Gunnar, what's brewing?
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+8909) 5 years ago
What have you got going for winter beers?

I've a hearty, Scot's style ale in the brewpot right now. An American-style IPA goes next weekend, followed by a London-style Porter. I've one more to go, but haven't decided what it will be - maybe throw a bunch of odds & ends in the pot and brew a Mongrel ale.

We are running low on Bush Cider, so I'll work a batch of that into the schedule sometime soon as well.

I'm going to lay down a batch of October ale next month that will be ready to go for Halloween 2014.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+12360) 5 years ago
Funny you should mention that, Hal. I was just checking my inventory, and see that I have ingredients on hand for a Munich Dunkel. Trying to decide between that, or a Baltic Porter or a Traditional Bock.

I still have summer beers on tap....a Classic American Pilsner, a Kolsch, a Saison, and a Belgian Blond. I have a keg of Munich Helles lagering, as well as a Flanders Golden ale. I am about ready to keg a Belgian tripel, an Oktoberfest, and a Northern German hop beer.

I really need to brew an IPA soon, as my hops are ready to pick. Going to make IPA yeast starters this weekend.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+8909) 5 years ago
Sounds good and tasty.


It was a warmer than usual & busier than usual fall here, so I'm a little behind schedule. Summer beers will likely run out before winter brews are ready : -( But we air-freighted in a couple cases of wine when were the City last month, so we'll have something on hand to tide over.

What are you hoping your IPA with? I'm think Magnum for bittering, Liberty & Chinook for aromas, and Willamette for dry hopping.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+12360) 5 years ago
Hopping the IPA.....I am definitely going to dry hop with the ones I have picked today and finish picking tomorrow. That would be Cascades.

Your IPA hop bill looks good, Hal. As long as your freshest hops are your dry hops, you should be good to go.

As to your other question concerning what I am going to hop my IPA with....I obviously will be dry hopping with the freshly picked Cascade hops I now have drying in the garage. As far as the rest of the hops....I have Amarillo, Centennial, Simcoe, Columbus, Horizon, Summit, blah, blah, blah (read: a lot of PNW hops).

So it will be a crapshoot.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6163) 5 years ago
We were in Tacoma over Labor Day and I had a hefeweizen that was the best beer I'd ever had. It was a Big Horn from the Ram brewery which is a chain I was surprised to find out. It's unfiltered and was smooth and flavorful with little bitterness and no skunkiness at all. I could have had glass after glass. Too bad I can't get it here. Damn it!
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+12360) 5 years ago
Wendy, arrogant bastard that I am, I can crank those beers out from kettle to keg in 7 to 10 days. Easiest style of beer to brew in the world.

Now, what were we educated sorts discussing here?

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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6163) 5 years ago
Send me some and I'll be the judge of that, you arrogant bastard.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+12360) 5 years ago
Sorry, if said beer is bottled, carbed and shipped it will taste like crap.

One of the weird things you discover as a brewer, some beers are better served on tap. Processing activities turns some very delicate beers into cardboard.

Wendy, you and GVC are always welcome for dinner and homebrewed beers should you ever find yourself in Helena.
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Posted by Tim Wagoner (+725) 5 years ago
Maybe everyone should put your house on the itinerary for next their next vacation. Sounds like you could run a local Pub.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+8909) 5 years ago
Fresh? Gunnar, you city people are funny ; -) Fresh air, fresh water, and fresh fish are in bountiful supply here - for fresh hops I am at the mercy of my supplier in the City. Though I do have to say the good folks at Arctic Brewing in Los Anchorage seem to be in business as much for the love of beer and brewing as for profit and they do their best to treat their customers kindly. But the fact remains that I am at the tail end of a long, long distribution chain. So fresh is a matter of perspective.

Wendy, you should take up brewing. Brewing a decent pint is no more complicated than baking bread from scratch. Brewing a good beer is only a matter of practice. Start out brewing 5 gallon batches, by the time you've got 50-60 gallons under your belt, you'll be at the point where you can turn out a damned good product.

And don't let the Beer Jocks try to convince you that women cannot brew beer. The very etymology of the surname Brewster puts lie to that canard. Women have been in the forefront of brewing for all but the past two-three centuries out of the last eight to ten millennia. It was only when beer came to be treated as industrial commodity rather than a goodness served up to family that brewing became a male-dominated activity.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson (+6163) 5 years ago
Thanks for the invite, Gunnar. We just may take you up on that.

