The Troubled History of Horse Meat in America
admin
moderator
founder
Posted by MilesCity.com Webmaster (+8555) 6 months ago
The Troubled History of Horse Meat in America
The White House wants to reinstate the sale of horses for slaughter, but eating horse meat has always been politically treacherous.

President Donald Trump wants to cut a budget the Bureau of Land Management uses to care for wild horses. Instead of paying to feed them, he has proposed lifting restrictions preventing the sale of American mustangs to horse meat dealers who supply Canadian and Mexican slaughterhouses.

Horse meat, or chevaline, as its supporters have rebranded it, looks like beef, but darker, with coarser grain and yellow fat. It seems healthy enough, boasting almost as much omega-3 fatty acids as farmed salmon and twice as much iron as steak. But horse meat has always lurked in the shadow of beef in the United States. Its supply and demand are irregular, and its regulation is minimal. Horse meat’s cheapness and resemblance to beef make it easy to sneak into sausages and ground meat. Horse lovers are committed and formidable opponents of the industry, too.

The management of wild horse herds is a complex issue, which might create difficulty for Trump. Horse meat has a long history of causing problems for American politicians.
...

Horses originated in North America. They departed for Eurasia when the climate cooled in the Pleistocene, only to return thousands of years later with the conquistadors. Horses became a taboo meat in the ancient Middle East, possibly because they were associated with companionship, royalty, and war. The Book of Leviticus rules out eating horse, and in 732 Pope Gregory III instructed his subjects to stop eating horse because it was an “impure and detestable” pagan meat. As butchers formed guilds, they too strengthened the distinction between their work and that of the knacker, who broke down old horses into unclean meat and parts. By the 16th century, hippophagy — the practice of eating horse meat — had become a capital offense in France.

However, a combination of Enlightenment rationalism, the Napoleonic Wars, and a rising population of urban working horses led European nations to experiment with horse meat in the 19th century. Gradually, the taboo fell. Horses were killed in specialist abattoirs, and their meat was sold in separate butcher shops, where it remained marginalized. Britain alone rejected hippophagy, perhaps because it could source adequate red meat from its empire.

America also needed no horse meat. For one part, the Pilgrims had brought the European prohibition on eating horse flesh, inherited from the pre-Christian tradition. But for another, by the 1700s the New World was a place of carnivorous abundance. Even the Civil War caused beef prices to fall, thanks to a wartime surplus and new access to Western cattle ranges. Innovations in meat production, from transport by rail to packing plants and refrigeration, further increased the sense of plenty. Periodic rises in the price of beef were never enough to put horse on the American plate.

Besides, horse meat was considered un-American. Nineteenth-century newspapers abound with ghoulish accounts of the rise of hippophagy in the Old World. In these narratives, horse meat is the food of poverty, war, social breakdown, and revolution—everything new migrants had left behind. Nihilists share horse carcasses in Russia; wretched Frenchmen gnaw on cab horses in besieged Paris; poor Berliners slurp on horse soup.

...

Read More: https://www.theatlantic.c...eat/529665
permalink   ·  vote tally
Top
+1
supporter
Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+10118) 6 months ago
I had sausage made out of horse in Sweden many years ago. It was quite delicious. It was my late grandfather's favorite sausage.



http://www.americulinaris...orse-meat/
permalink   ·  vote tally
Top
+1
Posted by dcjdinmn (+57) 6 months ago
It troubled me every year at fair time to sell my fat steer. Feeding, grooming and working those bovine over the period of about a year each, I always fell into the trap of letting them become something like a pet. It never had the affect of tainting my love for beef except for a week or so following the auction. Personally I'd prefer to stop at dog, though if was one that I had a bad experience with and was prepared in a tantalizing dish, perhaps I'd give it a try, especially if hungry.
permalink   ·  vote tally
Top
+1
Posted by Rob Shipley (+402) one month ago
Webmaster, I sincerely appreciate your lengthy study of the history of horses and horse meat per se. You have done well here.
Many people know Miles City, Montana, became the Horse Capital of the World in the era 1915 to 1919. This was achieved owing the vast need for horses for the war effort in Europe and the huge numbers of horses roaming the Midwest of the USA and southern Canada. Miles City was the rail head for shipping thousands and tens of thousands of horses to New York City for shipment to Europe.
There are now more horses in Florida than Montana and the entire nation loves the Kentucky Derby, but, no one gets with horses like we do in Miles City.
The annual World Famous Bucking Horse Sale revitalizes this point every May. It is hard to think about slaughtering horses. To me, it is bad enough when 4 H youngsters sell their pets so we can eat them. But we can't all exist on pineapple or carrots or cats even though it is recorded when elderly people die alone in their apartments and are undiscovered for a week or so,dear and wonderful Tabby usually has tasted Grandma or Grandpa.
Top
Posted by Rob Shipley (+402) 24 days ago
Wild Horses and Horse meat
**************************
In the 1950s and early 60's my dad was asked several times to fly a Super Cub to locate bunches of wild horses in Garfield County and he did.
One time there was a mare that led a big bunch of about eighty (80) and after two (2) full days when all the cowboys had no success and dad could not get the mare to run the bunch into any canyons to catch them he took a shotgun loaded with bird shot and flew over her and shot her on top of her head.........they caught about fifty (50 after that.

Rob Shipley
Top
founder
supporter
Posted by Amorette Allison (+8861) 23 days ago
CBC kept many a family from starving during the Depression. Horses are livestock, not pets. I'll eat anything if the sauce is tasty.
permalink   ·  vote tally
Top
+3
Posted by Speedbump (+180) 23 days ago
Lobster was once considered trash food for the poor. I still think lobster don't taste that great. I prefer king crab or crayfish over lobster. Horse meat most likely tastes good. I would bet $100 that people blindfolded in a taste test and not told what it was... could not tell the difference between cow and horse meat.
A radio show in New York brought in a professional chef to cook up rat meat. The people in the studio went back for seconds even knowing what it was. It was that good. Meat is meat people. Plus if you actually know how to cook your can turn tough cuts of meat into something good. Slow and low makes it tender. Horse meat don't sound that bad... considering what the Donner party had for table fare...

[Edited by Speedbump (11/20/2017 10:01:59 PM)]
permalink   ·  vote tally
Top
+1