diaper rash especially compared to my friends' babies wearing disposables. Part of that, I think, was that my friends let their babies wear a single disposable diaper until it was pretty soaked, in part because disposables are expensive and they didn't want to change them too frequently. How many times have you seen a baby or toddler wearing a disposable diaper that is so wet, it's heavy? I changed my babies' diapers as soon as they were soiled because, after the initial investment in cloth diapers, I didn't have to worry about how much each one cost.

[This message has been edited by poisonspaghetti (1/18/2010)]
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Posted by Bob Netherton II (+1905) 11 years ago
You also don't generally see a cloth diaper wadded up and left on the bleachers after a game, either.

P.S. I am trying to picture Amorette as a nanny.

[This message has been edited by Bob Netherton II (1/18/2010)]
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Posted by Sarah Peterson (+374) 11 years ago
I've found tons of cloth diaper lots on Ebay; not necessarily all used either!
I used a prefold with a Bummi (I think--maybe it's a Bummikins) cover and that worked great. I have heard good things about the Gdiapers too.

I have often thought about a diaper service here. I think that people may be more apt to commit to cloth if someone else washed them.
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
Reusing diapers which had only urine in them is not something I did on a regular basis, just learned accidently out hiking. It sure makes travel with diapers easy, esp camping, hiking and fishing easy. It works (Neither of my girls were plagued with diaper rash whether at home or week long trips, and I never used any ointments and what not that people think are a must.)
Like I said, the tinier the baby, the more dilute the urine (ie like water) because the kidneys are less mature. Therefore, the diapers will need more washing as the baby grows older. Urine is essentially sterile unless there is an urinary tract infection (POO IS FULL OF GERMS which are naturally in the digestive tract, SO YOU DEFINITELY WANT TO GET THAT ONE OFF BABY's SKIN). IF diapers are changed IMMEDIATELY (more like every 1-2 hours with cloth if you do not know exactly when the baby urinated), the germs that are present everywhere have not had a chance to multiply in that WARM, MOIST, DARK ENVIRONMENT. DO NOT USE PLASTIC AND RUBBER PANTS; this makes an environment even more prime for germ growth and skin breakdown (diaper rash) and infection. KEEPING BABY's BOTTOM DRY everywhere, between the folds and all, is the key.

My friend just confirmed my suspicion that wet diapers could be washed less often. You can make cloth diapering as easy or complicated as you want.

Also, whether or not poo can be shook out in the toilet depends on how formed it is. Breast-fed babies will have less formed stools. Liners are nice to have, so you can avoid washing out diapers.

Remember: LIGHT (SUNLIGHT IN PARTICULAR ESPECIALLY) and AIR CIRCULATION are important for killing germs and preventing germ growth. NO WETNESS BETWEEN FOLDS OF SKIN,either. Pat dry when drying bottoms, too. If you start to see redness, give baby's bottom some air after changing by letting them lay on protective mat,etc.

There are lots of extra goodies that can be used for disinfecting, or deordorizing, etc. I do recommend Bac_Out for soaking really dirty diapers. It is usually at health food stores. I order it from a company that has a truck come thru MC monthly. I did not have it back when I had diapers, but it is great stuff. Vinegar is suppose to be good for softening diapers that are line-dried in the sun. Tea tree oil, and aloe vera gel etc to make baby wipes. Those are just things I am familiar with in recent years. I never used anything different than with ordinary washing, not even special baby detergent, and just a wet rag to clean bottoms. (BELIEVE ME: I was on a shoe string budget. I married a freshman college student and had both children while he was in school and stayed-home with both.)

Other than the extra detergent and water for the extra washing, my ABSOLUTE TOTAL spending on the diapering scene was less than $150 on all new diapers that lasted thru both my children, and the only reason it was that high is that I did come across some very simple fitted type, velcro closure diapers after I started out with pre-folds. They were much more expensive, but my husband was not afraid to change a diaper since there were no pins. I probably had 4 dozen diapers all together. The prefolds got used for liners or extra protection at night. I did not have any covers at all. The nice thing about not using a cover is that you definitely know when you have a wet diaper. I remember seeing someone whose Grandma made wool diaper covers for her baby, but that is the only time I ever saw anything like that. I would have liked to have had some. It stuck in my head that there was such a thing.