Hal, what a great idea. I bake fabulous bread.
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Posted by Kamermand (+9) 5 years ago
Brewed an amber this weekend using cascade hops...I just moved here a year ago and wanted to try using the well water from a shallow well here in the yard. I have been using the reverse osmosis water from either Walmart or Albertsons. I just wanted to give it a try. Glad to see that there are other homebrewers around!
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Posted by jj&j (+63) 5 years ago
For Hal. I have enjoyed your pics etc and was wondering where in Alaska you are. It appears you may be in a remote area somewhere. If you would rather not say ok but please continue to post pics.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+8909) 5 years ago
King Salmon - zip code 99613. Don't mind saying. It's not like a lot folks will end up on my door step - it's damned hard to get here from just about any place else.

We are kind of remote, but not nearly so much so as the outlying villages. But we are a good staging point to head out to some very remote communities.

We are on the Alaska Peninsula, Bering Sea side, 100-120 minutes by air from Anchorage (or 100-120 minutes by air from the nearest traffic light). Our village is on the Naknek River, about 15 miles as the raven flies from Bristol Bay. The Bay is the eastern most arm of the Bering Sea. The North Pacific is about 90-100 miles to the west on the other side of the Aleutian Range.

King Salmon has a year round population of around 350. Naknek, at the mouth of the River, is home to around 500 full time residents. South Naknek, across the River is home to around 70 people. The resident population is about evenly split between Alaska Natives and non-Natives.

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Posted by Jeff Denton (+763) 5 years ago
I'm in Helena often, I never heard of good beer there. Yes, you should open a pub. A private one.
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Posted by Hal Neumann (+8909) 5 years ago
Wendy,

You can likely buy the basic hardware needed to brew your first 5 gallon batch of beer for a hundred bucks. That doesn't include the brewpot and that is something that you don't really want to skimp on. To start out with you'd likely want a good quality stainless steel 8 gallon stock pot - it might be pricey, but you can use it for other things in the kitchen.

Aside from the brewpot, keep it simple and inexpensive to start with - most homebrew supply outlets have starter kits that will serve you just fine. If you find you enjoy brewing you can upgrade your hardware as need be.

Buy one good book - John Palmer is a good resource for beginning brewers or brewsters - I'd not read more than one book at the start - too much bookish advice could get confusing.

Do accept advice (tempered with common sense) from other brewers.

For your first batch or two while you are getting the feel of the process, go with recipe kits - you can produce a very drinkable beer from those kits. But, if brewing is something that you take to, you'll very quickly grow bored with the kits and want to begin crafting your own brews. And that is what it is all about.

I'd recommend starting with ales to begin with - they are simpler to brew.

Keep a journal with good notes of every batch you brew - ingredients, processes & etc. That journal will come to be your good friend over the years.

Beware of internuts Beer Jocks who believe that they, and only they, know how to brew.

You should give it a try - heck, everyone who enjoys beer should brew their own.
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Posted by jj&j (+63) 5 years ago
Thanks Hal for the geography lesson. If I ever win the lottery I will come and bang on your front door. Lovely place.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+12360) 5 years ago
Any of you brewers think your beer is any good?

Then enter it in this Bozeman beer competition.

https://www.facebook.com/...=1&theater
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+12360) 5 years ago
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+12360) 2 years ago
Always a topic that is popular with the mc.com readers, it must be time for an update.

Currently on tap: American pale ale, Belgian saison, classic American pilsner, Helles bock, Dusseldorf-style altbier, Burton stock ale, Tupelo honey mead, snowberry honey mead

Aging: Belgian pale ale (2 kegs), American pale ale (1 keg), Helles bock (1 keg)

In primary fermentors: German pilsner, Belgian tripel

I need to throw a party for I have no empty kegs available when the 20 gallons of beer in the primary fermentors is finished.
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson (+12360) 5 months ago
As I like to brew a smaller beer in order to generate yeast cakes for tripels, I brewed a Belgian pale ale this week.

OG 1.064, 10 gallons

22 lbs. Avangard pilsner malt
1 lb. Briess crystal 10
12 oz. Dingemann biscuit
3 lbs. table sugar added to start of boil.

Mash at 152 for 60 min, add boiling water to raise to 158 for 30 min.

3 oz. EKGs 6,2% 60 min
3 oz. Styrian Goldings 2.4% 10 min
0.5 oz. crushed coriander 10 min
0.5 oz. sweet orange peel 10 min

Split between Wy3522 LaChouffe and WY3787 Westmalle yeast. 2 L starters of each. Both are fermenting quite nicely.
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