Who decides what a fire is named?
Published one month ago by The Billings Gazette

Flames climb as firefighters battle a wind driven fire in the Bull Mountains east of Roundup in July.

An air tanker turns to drop retardant as firefighters battle a wind driven fire in the Bull Mountains east of Roundup in July.

A plane drops a defensive line of retardant on the Bridge Coulee fire in the Lodgepole Complex near Sand Springs on July 23.

A Ravalli County sheriff's deputy talks with a local resident at a roadblock near the Roaring Lion fire in August 2016 at Westside and Roaring Lion roads southwest of Hamilton. 

The remains of a cow lost to the Bridge Coulee fire near Sand Springs lay on charred L O Bar Ranch pastureland in July.

U.S. Highway 200 is surrounded by blackened earth in July after the Lodgepole Complex fire burned through the area.

Smoke billows over Red Lodge in this aerial view of the Willie Fire in August 2000. The fire was named for Willie Nelson, whose concert drew about 3,000 fans to the Home of Champions Rodeo Grounds a half mile west of Red Lodge.

Sometimes, a name just fits.

In 2016, the aptly dubbed Roaring Lion Fire chewed through 8,658 acres in the forested mountains near Hamilton, reducing 16 houses to ashes and costing $11 million in firefighting efforts. Yet others seem almost tame compared to their presence on the landscape — the “Lodgepole Complex” sounds more like a mountain getaway than the literal wall of flames that last month laid waste to more than 270,000 acres of Eastern ...

Added: 25 days ago