DAY-CARE: The biggest thing I can think of that would be a problem with cloth diapers is for those having to leave babies in day-care. Cloth diapers require someone to PAY ATTENTION and CHANGE when they SHOULD be changed (whether cloth or disposable). Many people will not deal with a cloth diaper no matter what kind! THINGS PROBABLY COULD NOT HAVE BEEN DONE RIGHT IF MY KIDS HAD BEEN IN DAY-CARE UNLESS IT WAS GRANDMA CARE (A COOPERATIVE GRANDMA!)
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
Now, I am really thinking. Babies in day care have more illness which can cause problems with the diaper scene. Diarrhea will lead to skin breakdown much faster, too. The only time I had to deal with diarrhea diapers was when my first daughter was a baby and we went picking huckleberries and ate them. I made a ton of huckleberry syrup and jam, and only my husband could eat it.

Anyway, that is why I do hope my grandkids are close enough to home that I can help take care of them if need be. Cloth diapers are best, but they work better when there is someone who can give that diligent care (including breastfeeding or supporting the breastfeeding etc).

It is a struggle nowadays as far as money goes. However, there is a ton of money to be saved in diligent care of babies which means less Dr. visits, etc.

Get as much done and collected up as you can before baby is born, because there is not too much time after, or find a Gma to help with making and collecting stuff for baby.
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
I have been trying to figure out how to say this for those who think urine is flat out dirty. There have been diaper groups online that got banned (and had to start their groups all over again) in the past for being porn or some such thing, even they were no such thing.

Baby in utero cycles the amniotic fluid in and out of its body(drinking and peeing), in a cycle, round and round. The fluid that comes out then goes back in and back out and back in, so how dirty is urine? (all the same fluid in and out and in and out, round and round, over and over again throughout pregnancy?

URINE is definitely something you don't want exposure to (or protected exposure and sanitation) if it belongs to someone else, especially for urine from other than tiny babies(not yours,esp). AND, THE LONGER A WET AND/OR DIRTY DIAPER IS LEFT ON OR BALLED UP SOMEWHERE (especially if enclosed in something occlusive like plastic) without some sort of cleaning (whether with water, air, and/or light) THE FILTHIER THAT DIAPER GETS (This applies whether cloth or disposable. Honestly,it is sick to think about those disposable diapers that get left on babies forever without changing.). GERMS MULTIPLY EXPONENTIALLY IF YOU ALLOW THE RIGHT CONDITIONS. You have to get rid of the conditions that are ideal for germ growth ASAP.

That is why when you give a urine specimen at the Dr offfice, you need to be really clean first, hopefully get the cleanest midstream urine, into hopefully a sterile specimen container, and get it to the lab IMMEDIATELY or refrigerator IMMEDIATELY temporarily if necessary. It cannot be left sitting around. It will filthy really fast. Results are not accurate otherwise, because it is next to impossible to get a 100% uncontaminated specimen this way and germs grow unbelievably fast.

*******BASIC MICROBIOLOGICAL SCIENCE******** Fancy cleaners, disinfectants, deodorizers are nice to have BUT not an absolute necessity. It is amazing just what the basic earthly elements of air, light and water do for you. (Temperature conditions and food source for germs play a role, also.)


There are people who have been stranded without water were smart enough to consume their own urine (that is an important thing to emphasize probably: that it is their own urine. Urine kept to one's own self...) and would have not survived otherwise.
(There have been other uses of urine, but I will stop there, especially because it is only stuff I have read about and heard about.)

POOP IS DIRTY! Baby does not get rid of any of that until after being born. MICROBES LIVE IN THE DIGESTIVE TRACT NATURALLY TOTALLY DIFFERENT THING! MANY OF THESE MICROBES ARE BENEFICIAL AND KEEP THE HARMFUL MICROBES UNDER CONTROL. If you don't properly dispose of poo, you will have infection and diseases of all types and degrees (from skin irritation to serious diseases like cholera). WATER FOR SANITATION to rid and prevent spread of germs!

