Twenty Ten
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Posted by David Schott (+17062) 11 years ago
I see in the news that how you say 2010 is a hot topic of sorts. Do you say, "two thousand and ten", "two thousand ten", or "twenty ten"?

I've found myself saying "two thousand and ten" but I'm leaning toward "twenty ten" as making more sense in the long run.
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Posted by howdy (+4944) 11 years ago
I vote for twenty ten...it's quicker...
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Posted by Josh Rath (+2305) 11 years ago
I say Twenty-Ten. Two Thousand Ten is not correct in my opinion. We said Nineteen Ninety Nine, because One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety Nine or Nineteen Hundred Ninety Nine sounded stupid correct? So why not do the same for Twenty Ten, VS Two Thousand Ten?
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Posted by Gail Finch Shipek (+94) 11 years ago
So next year do we continue and say twenty eleven, and so forth for the next 90 years? Hmm, not sure what I like.
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Posted by Josh Rath (+2305) 11 years ago
Think of it this way. The movie, 2012... Did you say Twenty Twelve, or Two thousand and twelve?
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Posted by Bob Netherton II (+1905) 11 years ago
After twenty-twelve, it won't matter, will it?
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Posted by Dan Mowry (+1438) 11 years ago
I'm not sure Josh's logic quite works as to what is correct versus what sounds stupid.

However, the National Association of Good Grammar (NAGG... really) published a statement that "Twenty Ten" was what they decreed we should use.

Admittedly, they didn't say it was correct because, mathematically, "Two Thousand Ten" is the proper verbal date. "Twenty Ten" was recommended not because it's correct (as it's not) but because English speaking societies tend to shorten dates in this manner (as evidenced from "Nineteen Ninety Nine") for brevity. In spite of of all those many years of speaking it incorrectly - culturally it's the norm. Hence the recommendation of "Twenty Ten." Again, culturally, Twenty follows Nineteen so the weight is given to how we've grown accustomed to saying things. It's been wrong all these years but we've at least been consistent.

The hope was to stave off this horrible, kitten-killing, cultural habit of calling it "Two Thousand..." as so much ground was lost in the single-digit years (2000-2009) that it was felt now was the time to take a stand once and for all lest we truly screw ourselves into the ground by not getting out of the habit.

There was a certain irony in reading the author's statement in that he referred to these previous years as "aught" and then the number ("Twenty Aught Nine" - the year we just completed). This didn't phase him.

He did, however, acknowledge this only goes so far in things concerning cultural habits... such as Arthur C. Clarke's books "2010: The Year We Make Contact" or "2001 A Space Odyssey."

Linguistics Professor George Lakoff said:

""It's not wrong to say 'two thousand ten... and it's not like 'twenty ten' is the right way."

His explanation involves cognitive reference points, standards of speech and recognizing as anachronistic the notion that grammar can be right or wrong as people and cultures evolve."

He agreed that Twenty Ten would take over because it's how we roll.
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Posted by Amorette Allison (+11757) 11 years ago
We said "nineteen ten" a hundred years ago so "twenty ten" just seems logical to me.
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Posted by Bob Netherton II (+1905) 11 years ago
You seem pretty spry, Amorette.
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Posted by Dan Mowry (+1438) 11 years ago
Amorette, you're much older than I thought!


/ducks and runs away/
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Posted by Bill Freese (+479) 11 years ago
Reading all the old papers when preparing for the Stardust column, Amorette tends to speak of anything that happened 25 years ago, or 50 years ago, or 100 years ago, as if it just happened because she just read about it in the paper.
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Posted by Bill Freese (+479) 11 years ago
Oh, and I am pretty sure that I have heard people say "nineteen ninety-nine" and "nineteen hundred and ninety-nine" and even "in the year of our Lord one thousand nine-hundred and ninety-nine" without anybody jumping up and saying "stop, that is not the official way to say it". I hope "two thousand ten" and "twenty ten" will be able to coexist in peace in a world where independent thinking is valued and variety is the spice of life.
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Posted by Dan Mowry (+1438) 11 years ago
Bill... I think you're missing the fun of this all.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17335) 11 years ago
Hmmmm....I might be the only one who has been saying "twenty oh nine, twenty oh eight, twenty oh seven..." for the last nine years or so....
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Posted by Dan Mowry (+1438) 11 years ago
Don't feel bad Gunnar... I'm still writing "2008" on paper when I need to fill paperwork out.

It'll be Twenty Eleven before I start writing 2010.
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Posted by Josh Rath (+2305) 11 years ago
I seem to be having the same issue Dan. I still write 2008, but I catch myself on extremely important documents.
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Posted by howdy (+4944) 11 years ago
time flies when you're having fun!!
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Posted by Sarah Peterson (+374) 11 years ago
Am I the only one who had been saying "oh-nine" and now is saying "oh-ten?"
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17335) 11 years ago
If you are saying "twenty-oh-ten" then the year is 20010 and we have all evolved a third eyeball in the center of our foreheads.
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Posted by Steve Sullivan (+1334) 11 years ago
I don't think I recall ever hearing anybody say "twenty nine" or "twenty eight" or "twenty seven" etc...except for Gunnar. So that does beg the question - do we say "twenty ten" or "two thousand ten". Maybe I just wont say it at all this year and only write it when somebody asks.

But then what happens at 2011?
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+17335) 11 years ago
Oh come now, Steve....back in the 1970s, did you say, "I just bought this cool new album from Rush...its called 'Two Thousand One Hundred and Twelve' ".



I don't see why Twenty Ten comes so hard to peoples' lips....
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Posted by K.Duffy (+1807) 11 years ago
I'm waiting til Wendy tells us which way is correct!
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Posted by Lorin Dixson (+596) 11 years ago
I think when two thousand one hundred and twelve comes I will just pronounce it twenty one twelve. I will be one hundred sixty seven years old then, but I will prabably just say I am 167.
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Posted by Dan Mowry (+1438) 11 years ago
Perhaps switch to hexadecimal?
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6165) 11 years ago
Ha! I think we should say it in base two.
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Posted by Dan Mowry (+1438) 11 years ago
Can that work?

Okay, so...


One Hundred Eleven, One Thousand One Hundred Ten. Is that right?
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Posted by Richard Bonine, Jr (+14950) 11 years ago
You guys/gals are giving new meaning to "ASCII" (a$$key)

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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6165) 11 years ago
It's 11111011010 so you could say, um, one one one one one zero, um, one, ummmm. Oh bugger it.
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Posted by Brian A. Reed (+6014) 11 years ago
I find myself using both "twenty-ten" and "two-thousand ten," depending on the context of the conversation. Doesn't matter all that much.

Kind of like flag lapel pins, really.
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