Miles City vowels
Posted by Jim Birkholz 4 years ago
Any informed comments about why we are different from the rest of MT?
http://aschmann.net/AmEng/index_fi...nEnglishDialects.gif
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Posted by Dan Mowry 4 years ago
Even with the legend I can't figure out what breakdown Miles City is being given there?
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Posted by Levi Forman 4 years ago
I have to agree on the incomprehensibility of that graphic. It does seem odd that they seem to think that people in MC talk like they are from the midwest but are completely surrounded by people that talk differently.
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Posted by Jeri Dalbec 4 years ago
That is fantastic...That it explains it! What a find. Hope I read it right. I grew up in Cut Bank and Billings....which appears to be the reason that "Had does not rhyme with Bad". I definitely think that Miles City is near a dialect boundary, having many Norwegian relatives in North Dakota. Wonder if Miles City is not considered just cosmopolitan with fluctuating vowels????
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Posted by Buck Showalter 4 years ago
It's weird, but it may not be inaccurate. I was living in Seattle and out of nowhere a guy said to me, "You must be from Miles City." I'd never met the guy and the comment came from way out in left field. I asked him how he knew and he said he could just tell, it was bizarre and honestly a little disturbing.
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Posted by Kelly 4 years ago
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Posted by Gunnar Emilsson 4 years ago
The Miles City accent is best explained by the vast number of North Dakota expatriates living there, plus the Norwegians. It is mainly the Russian-German dialect that gives North Dakotas their unique accent. So the Prussian-Norwegian background gives the unique Miles City accent.

What is missing in the graphic is the most pronounced accent in Montana, that of the Butte-Anaconda region, or, as the locals there say it, "Anda-conda".
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Posted by Elizabeth Emilsson 4 years ago
The unique vowel sounds we have are matched by countless North Dakototan expressions that have been integrated into our language, like "oh for dumb", and "So here's the deal.", and" "It's no Big Deal.". The etiology of these expressions can be found in a book by Jim Anderson titled, "How to Speak Minesotian". The dialog in the movie "Fargo" captures these expressions perfectly.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson 4 years ago
I grew up with a Norwegian Minnesotan/South Dakotan and a Bostonian who when in his cups would drop all his Rs. "Go pahk the cah around the cahnah. Here's a qwauhtah." My mom, however, doesn't have a pronounced accent and was an English major so perhaps I don't have much of an accent. Frankly I don't know.
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Posted by Levi Forman 4 years ago
I was once accused of being from North Dakota by a woman in Kansas City who had only heard me say about 3 sentences so I guess I must have some sort of accent. This was after I had been living in the southwest and California for 10 years. Maybe Knowlton is outside that little circle around Miles City and I'm into the Minnesota/North Dakota area. No one in California ever mentioned my accent though, and I never noticed any accent on the Californians either but I don't imagine that I'm keyed in on that especially. I do very clearly notice an accent on the deer hunters that come over from Minnesota though.

[This message has been edited by Levi Forman (3/27/2011)]
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Posted by Dan Mowry 4 years ago
So, how, or what, are the outstanding things Miles Citians say that are so unique?

I've heard "No big deal" in California, Oregon, and Iowa. It's heard on television and films. I doubt the industry is owned by North Dakotans. I've never heard "Oh, for dumb" in my life.

What's the Miles City give-away?
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Posted by M T Zook 4 years ago
I was accused of having a Pennsylvania accent in Texas by a guy from Louisiana.
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Posted by Buck Showalter 4 years ago
Saying "North Dakota" always makes me feel like I'm exposing myself.
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Posted by Mike Wallick 4 years ago
When I went to Brown Institute for radio broadcasting in 1978 the word that caused the most concern amongst my peers was how we in Montana pronounce "interest" or "interesting".
We use 3 syllables instead of 2, which many others use, so it would be said as this: "in-trest" instead of "in-ter-est". Both are acceptable according to Webster (at least they were when the teacher checked in 1978).

Oh and btw, the most abused letter of the alphabet? "w" It shouldn't be pronounced "dub-ya" but should also be three syllables "double u".

[This message has been edited by Mike Wallick (3/27/2011)]

[This message has been edited by Mike Wallick (3/27/2011)]
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Posted by Wayne White 4 years ago
Montana is the only state that does not have accents, all the other states do.
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Posted by Wendy Wilson 4 years ago
Har, har. You've never hung out by the redneck door at Curster High School.
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Posted by howdy 4 years ago
uff-da...
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Posted by Amorette Allison 4 years ago
I was in a German class at college when the teacher was discussing accents. He said I sounded like a native speaker with a Danish accent except nothing I said made sense. That led us to regional U.S. accents. A girl from Chicago said, in her very nasal accent, "I noticed when I came to Montena that everyone had eccents." We fell out of our chairs laughing.

Ever notice that distinct Texas twang that goes along with being from Broadus?
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Posted by howdy 4 years ago
being from North Carolina, I think everyone I meet outside the south has an accent LOL...
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Posted by Wendy Wilson 4 years ago
There is a very distinct Utah accent which is very annoying. They often replace the long a sound in "sale" with the short e sound as in "sell." It drives me nuts. People also pronounce the word "tour" to rhyme with "bore". Aggghh!
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Posted by worldmom 3 years ago
I'm late to this party, but I had to chime in.

I have lived (Maryland, Texas, California, Nevada, Wyoming, Utah, Minnesota) and traveled all over the country, and I think Montanans sound most like Minnesotans. The long, rounded /o/ such as in "boat" is very Minnesota-esque, as is the long /a/ sounds in "ag" words such as "flag, bag, wagon," etc. I say "bag" with the same short /a/ sound as in "cat," but most folks around here say "bayg."

Wendy - I'm with you on the annoying Utah accent. I think you ought tuh drive over tuh American Fark to look at the moun'uhns and go tuh some garage sells. Then go getcher trash kicked at Zumba, cuz ohmyheck, it's so much fun! Don't fergitcher Bump-it!
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Posted by j2r 3 years ago
While you're in Utah, don't forget to pick yerself up a mill-dill so you can eat 'neat 'neat!!
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Posted by lexy 3 years ago
I moved here from California years ago and it still irritates me the way people around here say "bag". It is not a long "a" sound people.
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Posted by DEAN 3 years ago
WORLDMOM you nailed it!!! even the news anchors talk that way.I'm not sure English was required in Utah,but church was.
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Posted by Amorette Allison 3 years ago
Lexy, there is no standard pronunciation of anything. Everything is regional and dialectal. "American Standard English" was developed at the University of Missouri and, to my ear, sounds distinctly southern.

EVERYONE has an accent. No one is right or wrong except those guys on the BBC.
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Posted by Wayne White 3 years ago
Ya'll sound just fine to me, A.
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Posted by Monica LN 3 years ago
I'm with WORLDMOM on this too! I'm from MN and I have noticed that folks in Miles City speak the same way that I do though I was told by a gal once that I had an accent when she sounded just like me...
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