**************ANYTHING WARM, WET, and NOT YOURS requires proper protection and sanitation to prevent the spread of germs(STANDARD PRECAUTIONS)**************
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
WHERE WOULD WE BE WITH WATER FOR PREVENTION OF DISEASE? AIR AND LIGHT (OR EXTREME HEAT OR COLD) ARE NOT ALWAYS ELEMENTS THAT CAN BE CONVENIENTLY UTILIZED FOR SANITATION, ESPECIALLY THE CLOSER PEOPLE AND/OR ANIMALS LIVE TO EACH OTHER.

FOR ANIMALS SCATTERED ABOUT ON THE RANGE, THE WASTE FROM THESE ANIMALS IS SCATTERED AROUND ENOUGH THAT THE AIR AND LIGHT EASILY PENETRATES IT, SANITIZES, BREAKS IT DOWN WITHOUT ANY EFFORT BY MAN. FOR ANIMALS CONFINED, KEEPING THINGS CLEANED OUT IS AN ISSUE THAT MAKES A JOB FOR MAN TO MANAGE (too much waste right where these animals live in a confined area). IN CLEANING ANIMAL QUARTERS, WATER MAY BE INVOLVED AND/OR THE STUFF MAY JUST BE SCOOPED AND SHOVELED OUT AND PLACED OUT SOMEWHERE WHERE IT IS EXPOSED TO AIR AND LIGHT AWAY FROM THE ANIMALS AND PEOPLE


I THINK MOST OF MANKIND IS SO DISCONNECTED FROM NATURE THAT KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THE ROLE OF AIR AND LIGHT IN SANITATION ARE NOT COMMON SENSE KNOWLEDGE LIKE THEY SHOULD BE. I think most people know something about temperature control to prevent germ growth and WATER is heavily used, but light and and air can and do play a role in infection control.
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Posted by Bridgier (+9195) 11 years ago
Shorty's really into urine.
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
NO. I am a believer and past user of entirely cloth diapers for diapering, but people are poorly educated in that arena. I guess it is sort of a lost art, if you can call it that.

Of course, I should not have to say, but I thought I may not be clear, and as evidenced by the last post, people can and do get the wrong ideas somehow. We do not mess with anything or anyone else after dealing with our own waste until after we wash our hands.
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
http://www.realdiaperasso...rfacts.php

THE REASONS TO USE CLOTH

Someone said cloth were less environmentally friendly than disposable because of water used (and chemicals?) We have a front-loading washing that uses far less water, energy, and detergent that top-loaders, but generally clean clothes far better. Front-loaders don't wear out clothes anywhere near as fast as top-loaders, either. (http://michaelbluejay.com/electricity/laundry.html)I know when you are young, money is a more difficult issue and I was not privvy to such a machine, but these machines easily pay for themselves. I will never have another top-loader.In terms of chemicals (detergent?), there are environmentally friendly detergents usually sold at health food stores.(http://www.seventhgeneration.com/ and http://www.reviewstream.c...s/?p=21820) I did not know much about alternative detergents when I diapered, though. I do use Bac-Out now with natural bacterial enzymes to eat at odor and stain-causing germs, and the company has a detergent (http://www.biokleen.com/p...012&cat=14) and a safe bleach (http://www.biokleen.com/p...312&cat=14). I think I would pre-soak or spray a solution of Bac-Out on diaper stains (like those huckleberry-stained diapers I never did get clean,junk ragged those ones) if I had a front-loader, because it is hard to imagine stains being removed without some sort of soaking or treatment when such little water is used by these washers.
I do order these things through a company that has a truck coming through once per month. They have some diapers and accessories, too.

http://www.diaperjungle.c...apers.html SOME DIAPER MAKING RESOURCES HERE

http://www.borntolove.com/history.html

http://www.realdiaperasso...ould-Know/

As far as the dumping ground for disposables, it is sick to think about. I guess the good microbes in the soil can take care of this problem if they can get through the plastic. How long does it take for the plastic to break down. What about the chemicals in these diapers?

"This unsanitary practice of commingling untreated sewage and solid waste in landfills - of dumping raw sewage directly into the environment should raise eyebrows among more than those whose job it is to oversee the public health. Material waste is yet another consequence of reliance on single-use diapers. From the time a single-use diaper is put on a baby, it may have a useful life of a few hours at most. Since there is no other application of the single-use diaper, use of this product in the U.S. alone wastes nearly 100,000 tons of plastic' and 800,000 tons of pulp derived from trees.[This unsanitary practice of commingling untreated sewage and solid waste in landfills - of dumping raw sewage directly into the environment should raise eyebrows among more than those whose job it is to oversee the public health. Material waste is yet another consequence of reliance on single-use diapers. From the time a single-use diaper is put on a baby, it may have a useful life of a few hours at most. Since there is no other application of the single-use diaper, use of this product in the U.S. alone wastes nearly 100,000 tons of plastic' and 800,000 tons of pulp derived from trees.[This unsanitary practice of commingling untreated sewage and solid waste in landfills - of dumping raw sewage directly into the environment should raise eyebrows among more than those whose job it is to oversee the public health. Material waste is yet another consequence of reliance on single-use diapers. From the time a single-use diaper is put on a baby, it may have a useful life of a few hours at most. Since there is no other application of the single-use diaper, use of this product in the U.S. alone wastes nearly 100,000 tons of plastic' and 800,000 tons of pulp derived from trees"(http://findarticles.com/p...i_6642692/)
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
I just heard about something on the radio this morning, something that truly has been on the rise for MANY years now: Moms being the main wage earners and Dads staying home to take care of. ALL of my female coworkers were the sole support or the main support of their young families in the location I was at the time I first got married and had my 2 children (more than 20 years ago). Though, I worked almost nil as possible, I was in that same boat of putting in a little work time with my husband in school, and my husband helping with the babies when he could. Luckily, I could schedule my work here and there around my family, and my husband was often not "in class", home studying, so he could take care of my babies during those short time slots that I was working. Major juggling! Anyway, it was hard, and school was not the worst time to have our children, nor was it the most ideal. It worked out pretty good, though.

ANYWAY, I JUST WANTED TO SAY: "DADDY MOMS ARE MODERN DAY HEROES!" If you can swing it, and if that is what it takes to give those babes the best, go for it and stand proud!
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
That monthly truck comes from www.azurestandard.com. It has always been a struggle here to keep enough people ordering to keep the truck stopping.
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Posted by Shorty (+81) 11 years ago
http://www.keepandshare.c...93213&da=y This pattern shows velcro, but snaps can be used. You can make longer back flaps and have the front come more straight up, not having that little bit or ear or flap, with the front snapping to some place on the back flaps. I have made and sold a few a long time ago, but the real value in doing this stuff is for your own family, and that will be my primary reason for making more of these.
I do have a snap press, that a person could come here and use. I can't remember what I have for snaps, but they can be purchased online.
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Posted by Amber V (+56) 11 years ago
Hi, I am currently cloth diapering my son and will be cloth diapering number 2 soon! I currently use Fuzzi Bunz, but have made some of my own that are similiar to Fuzzi Bunz called KCK one. I am licensed to sell them or you can go purchase the pattern and make them yourself if you are interested in sewing. If you have questions about cloth diapering or are interested in the KCK one please don't hesitate to contact me. E-mail is the best at [email protected] If you would rather talk by phone we can do that to.

Hope that helps,

Amber
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Posted by skoh (+327) 11 years ago
Good for you for wanting to go to cloth diapers! I do agree that there is a need for more diligence in changing the diapers but it's just no big deal.(even disposables should be changed often!) I used cloth with all of mine and ran a daycare where most of the babies also used cloth. I used a diaper pail that I soaked my diapers in with a tiny amount of Biz. Then when I washed them I dumped the water in the toilet and washed the diapers in the machine. I hung mine on the line, thinking that the sun may have "freshened" them more, but I'm sure the drier is fine. It just wasn't a problem at all. The mothers of the other babies took the wet diapers home in a plastic bag and immediately washed them or soaked them. There was never a problem with diaper rash. I have heard that the new materials in disposable diapers are quite as bad for the environment but I can't imagine that they're much better. Plastics just aren't good for the landfill. It's nice to see people wanting to help the environment.
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+14950) 11 years ago
My mom used cloth diapers on me and my ass is STILL chapped.
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Posted by Toni Rentschler (+1517) 11 years ago
Thank you all for all the great input that there has been. I will be doing the cloth diapers, Just waiting for baby now!
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